Tag: mary shelley

Top Three Frankenstein Memes

Did you ever drop out of school to create unnatural life? No? Then live vicariously through Victor Frankenstein, a totally real and not unethical doctor!

Treat the invention of science fiction with exactly none of the reverence it deserves, and feast your eyes (stolen or not) on these Frankenstein memes.

 

1. For the Pedant in Your Life

 

 Image via Know Your Meme

 

Oh, so the ‘Doctor’ didn’t give his child his name? Sure, a first name would have been polite, but at the very least, can’t we call him Monster Frankenstein, son of Victor Frankenstein? I’m just saying, just because Vicky doesn’t bother, doesn’t mean they’re not both Frankensteins. And as the ever quotable John Mulaney says, “just because you’re accurate doesn’t mean you’re interesting”. Next time someone tells you the monster’s name wasn’t Frankenstein, tell them any of this. Or strangle them. (Don’t do that).

 

 

2. When You Misunderstand the Instructions… Pretty Badly

 

Image via ImgFlip

 

I mean, sure. He definitely didn’t do what they had in mind. Definitely. But can he really be disqualified? He definitely built a stronger body, no one said it had to be his own. Somebody check the fine print. Anyone who’s ever had their homework handed back because they did the assignment just completely wrong will relate. Do we think this is the secret reason he left school? They told him to write an essay on human organs and he brought in a bunch of organs with writing on them? I’m just saying, maybe take it easy, man.

 

 

3. An Actual John Mulaney Meme This Time

Image via Tumblr

 

I swear I didn’t plan this. But  we’ve had a lot of these no/yes, broke/woke meme formats, and I consider this a good addition to the art form. And I mean… it’s true. I’m not a parent, so maybe I shouldn’t be shaming anyone for their methods, but I think in this case foresight is as accurate as hindsight would be. Like…Do not follow the doctor’s lead on this. Plus, have you ever tried to learn French? The hyphens alone make ME have nervous fevers, and he did it in one year. Whether he’s a monster may be in question, but either way he’s an absolute beast.

 

 

 

Featured image via Memebase 

Top Quotes to Celebrate Mary Shelley’s 222nd Birthday!

I personally enjoy Young Frankenstein the most out of all Frankenstein related things (You are missed, Gene Wilder). However, it goes without saying that Mary Shelley crafted a masterpiece that defined various genres, and transcends English-class-required-reading-curriculums because of its epic scope and intimate insights into the human psyche.

The following quotes and excerpts include some of Shelley’s greatest insights:

 

 

Image via NYTimes

 

 

“Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.”

 


 

“The beginning is always today.”

 


 

“Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.”

 


 

“No man chooses evil because it is evil; he only mistakes it for happiness, the good he seeks.”

 


 

“How dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge and how much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to be greater than his nature will allow.”

 


 

“Once I falsely hoped to meet the beings who, pardoning my outward form, would love me for the excellent qualities which I was capable of unfolding.”

 


 

“Nothing contributes so much to tranquilize the mind as a steady purpose.”

 


 

“Thus strangely are our souls constructed, and by slight ligaments are we bound to prosperity and ruin.”

 


 

“My dreams were all my own; I accounted for them to nobody; they were my refuge when annoyed—my dearest pleasure when free.”

 


 

“Invention, it must be humbly admitted, does not consist in creating out of void, but out of chaos.”

 

 

 

 

Featured Image via The Great Courses Daily

 

7 Hair-Raising Facts About Mary Shelley

Mary Shelley, everyone’s favorite badass horror author, is having a birthday on August 30th!

Here are seven of the most spook-tastic facts about the woman who wrote Frankenstein!

 

 

1. Mary Shelley lost her v-card in a graveyard

 

An 18th century graveyardImage via City-Data

 

I, personally, can’t think of anything more goth.

She is also said to have been 16-years-old at the time, which led to rumors about the young writer to start a-flying, something that her father found to be deeply shameful.

 

2. She also lost her V-Card to a married man

 

Percy ShelleyImage via Wikipedia

 

This is Percy Shelley, the man who did the deed.

At the time of said deed Percy was married to a young woman named Harriet Westbrook. He was also older than Mary by about six years.

Now that’s some good tea.

 

 

3. The same man left his pregnant wife to be with Mary

 

Harriet and PercyImage via Word Press

 

And the tea gets hotter still. Harriet Westbrook was pregnant when Percy Shelley left her for Mary. Goths win every time.

 

4. Some believe that Shelley’s father killed Her Lover’s pregnant Ex-wife

 

William GodwinImage via Wikipedia

 

The hottest of the teas. Harriet was found dead in a river soon after Percy left her for Mary. The official cause of death is suicide, but that didn’t stop rumors from spreading.

Many people believe that William Godwin, Mary’s father, murdered Harriet in order to protect his daughters public image.

#DadOfTheYear

 

5. Mary wrote Frankenstein on a dare

 

Frankenstein's monsterImage via Smithsonian Magazine

 

Mary was spending a night with friends, reading spooky stories and sharing tales of the supernatural, when they challenged each other to write ghost stories of their own.

Mary took this challenge to heart, though she struggled to arrive at a concept that excited her.

When she had a nightmare about a doctor re-animating a corpse, Frankenstein was born.

 

6. Shelley was 19 when she began writing Frankenstein

 

Mary ShelleyImage via Biography.com

 

Frankenstein was published when Shelley was 22, but she began writing the horror classic at the age of 19.

Many people believe that she was able to write at such a young age because she was incredibly talented, I think that’s what happens when you’re a natural born goth.

