Tag: louisa may alcott

Aunt's and Uncle's Day

Aunts and Uncles in Literature: The Good, the Bad, and the Downright Evil

To celebrate National Aunt's and Uncle's Day here is a list of the best aunts and uncles found in literature!

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Did You Notice This ‘Little Women’ Blunder?

The tale of on-screen modernity in a period setting is age-old. We all remember the infamous coffee cup in Game of Thrones, right? No matter how many times we see it, it never loses entertainment value, and Little Women became the next victim of an editing oversight and eagle-eyed viewers. 

One such viewer (and fan), Madelyn Rancourt, took to Vine-reminiscent platform TikTok to show her findings. Her video, reaching 20.7k likes since its upload, highlights the Hydroflask that rests on a surface behind Timothée Chalamet’s Laurie. 

 

@madelynrancourtanyone else notice this? ##fyp ##foryou ##littlewomen ##hydroflask ##timothéechalamet♬ Little Women – Alexandre Desplat

Madelyn’s eye was matched with that of many twitter users, who have been sharing the viral stills, with hilarious comments, of course. 

 

Sony Pictures has not commented on the screen slip-up, but beyond “oops” what could they really say? I was not left wanting for entertainment after seeing Little Women *ahem* twice, but it really is the gift that keeps on giving. 

feature image via dailydot

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The Academy’s Little problem with Women

Greta Gerwig’s adaption of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women hit screens everywhere in December of last year. Three weeks on, it seems the film is headed for total success. With wide acclaim and a Rotten Tomatoes score of 95%, it’s unsurprising that The Academy has been paying attention, and it’s clear they LOVE it, nominating Little Women for six Oscars, including best picture and best actress. This comes as a welcome result considering the movie’s lack of appearance in the Golden Globe‘s best picture category.

 

image via refinery29

Sadly, unlike 2018, Greta Gerwig was not among the list of best directors, a list that was problematically entirely male. This highlights a bigger problem in Hollywood’s reportedly sexist culture. Greta Gerwig scripted an incredible adaption of a classic book, pulled together her powerhouse of a cast and kept Alcott’s core messages throughout. Some would argue that she deserves an award for bringing Saoirse Ronan and Timothée Chalamet together on screen again alone – but that might just be me. Despite all of this, she was snubbed when the nominations were released earlier this week. If Greta Gerwig couldn’t make the cut, it begs the question of what criteria is being considered.

 

image via statista

When Louisa May Alcott penned Little Women, the rebellious and enduring nature of the March sisters is part of what made the novel so brilliant and Greta Gerwig is no stranger to rebellion nor endurance, creating and existing as she does in a male-dominated film environment. It’s not all doom and patriarchal gloom, though. In speaking to Vanity Fair, the producer of the film, Amy Pascal, pointed out that Little Women was the “third movie in the history of the Academy that has been nominated [for best picture] that has been written, directed, and produced by women.” That, in and of itself, is proof that Hollywood’s problems (much like our own) may lessen with age. 

 

 

One of the core messages in Little Women, particularly in the movie, is the importance of writing, reading, and learning (oh my!). Spoilers are incoming for those of you fortunate enough not to know this!! When Beth gets sick, her illness is something that Jo hopes to aid with fresh sea air and a good story. Tragically, the plot alone is not enough to save Beth but the stories Jo writes for her are a comfort in her time of need. I think we can all agree that the comfort of a favorite story is no small thing and with Little Women being that favorite for so many people, the novel and film are self-fulfilling. Gerwig credits Little Women for giving her the inspiration to write and create, the film a passion project that no Oscar could ever overshadow.

 

moe’s book club via tumblr

Despite the gender politics, the movie looks set to surpass box office records and hopefully take home some, if not all, its prospective awards at the Oscars. Gerwig may not have a directorial nomination to celebrate, but the film has the best picture prospects alongside potential accolades for Saoirse Ronan and Florence Pugh.

As Jo put it herself: “Women, they have minds, and they have souls as well as just hearts, and they’ve got ambition, and they’ve got talent, as well as just beauty”. Academy, make a note.

 

 

Featured Image Via Britannica


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First Official Look at Greta Gerwig’s ‘Little Women’

If you’ve been counting down the days to Christmas not for Santa but for the latest Little Women adaptation, Vanity Fair has brought it to you early! Who said you can’t have a piece of Christmas joy in June, anyway? With exclusive interviews and behind-the-scenes shoots, you can get your first look at Greta Gerwig’s Little Women.

 

Since Ladybird took everyone by storm with stars Saoirse Ronan and Timothée Chalamet, everyone has been asking what Gerwig would do to follow up that masterpiece. Well, she is once again taking Ronan and Chalamet on her journey into Louisa May Alcott’s 19th Century novel, Little Women as Jo and Laurie. Joining them are Emma Watson (Meg), Meryl Streep (Aunt Josephine), Laura Dern (Marmee), Eliza Scanlan (Beth), and Florence Pugh (Amy).

 

Cast of 'Little Women' Watson, Ronan, Scanlan, Pugh, Chalamet

image via le bleu du miroir

If you’re rolling your eyes and asking yourself if we need another 19th century take on the world, don’t fret. Gerwig, though keeping the adaption true to Alcott’s work, will be adding in modern twists. According to IndieWire, Gerwig is committed to shooting scenes in Massachusetts, not far from where the Alcott family lived, including scenes at the schoolhouse where her father taught.

 

Saoirse and Timothée as Jo and Laurie

image via slash film

One major aspect that Gerwig is diving into is the relationship between Jo, a girl with a traditional boy’s name, and Laurie, a boy with a traditional girl’s name. According to Gerwig, “In some ways the two are each other’s twin.” To heighten that relationship, she worked closely with the costume’s department. Throughout the film the two will swap pieces of clothing or accessories. Gerwig explains:

They find each other before they’ve committed to a gender. It wouldn’t be wrong to call Saoirse handsome and Timothée beautiful. Both have a slightly androgynous quality that makes them perfect for these characters.

Seeing how Gerwig plans to approach this relationship, it makes me excited to think of all the other themes she will be modernizing in the film. If you’ve seen Ladybird, you know Gerwig has an eye for detail, an amazing one at that. Christmas can’t come soon enough.

featured image via abc news