Tag: lawsuit

Class Action Lawsuit For E-Book Prices Against Amazon & ‘Big Five’ Publishers

Amazon and the ‘Big Five’ publishers in the United States - HarperCollins, Penguin Random House, Simon & Schuster, Macmillan, and Machete - are suspected of covertly fixing the prices of E-books. The Seattle law firm Hagens Berman has filed the class-action lawsuit. They also filed the same lawsuit ten years ago, against the ‘Big Five’ and Apple, and won.

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Publishers Use Lawsuit to Pick a Fight with Audible!

In August, we reported that seven U.S. publishers had filed a lawsuits against Audible, claiming the popular audiobook platform’s new captions program violates copyright law.

Audible Captions scrolls a few words of AI-generated transcription to accompany an audiobook’s narration. In effect, Captions users would have access to the audiobook’s text in a roundabout way without having to purchase a copy of the e-book. However, the lawsuit filed in the U.S. District Court in New York “didn’t give permission to publish a text version of their titles to Audible, noting that the text rights require a separate agreement.”

 

Image via the wall street journal

 

The rapidly changing digital publishing landscape has often presented a challenge to book publishers, as it seems the definition of what a book even is must change in the world of e-books and audiobooks.

 

Maria Pallante, chief executive of the Association of American Publishers

Image Via Alchectron

 

Maria Pallante, chief executive of the Association of American Publishers, commented on the case:

What’s at stake is the viability of the publishing industry and the ability to rely on copyright law.

Audible has denied the new feature on their app violates any rights or agreements. In a a statement on August 23rd the company said that:

Captions was developed because we, like so many leading educators and parents, want to help kids who are not reading engage more through listening…This feature would allow such listeners to follow along with a few lines of machine-generated text as they listen to the audio performance. It is not and was never intended to be a book.

 

 

Since the captions would be machine-generated and not transcribed and edited, Audible admitted “up to 6%” of the text may have errors. In the lawsuit, publishers argued The Captions program would then harm their reputations as “as trusted and valued stewards of their authors’ works.”

The program was set to begin as early as September 10th, though this lawsuit will definitely complicate the release. Thankfully, Audible can still launch for works for which there is no permissions issue, such as public domain works and Audible or Amazon published titles.

 

Audible App

Image Via Author’s Guild

 

Audible is facing a fierce legal battle against a cohort of publishing giants. The plaintiffs in the case include Penguin Random House, Simon & Schuster, HarperCollins, Macmillan, Hachette Book Group, Chronicle Books, and Scholastic Corp. It’s difficult to tell what the outcome of the case will be this early on. But it’s definitely going to be an important event for the future of publishing.

 

 

 

Featured Image Thanks To Mary Scibilia 

‘It: Chapter 2’ Might Be In Some Big Trouble…

With the second trailer debuting last week to a great reception , it would seem that things couldn’t get any better for the sequel to the second adaptation of Stephen King’s IT, but you know what they say: what goes up must come down.

 

Stephen King's 'It'
Image Via Amazon
 

Alas, this is only the second time Stephen King’s gigantic book has been adapted. Previously, the book was adapted in a two-part miniseries that debuted on television screen in 1990.

 

1990's It
Image Via IMDB
 

This version, infamous for staring Tim Curry and a young Seth Green, became synonymous with the novel until the new film  came out in 2017. However, Frank Konigsbergand Larry Sanitsky were running Telepictures in the early 1980s when they had acquired the rights to the Stephen King novel. Konigsberg and Saitsky developed the miniseries from beginning to the end of pre-production, only leaving after Telepictures merged with Lorimar. Despite the merger, they retained company credit on the miniseries.

Konigsberg died in 2016 at the age of eighty-three, but Sanitsky, sixty-seven, is still alive. He might not be doing so well, however, since he is suing Warner Brothers.

As per Variety, Sanitsky is claiming the studio breached his contract by making the film adaptations, IT and IT: Chapter Two, without him.

The suite alleges two things. 1) Warner Brothers never consulted Sanitsky or Konigsberg about either film, and 2)  Warner Brothers stopped forking over profit statements for the miniseries back in 1995.

For the record, Warner Brothers issued its first participation statement since then in March, saying they owed the two $1 million. Santisky says that number is significantly understated, given that they are entitled to 10% of net profits of any remake, which the suit alleges would tally up to tens of millions of dollars.

 

2017's Pennywise

Image Via Pride

For the record, It was met with widespread critical and audience acclaim, boasting a a critical census of 85% with an average rating of 7.24 out of 10 on Rotten Tomatoes, and was a massive commercial success with a worldwide gross of $700 million.

While IT: Chapter 2 has yet to make it to theaters, it’s expected to make a ton of money once its release in September. Sanitsky intends to get paid or take Warner Bros. to court, through his and Konigsberg’s partnership’s corporate entities. They are represented by Dale Kinsella of Kinsella Weitzman Iser Kump and Aldisert.

In the meanwhile, Sanitsky now working on a film adaptation of Stephen King’s Tommyknockers, which he and Kongisberg also produced a TV adaptation of. As for Pennywise…

 

Pennywise dancing

Image Via Giphy

…he will dance his way into theaters this September 6th .

 

Watch the trailer below!

 

Featured Image Via The Wrap