Tag: memoir

“Despair Makes Us Fall and a Fall Makes Us Laugh”

The Crying Book isn’t sad. This New York Times Bestseller explores tears in a very original way; the author doesn’t follow a linear path, but reflects on crying and its origins in small, isolated, almost stanzaic paragraphs. This book is a historical, philosophical, existential probe into who, what, how, and why humans (and animals) cry. Heather Christle draws from historical and personal resources in order to weave together an intimate and educational book.

image via amazon

 

One of the beautiful and poetic ideas the author lands on in the book is that tears don’t necessarily fall. Or they do, and the words tears and fall always have this marriage of sorts, she insists. She goes on to talk about babies, (she’s pregnant,) and that for babies, to fall is primal, natural; she quotes Homer, who says it’s natural for us as babies to fall “from the knees of our mother.” She goes on to state: “On the moon, where the astronaut Alan Shepherd cried, gravity exerts one-sixth of the force it does on earth. Tears fall, but more slowly, like snow.” She goes on to state that Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong didn’t cry, or at least Armstrong’s tears did not fall. “Back in the Lunar Module, Aldrin photographed Armstrong with wet eyes. Would tears have dropped had they been here on Earth?”

Image via Madly Odd

There are several passages dedicated to the elephant, for the elephant is a grieving beast, known to mourn for days to months to over a lifetime if a child or family member has passed. Christle writes specifically about a hunter who shoots an elephant specifically to make the animal suffer, but the elephant withstands the cruel hunter’s torture and only sheds a few tears the second before he finally does pass away. In this case, it appears the animal only cried out of physical pain. We humans are a cruel race, but Christle mentions there are moths, too, “Mabre Elephantophila”, who feed on Elephant tears by scratching at their eyes—humans aren’t the only ones to make Elephants cry.

 

Other interesting facts: did you know Shirley Temple could cry on cue? As long as it was before lunch. One director did not know any of this and in order to make her cry told Shirley her mother had been kidnapped. Needless to say, he got a big finger-wagging from Shirley’s mother after learning of his deception. As for Shirley’s crying rule, she said, “crying is too hard after lunch.”

Christle makes it clear that there are perils to a white woman crying on and on. To be serious for a moment, the term “White Tears” means tears “which are shed by a white person who has been made suddenly aware of systemic racism, or her own implication within white supremacy.  They can be a form of defense against an imagined aggression, a way of shutting down a conversation…” Christle goes on to say that these kinds of tears are dangerous. “I do not want to redeem those tears. I want to read them for what they are and I want to read beyond them.”

Image via MaNdyBrasher

On a somewhat ridiculous note, did you know there are hotels in Japan where you can rent rooms just to cry? Did you also know, if you have the money, you can pay men to wipe away your tears? Some churches have crying rooms. There is also something called lachryphagy, which is the act of drinking tears, though I think that’s reserved for butterflies, moths, etc.

Another fact from the book: men and women often cry on planes. A survey found that 41 percent of men hide it by literally covering their face with a blanket while women pretend they have something in their eye.

 

The Book of Crying is full and ripe with rare facts but also filled with beautiful stories about the author’s personal journey through her ups and downs until she is diagnosed with cyclothymia, a lesser form of Bipolar Disorder. Again, she’s also pregnant throughout and gives birth towards the middle of the book. A lot is going on! The book is a tapestry of history, knowledge; it can be dark but then comes back up with funny musings over Yahoo!Answers, and sentences like, “despair makes us fall and a fall makes us laugh. Why?”

I can’t answer the question, I think it answers itself.


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Featured image via Mental Floss 

Tiger Woods to Tell His Story in New Memoir, ‘Back’

For better or worse, Tiger Woods has been in the spotlight quite a bit over the last decade. Back, his forthcoming memoir from HarperCollins, promises to be his “definitive story.”

 

 

After the meltdown of his marriage in 2010, the media’s portrayal of Tiger fell outside his control. He sees Back as a way of taking control of his life story again:

 

I’ve been in the spotlight for a long time, and because of that, there have been books and articles and TV shows about me, most filled with errors, speculative and wrong. This book is my definitive story. It’s in my words and expresses my thoughts. It describes how I feel and what’s happened in my life.

 

image via getty images

 

Back tells the epic story of Woods rise as a golf prodigy to his rise as the youngest Masters champion and the only player in history to hold all four major championships simultaneously. It gives readers an inside look into the highs and lows career, from injuries and high-profile personal issues that culminated into divorce to his comeback at age 43 to win the Masters.

 

 

Tiger Woods is one of the most successful pro golfers ever. With his 81 PGA titles, Tiger’s story is sure to interest any sports fan. He’s contributed to a couple other books—How I Play Golf (2001) and The 1997 Masters: My Story, a collaboration with Golf Digest in 2017—but Back will be the first time he’s told his own story, through and through.

 

 

Featured image via Kevin Cox, Getty Images

Julie Andrews Will Voice Her New Memoir’s Audiobook

Earlier today Entertainment Weekly reported that Julie Andrews, known as the iconic leading lady in both Mary Poppins and The Sound of Music, will voice the audiobook version of her forthcoming memoir Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years.

