Tag: Lesbian fiction

7 Books That Celebrate Female Sexuality

It’s officially the month of love, and as we learn from doctor/author Emily Nagoski, our most powerful sexual organ is actually located between our ears (not our legs). That’s why we chose to highlight these stimulating reads that inform and inspire us on a subject that doesn’t get enough attention: female sexuality. So, whether you’ve got a Valentine’s date lined up or plan to indulge in a little romance for one, these books will definitely get you in the mood!

 

1. ‘Come as you are’ by emily nagoski

IMAGE VIA AMAZON

Years and years of research on the female libido and we still lack a universal answer to the question of “what makes us tick”. Why? As Dr. Nagoski explains in this New York Times bestseller, there isn’t one. Unlike men, all women have unique sexualities that vary and are highly influenced by life’s complications like mood, setting, and body image. Understanding these elements and how to take control of them will transform your sexual wellbeing in ways you may never have thought possible!

 

2. ‘F*cked: Being sexually explorative and self-confident in a world that’s screwed’ by Corinne Fisher & krystyna Hutchinson

image via amazon

If you haven’t listened to Guys We F*cked: The Anti Slut-Shaming Podcast, then first of all, what are you doing?! Hosts and now debuting authors Corinne Fisher and Krystyna Hutchinson have tackled every subject under the umbrella of sexuality, from kinks and toys to trauma and shame. The best part? They laugh the whole way through… because let’s be honest, sex can be hilarious. These ladies are not for the faint of heart, so gear up and proceed with caution.

 

 

3. ‘She Comes first’ by Ian Kerner

image via amazon

This is one for women who date men (bless our souls). From sex therapist Ian Kerner comes “the thinking man’s guide to pleasuring a woman,” starring one particular act of foreplay that we can all agree deserves a spotlight. Buy this book for your boyfriends, husbands, friends, acquaintances… just any guy, really. Maybe not your coworker.

 

4. ‘Three Women’ by lisa taddeo

image via amazon

Slightly different from the previous books on this list, Taddeo takes a narrative approach to female sexuality by following the real lives of three American women over the span of eight years. One sleeps with her high school teacher, one cheats on a loveless marriage with an old flame, one has sex with other men in front of her husband: all will make you feel deeply connected to the trials of womanhood. Bold, messy, and real from start to finish, Three Women is an absolute must-read.

 

5. ‘Fear of flying’ by erica jong

image via amazon

It’s been nearly five decades since the iconic novel was first released and met with controversy typical of the time, but it is no less relevant today than it was then. The story follows fictional character Isadora Wing through a series of sexual fantasies and encounters that ultimately lead to some serious self-discovery. Her “fear of flying” applies both to traveling on planes and to existing free from the confines of traditional femininity, making Jong a pioneer of sexual liberation who paved the way for our modern Hannah Horvaths and Carrie Bradshaws.

 

 

6. ‘tipping the velvet’ by sarah waters

image via amazon

You simply can’t talk about lesbian fiction without mentioning Sarah Waters. Set in 1890s England, Tipping the Velvet is the coming of age story of Nan King, an oyster girl who falls in love with a male impersonator and enters an all-consuming affair that severely alters the rest of her adult life. Packed with juicy eroticism, gender-bending, and queer love, you won’t want to put this one down.

 

7. My Secret Garden’ by Nancy friday

image via amazon

Not to be confused with the classic children’s novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, Nancy Friday’s My Secret Garden is a collection of real women’s sexual fantasies gathered through letters and interviews. Originally published in 1973, this book faced its fair share of backlash from the conservative public for its shocking content, female masturbation being at the top of the list. There are some details that may make even the modern reader raise an eyebrow, including one woman’s fantasy about her neighbor’s dog. Have we piqued your curiosity yet?

Light a candle, pour a glass of wine, and crack open one of these exhilarating titles (or stimulate your senses with an audiobook version). Happy Galentine’s, ladies!

 

Featured image via Everyday Health

 

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5 Amazing 2019 Novels With Lesbian Leads

What’s Women’s History Month if we don’t shine a spotlight on our queer sisters? These books all feature a leading lesbian character, and were released this year. I am happy to say that there are many, but I made a little list of what I think are the most promising reads that you can have in your shelf! Goodreads and Book Riot inspired the selections. Take a look!

 

1. Listen by Kris Bryant

 

Book cover for Listen, featuring music note made of lovehearts

Image Via Amazon

 

Former child music prodigy Lily Croft spends most days in her home office crunching numbers and analyzing data as an actuary. Once she filled concert halls across the world, until the pressure got to be too much and forced her retreat. When her boss hands her a temporary assignment, Lily has to leave the safety of working from home to work with people at an office. She keeps her head down and stays focused, but one night on her way to the train station, she hears music wafting from The Leading Note and the life and feelings she suppressed for over a decade bubble up to the surface.

