Tag: Listicle

5 Quotes To Help You Kick Your NaNoWriMo Slump

With the month winding down and NaNoWriMo writers working to reach their respective 50,000 word goals, it should come as no surprise that many of these NaNo participants are experiencing a writer’s slump. Some of these individuals might be dealing with deadlines that relate to school, or perhaps work is taking its toll as the holidays fast approach. Or maybe it’s just good old fashioned writer’s block — the scourge of all writers.

Regardless, this is the time of the month where NaNo writers are confronted by their exhaustion, and they have to make the choice to keep working towards their goals or to call it good for the year. To keep you going, here are five quotes from writers to encourage you to keep working on your NaNo project.

1. “If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” – Toni Morrison

Image via Film at Lincoln center

Toni Morrison, author of Beloved and The Bluest Eye, is a Nobel Prize recipient and the writer of more than ten books.

 

2. “The first draft is just you telling yourself the story.” – Sir Terry Pratchett

Image via Britannica.com

While alive, Terry Pratchett wrote over 40 books. His impressive bibliography includes titles like Good Omens (co-written with Neil Gaiman) and the Discworld series.

 

3. “Do not hoard what seems good for a later place in the book, or for another book; give it, give it all, give it now.” – Annie dillard

image via the Nation

Annie Dillard is a Pulitzer Prize winner and the writer of books like The Writing Life and Living By Fiction. She has dabbled in multiple literary styles– everything from poetry to prose, and from fiction to nonfiction.

 

4. “It’s such a confidence trick, writing a novel. The main person you have to trick into confidence is yourself.” – Zadie Smith

image via Brain Pickings

Zadie Smith has been listed on Granta’s 20 Best Young British Novelists on two separate occasions. She is a recipient of the Orange Prize for Fiction award and a member of the Royal Society of Literature. She wrote the novels White Teeth and On Beauty.

 

5. “Many stories matter. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity.” – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

image via Nbc News

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has been rewarded the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, the Hurston/Wright Legacy award, and the Orange Prize. She wrote the novels Americanah and Half of A Yellow Sun

Featured Image Via Pinterest

 

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Dive into These New Biographies and Great Personal Stories!

 

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are new biographies for you to dig into and be inspired! Dig in and enjoy!

 

5. The Man in the glass House by Mark Lamster

 

image via amazon

 

The Man in the Glass House by Mark Lamster tells the story of the most famous architect in the 20th Century: Philip Johnson. Award-winning architectural critic and biographer Mark Lamster’s The Man in the Glass House lifts the veil on Johnson’s controversial and endlessly contradictory life to tell the story of a charming yet deeply flawed man. A rollercoaster tale of the perils of wealth, privilege, and ambition, this book probes the dynamics of American culture that made him so powerful, and tells the story of the built environment in modern America.

 

4. Who Am I again? by Lenny Henry

 

image via amazon

 

Who Am I Again? by Lenny Henry tells the extraordinary story of his early years and sudden rise to fame. Born soon after his Jamaican parents had arrived in the Midlands, Lenny was raised as one of seven siblings in a boisterous working household, and sent out into the world with his mum’s mantra of ‘H’integration! H’integration! H’integration!’ echoing in his ears. A natural ability to make people laugh came in handy. At school it helped subdue the daily racist bullying. In the park, it led to lifelong friendships and occasional snogs. Soon, it would put him on stage at working men’s clubs and Black Country discotheques—before an invitation to a TV audition changed his life for ever.

 

3. they don’t teach this by Eniola Aluko

 

image via Amazon

 

They Don’t Teach This by Eniola Aluko steps beyond the realms of memoir to explore themes of dual nationality and identity, race and institutional prejudice, success, failure and faith. It is an inspiring manifesto to change the way readers and the future generation choose to view the challenges that come in their life, applying life lessons with raw truths from Eni’s own personal experience.

 

2. 1919 by Eve L. eWing

 

image via Amazon

 

1919 by Eve L. Ewing tells of The Chicago Race Riot of 1919, the most intense of the riots comprising the nation’s Red Summer, which shaped the last century but is not widely discussed. In 1919, award-winning poet Eve L. Ewing explores the story of this event—which lasted eight days and resulted in thirty-eight deaths and almost 500 injuries—through poems recounting the stories of everyday people trying to survive and thrive in the city. Ewing uses speculative and Afrofuturist lenses to recast history, and illuminates the thin line between the past and the present.

