Tag: lgbtq

3 Inspiring Queer Bookstores Across the World

For years queer bookstores have served as community centers for members of the LGBTQ+ community to meet and discuss literature, films and other art forms in a safe space created just for them. Now, as more queer writers produce more and more queer literature, these bookshops remain a place to gather and find a community for members of the community and allies alike all around the world.

 

 

Gay’s the Word, London

 

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Image via Diva Magazine

Opening in 1797, Gay’s the Word has hosted the Lesbian Discussion Group and the Gay Black Group for years. Located in Central London’s Bloomsbury, this shop continues its mission of inclusion and discussion. The catchy name comes from a 1951 West End musical produced by Ivor Novello and Alan Melville.

 

 

Les Mots à la Bouche, Paris

 

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Image via VINGT Paris

Located in the heart of Paris’ queer neighborhood is Les Mots à la Bouche. This book shop (roughly translating to “at the tip of the tongue”) focuses on archival material. In addition to its large selection of current fiction and nonfiction, Les Mots à la Bouche also houses historical relics including comics, DVDs and magazines. Tourists rejoice as many of these relics are offered in English so Americans on a queer lit holiday may rejoice in these relics with their French counterparts.

 

 

Prinz Eisenherz Buchladen, Berlin

 

Image result for Prinz Eisenherz Buchladen, Berlin

 

Image Via GayCities Berlin

Located in the central Schöneberg area, Berlin’s resident queer bookshop was opened in 1978 as a way to make queer literature and content commonplace in Berlin’s book scene. After three moves and a constantly growing collection, the center now prides itself on its extensive collection of fiction, zines, autobiographies, and films that serves as the center of Germany’s queer scene.

 

Featured Image via World Literature Today

LGBTQ Books Are Being Censored and Authors Are Fighting Back

According to Entertainment Weekly Middle Schools across the country are resisting teaching LGBTQ material in the classroom. One incident occurred with an author called Jen-Petro Roy, who had booked a trip to Texas in order to talk with students about her book, P.S. I Miss You.

 

P.S. I Miss You

Image Via Goodreads

 

The novel follows an eleven year old girl who begins questioning her faith and sexuality, discovering she may not be straight and what that means for her identity. But, out of the blue, the school cancelled the scheduled visit.

According to Roy, the school had decided that by featuring her work, they’d be promoting an LGBT ‘agenda’ and she didn’t end up going to Texas after all. This is only the latest in a long string of controversies in children’s literature. Despite children’s books pushing forward with progressive attitudes, many LGBTQ voices are being silenced.

 

Image via Entertainment Weekly

Authors all over the country have noted they are suffering from being banned from even discuss LGBTQ material and many feel like they’re being gaslit. Schools often give excuses for teachers writing this material to not appear, making excuses that include scheduling conflicts or students study time. She describes this practice as ‘soft censorship’ and notes its really quite troubling, essentially enacting a ban on what literature young people are exposed to. She discovered parents had become upset at her for featuring pride flags on social media and they complained to the school, which likely helped make the decision.

 

Renegades

Image Via Amazon

 

The author further noted that bans might get more attention for the schools, making it extra motivation to allow them to get media attention they wouldn’t otherwise receive. Anonymous employees for schools revealed they had pulled books they did not ‘line up’ with school values, with nearly one third being tossed out or banned. For example: Renegades was banned because the main character has two dads.

The authors noted that kids are suffering the most for this and that this banning of content will ultimately hurt kids in the future. What do you think of these schools and their policies? Tell us in the comments.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Barnes And Noble 

Seven Queer Web Comics for You and Your Significant Other

Like comics? Like queer stuff? Like awesome, beautiful, and well plotted stories? Here are some fantastic web comics featuring gay, lesbian, asexual, and trans characters. Weather you’re reading for the representation or because you just like good comics, jump in and enjoy.

 

1. Muted

 

Image via Webtoon

 

It’s your favorite girl gang, coming at you from the Louisiana swamp. We’ve got parties. We’ve got blood magic. We’ve got developing lesbianism. We’ve got cute animals. Powerful witch families play off each other in this lush, grounded fantasy.

 

 

2. The Croaking

 

Image via Webtoon

 

Oh my god, they’re roommates. They meet over the summer, and then find out on their first day of special agent academy that they’re roommates. Feuds, favoritism, and friendships, plus uneasy edging into trust. Not to miss.

 

 

3. Sylvania

 

Image via Webtoon

 

We’ve got witches again, but who’s mad? The Mars colony wants to start growing plants, so a team is recruited to get water and trees going. A family that thinks it would be crazy to leave the forest is actually… all pretty into the idea. Space witches!

 

 

4. Novae

 

Image via ComicsVerse

 

Do you love space? Do you love necromancy? The two meet in this story about a gay astronomy student and a gay ace necromancer. Gorgeously illustrated and gorgeously soft, this period piece is a must read for anyone who wants a feel-good story.

 

5. Dylan & Angeline

 

Image via PixZing

 

Dylan’s got a new name, a supportive family, and a new school, plus a cute new classmate. It’s adorable stuff, and aside from a bureaucratic mess up, there’s no fuss about him being trans. Plus he has an adorable baby sister, and the sibling dynamics are on point.

 

 

6. Facing the Sun

 

Image via Webtoon

 

This is a little more emo. Something bad happens, and the character’s mother makes a support robot for her that she gets quite attached to. The robot starts glitching, or maybe just evolving? Deeply interesting art and moody pacing make this an engrossing ride.

 

 

7. Lorem Ipsum

Image via Tapas

 

After knowing each other their whole lives, these two stop seeing each other in college. When the younger one graduates, he goes to stay with his ‘big brother’. Talk about the friend zone. But don’t worry, they’ll see sense.

 

 

Featured image BBC

Plaque Commemorates Oscar Wilde and Condemns Hate Crimes

A permanent rainbow plaque dedicated to Irish author and playwright Oscar Wilde was unveiled at Clapham Junction earlier this week to condemn hate crimes like the one that Oscar Wilde experienced in that spot.

 

Oscar Wilde colorized

Image Via Reddit

 

Wilde was a prolific writer in the late 1800s who, today, is best known for his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray. Unfortunately, he was prosecuted for criminal libel. While the charges were dropped, it was discovered he had been in a relationship with a man and thus, he was tried and convicted for “gross indecency”, ultimately serving hard labor, the maximum penalty, from 1895 to 1897.

After his release, he wrote his last work The Ballad of Reading Gaol before dying destitute in Paris at the age of forty-six.

 

 

Recently, a plaque was set up at the Clapham Junction that, at the bottom, states:

Wilde was forced to stand, handcuffed and in convict dress, on the ‘centre platform’ whilst being transported to Reading Gaol. He was soon recognized and became the object of jeering, spitting and abuse as the crowd gathered around him

It goes on to describe how Wilde cried each subsequent year around the time of this attack.

 

The plaque in full

Image Via Twitter

 

The plaque is not just intended to commemorate Oscar Wilde’s unjust conviction, and cruel treatment, but also, in the words of David Robson, chairman of Wandsworth LGBTQ+, the plaque is “an opportunity to reflect on how far the LGBTQ+ movement has come and honour those who have suffered“.

The plaque was part of a combined project by Wandsworth LGBTQ+ Forum and Studio Voltaire.

Notably, Robson also stated “I hope we begin to see Rainbow Plaques popping up all over the country as a result.”

We all do.

 

 

Featured Image Via Towleroad