 

Image via Goodreads

 

This isn’t Andrews’ first venture into the world of writing. Previously, the actress published Home: A Memoir of My Early Years, a work that explores her difficult upbringing and earliest experiences with performing.

Home Work picks up where Home left off,  in the 60’s, when Andrews was cast by Walt Disney as the “world’s most famous nanny.”

 

 

And who better to tell her story of success than Andrews herself? Among her other talents, Andrews is often recognized by her voice. Her soothing lilt, and posh accent, is a sound that many have come to associate with childhood comfort. Children who grew up on Mary Poppins, as well as children who grew up on The Princess Diaries, all think of Andrews with the same kind of childlike love. Her career has endured for so long, she’s earned her status as Hollywood’s doting mother.

 

Image via The Irish Times

 

Home Work provides a behind-the-scenes look at the career that thrusted Andrews into icon status. The actress shares anecdotes from the sets of her most iconic works, details you wouldn’t find anywhere else. Entertainment Weekly shared one snippet about how, on a rainy day, Andrews was forced to ride in the back of an ox-drawn cart full of camera equipment to get up the muddy Alps.

 

 

In her classic, Julie Andrews charm, the actress writes:

“I happened to be wearing a fur coat. It was the 1960s after all, and the humor in the contrast between my attire and the mode of transport wasn’t lost on any of us.”

Andrews’ memoir will hit shelves on October 15th, and the audiobook will be available the same day!

Featured Image Via Wikipedia 

Jim Carrey to Publish Book: ‘Memoirs and Misinformation’

Jim Carrey, the 90’s comedy star known for his starring roles in The Mask, Dumb and Dumber, and Liar Liar, is jumping into the writing world with his forthcoming work Memoirs and Misinformation. 

 

 

Carrey co-wrote the book with author Dana Vachon, and in a press release it was explained that the work is intended as a “semi-autobiographical deconstruction of persona.”

 

Image via Rolling Stone

 

In recent years, the idea of persona has become a bit of a theme for Carrey. He’s become known for going on diatribes centered on what it means to exist and be perceived by others.

 

 

This hasn’t been great for Carrey’s image, as people often associate the actor with their childhood nostalgia, and quotes like “We don’t exist, we are nothing but ideas,” don’t gel with the wacky, happy-go-lucky, goofball we all assumed Jim Carrey was.

 

Image via ETOnline

 

This, combined with Carrey’s habit of being very vocal on social media about his political beliefs, has earned the actor a bit of a negative reputation. However, this hasn’t effected Carrey’s acting opportunities, and he starred as Dr. Eggman in the upcoming Sonic the Hedgehog movie.

His reputation will also serve as a selling point for Memoirs and Misinformation, as this press release statement hints at;

“Carrey and Vachon have fashioned a narrative about acting, Hollywood, agents, celebrity, privilege, friendship, loneliness, romance, addiction to relevance, fear of personal erasure, growing up in Canada, and a cataclysmic ending of the world — apocalypses within and without.”

 

 

Sonny Mehta, the Editor in Chief for the book publisher, Alfred A. Knopf, added, “Jim Carrey has written a novel that is more revealing about his life than any memoir could possibly be. It is a perceptive and highly entertaining book about the arc of fame, as well as a look inside the mind of an artist, the life that shaped him, and the world he inhabits.”

And in classic Jim Carrey fashion, when asked about the work he stated, “None of this is real, and it’s all true.”

Memoirs and Misinformation will be available in both hardcover and ebook form on May 5, 2020.

 

 

 

Featured image via The Wrap

Chelsea Handler’s Memoir is Being Brought to TV… Again

Chelsea Handler, comedian, actress, and talk show host, is returning to the small screen with a TV series based on her memoirLife Will be the Death of Me… And You Too.

 

Chelsea HandlerImage via The Cheat Sheet

 

Handler has been working in the entertainment business for nearly 20 years, and has garnered many tales from her journey to stardom. Her E! Network talk show, Chelsea Lately, however, is what made her a household name. It was there that fans fell in love with her dry humor, and sharp wit.

 

 

On top of this, Handler was known for being very candid about her life, entertaining viewers with stories of her wild youth and equally wild adulthood (including the dirty details about her romantic relationship with rapper 50 Cent).

 

Chelsea Handler in High SchoolChelsea Handler in high school/Image via Business Insider

 

Handler, seeing the love people have for her hilarious antics, has now written six books centered around her life, of which Life Will be the Death of Me is the most recent.

 

 

This also isn’t the first time that one of Handler’s book has been adapted for television. Previously, Handler’s memoir Are You There, Vodka? It’s me, Chelsea was made into the show Are You There, Chelsea? The show was a scripted comedy that followed the trials and tribulations of a female bartender in her 20’s, and it ran for one season.

Despite being cancelled so quickly, Are You There Chelsea? featured a star-studded cast and Handler’s iconic brand of no-bs humor. Fans hope this new show will achieve the same effect, while also making up for some of the shortcomings that led to Are you There Chelsea?‘s cancellation.

 

 

 

 

Featured image via Hollywood Reporter