 

1. Kd by Marcus Thompson 

 

image via Amazon

 

KD by Marcus Thompson traces the famous journey of Kevin Durant. As a sports columnist for The Athletic Bay Area, and longtime beat reporter covering the Golden State Warriors, Marcus Thompson is perfectly positioned to trace Durant’s inspirational journey. KD follows Durant’s underdog story from his childhood spent in poverty outside DC; to his rise playing on AAU teams with future NBA players; to becoming a star and hometown hero for the Oklahoma Thunder; to his controversial decision to play for the NBA rival Golden State Warriors; to his growth from prodigy into a man, in the first true inside account of this superstar player.

 

Featured Image Via Amazon 

 

7 Hauntingly Horrible Halloween Costumes

Halloween is almost upon us! Or, at the very least, the time to plan ahead for Halloween is almost upon us!

It can be tempting to pick a costume based on one of your favorite characters, or a costume that really amps up the sex appeal. In order to save you from some spooky strife this season, here are some of literary characters you definitely should NOT dress up as this Halloween.

1. The Cat in the Hat (The Cat in the hat)

 

Image via Yandy

 

I had never heard of Yandy before I began compiling this list, but they seem to specialize in the sexualization of characters no one wanted to see in a sexual context. They also seem to only have one model. Get acquainted with her, she’s in a lot of these.

 

 

2. Alex (A ClockWork Orange)

 

Image via Popscreen

 

One of the many themes in A Clockwork Orange is the overexposure to pornography and sexual violence in our society. I’m not sure that Anthony Burgess would really appreciate this version of his iconic anti-hero.

Also, Alex is 15. In the movie adaptation he appears to be closer to 20, but the age discrepancy still seems worth mentioning.

 

3. OOmpa Loompa (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory)

 

Image via Buzzfeed

Why, Yandy? Why?

 

 

4. HandMaid (The Handmaid’s Tale)

 

Image via Bustle

I don’t need to explain why this one is problematic. You get it.

 

5. Hannibal Lector (Silence of the Lambs)

 

Image via Yandy

Yandy strikes again. If the lambs had stopped screaming, I think they’d start up again after seeing this.

 

6. Pippi Longstocking (Pippi Longstocking)

 

Image via Tattoopins

Considering that this Pippi is much less sexually charged than many of the ‘child character gone adult’ costumes, I think the most egregious thing about this particular outfit are the heels. Very bold to pair your office pumps with your Raggedy Ann dress.

 

 

7. The Grinch (How The grinch Stole Christmas)

 

Image via Yandy

This one is barely even a costume. It’s just green. You could switch that Grinch hat out for a Shrek hat and no one notice the difference.

Plus, there doesn’t need to be a sexy version of the Grinch, he’s already sexy enough…

 

Image via Tenor

Featured Image Via Yandy 

10 Wholesome Reminders That Stephen King is a Sleepy Twitter Dad

It’s only three months into 2019, and nothing can keep marathon novelist Stephen King off Twitter, a medium he wields to broadcast his inner thoughts, book reviews, and political criticism. You may remember he recently Tweeted a viral response to a USA Today headline that mentioned fellow writer Tabitha King not by name but simply by “his wife”—an offensive error the Kings corrected with their usual poignancy.

Aside from biting clap-backs and no-frills political hot takes, King’s Tweeting trends—which range from cheering on his friends and family to documenting the day-to-day life of his corgi—remind us that behind the author and his soapbox is a Sunday-morning, half-awake dad who’ll do anything to embarrass his kids, one who can’t get enough of his mischievous, short-legged corgi. This lovable dad content with corresponding dad typos speaks deeply to the dad in all of us. Here are 10 of King’s latest inspiring Tweets to kickstart your weekend and cleanse your soul.

 

1. correct punctuation can’t get in the way of supporting your heroes

 

2. fashion: I don’t really understand it, do you?

3. Binge-watch & thrills

4. #DadContent 

5. turning twitter into #dogstagram

6. I love you, son! have a great day at school!

7. *corgi content intensifies*

8. making classic dad impulse purchases

9. Tragic: empty nest devastates bangor writer

10. dad-level sap

 

Featured image via Inc.com