Tag: mockingjay

Five Fiery Hunger Games Memes

Oh the Hunger Games. Truly the best of the pack from the dystopian craze, at least in my opinion. It had everything. Fire, social commentary, death, crazy outfits. More movies than you can count. It’s been a while, but I know we’re still hype, and the second Mockingjay movie came out four years ago today, so let’s open some old wounds and have some laughs.

 

I’m Just Saying

Image via BeFunky

Look. If we were married, we would live in the same place, and therefore we’d have tons of time to work on the project. Just smart thinking, right? The only group project anyone ever wants to do. Yeah, this part of the story was insanely depressing, but don’t we all sometimes feel like we’re tap dancing just a few inches ahead of death? Just me? And if you’re asking someone to marry you in literally any other situation, you need to look happier about it. Just a tip.

 

No Games

Image via iStalker

The Hunger Games didn’t invent killing all your characters and breaking everyone’s hearts. If anything, The Hunger Games was more metal about it, because those books were directed at a younger audience. I mean, maybe younger people thank I think watch GOT, but the audience for this was potentially young. I was a teenager when the last book came out, probably, but imagine reading it and being Prue’s age, younger. Rooting for her. Too soon?

 

Advice vs. Execution

Image via MemeDroid

If it ain’t me. He’s just lucky he didn’t fall over. I know the act natural trope is crazy overused, but I just can’t be mad when it’s always so funny. As someone who’s never succeeded at seeming unbothered in my life, I can just relate on a really deep level. Sure, I’ve never gotten to the point of wearing a white suit about it, but I did once back into a table and fall over trying to act calm and professional. That might just be a me thing. Peeta does look awkward, though. Maybe because that collar’s clearly stabbing him.

 

Why?

Image via Instagyou

Look, I like to think I’d say to hell with the capital too, but at the same time, cushy job, probably some crazy hats, literally more food than you can eat… Sure, it worked out for him, but he really rolled the dice, didn’t he? For most of the rebellion it was like, hmm, do we fight or do we accept death? They could only profit. Maybe he saw an opportunity, maybe he was just a really good dude deep down, but his character really shows you the limits of first person narrative.

 

So Punny

 
Image via Pinterest

*air horn sound* Alright, it’s probably not that funny. I just love it when people laugh really hard and I don’t get it like that. Look at the reaction image! Is it that funny to someone? Is it ironic laughter? Either way I’m amused. I also have a bunch of questions about snow. He was basically omnipotent, and he couldn’t make that work for him. For all he seemed clever in the books, I really don’t know how he let himself get killed by an excited crowd. What a fall from grace.

Featured image via QuickMeme

Get Ready for ‘The Hunger Games’ Prequel Novel!

Yes, it’s true! Suzanne Collins is giving the world a prequel to her multimillion-selling trilogy The Hunger Games.

 

 

Katniss-shocked face

Image Via IMDB

 

Collins’ trilogy started in 2008, only a year after she finished her 5 book series The Underland Chronicles, with The Hunger Games – where in the nation of Panem, established in the remains of North America after an unknown apocalyptic event, the wealthy Capitol exploits the twelve surrounding districts by forcing representatives from each district, one boy and one girl between the ages 12 to 18, to fight each other to the death in a televised event.

The novel follows 16-year-old Katniss Everdeen, who volunteers for the 74th Hunger Games in place of her 12-year-old sister.

 

The Hunger Games Trilogy

Image Via Barnes and Noble

 

The novel received critical acclaim with Time calling the novel “a chilling, bloody and thoroughly horrifying book” and The New York Times noting “the considerable strength of the novel comes in Collins’ convincingly detailed world-building and her memorably complex and fascinating heroine” before going to sell millions of copies.

During this heyday, Collins signed a six-figure deal for three books with Scholastic. She did, and Catching Fire came out the following year and Mockingjay came out the next year in 2010. Catching Fire received praise for improving upon the first book and, like The Hunger Games, became a New York Times bestseller.

Mockingjay received praise for its portrayal of violence and romantic intrigue while it sky-rocketed to the top of all US bestseller lists upon its release.

 

 

Each of the novels were developed into films starring Jennifer Lawrence with Mockingjay being split into two parts. The films are largely responsible for setting off a trend of teenage dystopian films, but after Mockingjay Part 2 released, it seemed like the end of the series.

 

Suzanne Collins

Image Via CBC.ca

 

But come May 19 2020, Suzanne Collins will bring readers back to Panem in a prequel set 64 years before the beginning of her multimillion-selling trilogy, is coming next year. She said in a statement:

With this book, I wanted to explore the state of nature, who we are, and what we perceive is required for our survival…The reconstruction period 10 years after the war, commonly referred to as the Dark Days — as the country of Panem struggles back to its feet — provides fertile ground for characters to grapple with these questions and thereby define their views of humanity.

Scholastic Trade Publishing President Ellie Berger didn’t give us any new information, but he did tell fans that:

We are absolutely thrilled — as both readers and publishers — to introduce the devoted fans of the series and a new audience to an entirely new perspective on this modern classic.

Obviously, Lionsgate – who released the four Hunger Games movies – are already gearing up to adapt the prequel for a movie. Express.co.uk quotes studio’s chairman Joe Drake as saying, “We’ve been communicating with her during the writing process and we look forward to continuing to work closely with her on the movie.”

 

Featured Image Via Explore Georgia