 

 

7. Shelley kept her late husband’s calcified heart

 

Image via The British Library

 

At the age of 29, Percy Shelley drowned after his boat was caught in a storm. When his body was cremated it appeared that his heart was unable to burn due to an earlier bout of tuberculosis.

At this point in her life, Mary Shelley had experienced the deaths of two of her three children, and was unfortunately familiar with the grieving process. However, she didn’t handle her grief in the way you’d expect. After her death, her only surviving son cleared out her desk to find not only Percy’s heart, but locks of hair from her late children as well.

Once again, goth queen.

 

 

 

 

Featured image via The Spectator and Design Tutsplus

Color photo of Frankenstein's monster looking upwards

5 Differences Between ‘Frankenstein’ and the Film Adaptations

Frankenstein or, The Modern Prometheus, by Mary Shelley is hailed as the first real science-fiction novel. Following Dr. Victor Frankenstein, it chronicles Frankenstein’s journey to create life and his clash with his creation after he succeeds. Touching on themes of ambition, lost of innocence, revenge, humanity, responsibility and creattion,  Frankenstein is a dense but very worthwhile classic of its genre. However, it unfortunately has been largely displaced in the popular consciousness by its film adaptations. To celebrate its publication anniversary, here are five facts about Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and its many differences to work that adapted its spooky tale.

 

Victor Frankenstein stands contemplating the sea in the cover to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
Image Via Goodreads

1. The Framing Device

The original novel uses a framing device to tell its story. Captain Walton, a sailor in the arctic, picks up Victor Frankenstein on the ice and brings him aboard his ship. There, Frankenstein tells the tale of how he got here, turning the entire book into one long flashback. The Creature confronts Captain Walton at the end, vowing it will destroy itself via funeral pyre. However, Captain Walton is a character who is very rarely adapted, the framing device being almost entirely omitted from films based on or inspired by the book.

 

Fritz, played by Dwight Fyre, threatens the Monster, played by Boris Karloff with a burning torch
Image Via Telegraph

2. There was no Igor

Dr. Frankenstein’s hunchbacked assistant, Igor, is purely a creation of popular culture. In the original novel, Frankenstein worked entirely alone, creating the monster in a hidden room at his college. He kept the experiment entirely secret and had no outside help at all. The character of an assistant first appeared in 1931’s Frankenstein film in the form of Fritz, before being codified, ironically enough, by Mel Brook’s spoof film Son of Frankenstein.

 

Frankenstein confronts his creation in a 1934 illustration from the novel
Image Via Goodreads

3. The Monster Speaks

The Monster is a very different character from the mute, lumbering brute that was made famous in the Universal Horror films. Although he begins as a borderline feral creature after his ‘birth’, the Monster slowly learns language and reasoning over the course of the novel. He becomes extremely intelligent and articulate, often spending pages contemplating his unnatural existence. He even learns how to make clothes and uses weapons to defend himself as he survives in the wilderness. Compared to his film counterpart, he’s a wholly different beast.

 

Victor Frankenstein and Fritz standing over the Monster on the slab, preparing to give it life
Image Via BBC

4. The Creation is Offscreen

Doubtlessly one of the most famous in cinema is the creation of Frankenstein’s monster. Everything about it is iconic, from the slab the monster rests upon to the flashing laboratory equipment to the bolt of lightning that brings him to life to Frankenstein proclaiming “Its alive, its alive!” But the sequence in question actually isn’t in the original novel! Yes, the creation of the Monster in the book is entirely offscreen and left to the reader’s imagination. Oddly, this makes it more compelling to the imagination…how did Frankenstein do it? We’ll never know but it certainly makes good food for thought.

 

Victor Frankenstein leans over the inert form of the monster in his lab
Image Via Collider

5. Frankenstein Dies

In the novel, Victor Frankenstein pays for his hubris. After trekking the Monster to the Arctic, he collapses on the ice and is rescued by Captain Walton. But it is too late for him and after telling the Captain his story, he expires. Subsequent adaptations have spared Frankenstein his untimely demise, doubtlessly to keep a relatively happy ending.

What are your favorite moments from the book that didn’t make it to the screen?

 

Featured Image Via YouTube

Mary Shelley

10 Quotes from the Distinguished Mary Shelley

I have to say, one of my fondest memories of college was when my professor (Professor English and yes that was his name) assigned us to read Mary Shelley’s classic novel, Frankenstein. The dark and beautiful work has stood the test of time and become one of the most famous works of literature the world has seen. It simply came from a competition amongst peers as to who could write the best horror story. Shelley even published it anonymously; it wasn’t until the second edition that everyone discovered it was her.

 

This woman broke boundaries and her success ran even with her husband’s, which, at that time, was surprising. Today is her 221st birthday, but this author should have a special place in our memory no matter what day it is. Here are ten quotes by the distinguished Mary Shelley.
 

 

 
1. “Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.”

 


 

2. “Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.”

 


 

3. “Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.”

 


 

4. “No man chooses evil because it is evil; he only mistakes it for happiness, the good he seeks.”

 


 

 
5. “I do know that for the sympathy of one living being, I would make peace with all. I have love in me the likes of which you can scarcely imagine and rage the likes of which you would not believe. If I cannot satisfy the one, I will indulge the other.”

 


 

6. “How dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge and how much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to be greater than his nature will allow.”

 


 

7. “The beginning is always today.”

 


 

8. “The companions of our childhood always possess a certain power over our minds which hardly any later friend can obtain.”

 


 

9. “Invention, it must be humbly admitted, does not consist in creating out of void but out of chaos.”

 


 

10. “The world to me was a secret, which I desired to discover; to her it was a vacancy, which she sought to people with imaginations of her own.”
 

 

 

 

Image Via GIPHY

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Womensprizeforfiction.co