Lily is inexplicably drawn to Hope D’Marco, Leading Note’s gorgeous and brilliant founder. But falling for Hope and re-exploring her passion for music force Lily to face her past. Will she go back into hiding, or have the courage to confront the consequences of her past and present colliding?

 

2. Thorn by Anna Burke

 

 

Book cover for Thorne, feature a thorned black branch with a heart shaped drop of blood falling from a thorn

Image Via Amazon

 

On a cold day deep in the heart of winter, Rowan’s father returns from an ill-fated hunting trip bearing a single, white rose. The rose is followed by the Huntress, a figure out of legend. Tall, cruel, and achingly beautiful, she brings Rowan back with her to a mountain fastness populated solely by the creatures of the hunt. Rowan, who once scorned the villagers for their superstitions, now finds herself at the heart of a curse with roots as deep as the mountains, ruled by an old magic that is as insidious as the touch of the winter rose.

Torn between her family loyalties, her guilty relief at escaping her betrothal to the charming but arrogant Avery Lockland, and her complicated feelings for the Huntress, Rowan must find a way to break the curse before it destroys everything she loves. There is only one problem―if she can find a way to lift the curse, she will have to return to the life she left behind. And the only thing more unbearable than endless winter is facing a lifetime of springs without the Huntress.

 

3. Willa & Hesper by Amy Feltman

 

Book cover for Willa and Hesper featuring pastel colored watercolor painting of two girls in collared shirts with a citrus fruit hanging from a branch

Image via Amazon

 

Willa’s darkness enters Hesper’s light late one night in Brooklyn. Theirs is a whirlwind romance until Willa starts to know Hesper too well, to crawl into her hidden spaces, and Hesper shuts her out. She runs, following her fractured family back to her grandfather’s hometown of Tbilisi, Georgia, looking for the origin story that he is no longer able to tell. But once in Tbilisi, cracks appear in her grandfather’s history- and a massive flood is heading toward Georgia, threatening any hope for repair.

Meanwhile, heartbroken Willa is so desperate to leave New York that she joins a group trip for Jewish twentysomethings to visit Holocaust sites in Germany and Poland, hoping to override her emotional state. When it proves to be more fraught than home, she must come to terms with her past-the ancestral past, her romantic past, and the past that can lead her forward.

 

4. The Love & Lies of Rukhsana Ali by Sabina Khan

 

Book cover for The Love and Lies of Rukhsana Ali featuring the title set vertically down the body of a girl wearing black and looking sideways out of the picture, against a green background

Image Via Amazon

 

Seventeen-year-old Rukhsana Ali has always been fascinated by the universe around her and the laws of physics that keep everything in order. But her life at home isn’t so absolute.

Unable to come out to her conservative Muslim parents, she keeps that part of her identity hidden. And that means keeping her girlfriend, Ariana, a secret from them too. Luckily, only a few more months stand between her carefully monitored life at home and a fresh start at Caltech in the fall. But when Rukhsana’s mom catches her and Ariana together, her future begins to collapse around her.

Devastated and confused, Rukhsana’s parents whisk her off to stay with their extended family in Bangladesh where, along with the loving arms of her grandmother and cousins, she is met with a world of arranged marriages, religious tradition, and intolerance. Fortunately, Rukhsana finds allies along the way and, through reading her grandmother’s old diary, finds the courage to take control of her future and fight for her love.

A gritty novel that doesn’t shy away from the darkest corners of ourselves, The Love and Lies of Rukhsana Ali provides a timely and achingly honest portrait of what it’s like to grow up feeling unwelcome in your own culture and proves that love, above all else, has the power to change the world.

 

5. Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy: A Graphic Novel: A Modern Retelling of Little Women by Rey Terciero & Bre Indigo

 

Book cover for Meg, Jo Beth and Amy, featuring a polaroid of the four characters sitting on stairs

Image Via Amazon

 

Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy are having a really tough year: Not only is their father overseas with the military and their working overtime to make ends meet, but each girl is struggling with her own unique problems. Whether it’s school woes, health issues, boy troubles, or simply feeling lost, the March sisters all need the same thing: support from each other. By coming together–and sharing lots of laughs and tears–these four young women find the courage to discover who they truly are as individuals…and as a family.

Meg is the eldest March. She has a taste for the finer things in life–especially when it comes to clothes and parties–and dreams of marrying rich and leaving her five-floor walk-up apartment behind.

Jo pushes her siblings to be true to themselves, yet feels like no one will accept her for who she truly is. Her passion for writing gives her an outlet to feel worthy in the eyes of her friends and family.

Beth is the timid sister with a voice begging to be heard. Guitar in hand, her courage inspires her siblings to seize the day and not take life for granted.

Amy may be the baby of the family, but she has the biggest personality. Though she loves to fight with her sisters, her tough exterior protects a vulnerable heart that worries about her family’s future.

 

Featured Images Via Amazon