Tag: Kennedy McMann

CW’s New Nancy Drew Series Sets a Darker Tone

CW’s new “Nancy Drew” series joins a growing trend of putting a dark spin on otherwise light-hearted source material. “Riverdale,” also produced by CW, is a gritty television adaptation of the Archie comics that started way back in the 1940’s. Netflix’s Chilling Adventures of Sabrina gained somewhat of a cult following when it came out because of its darker take on “Sabrina the Teenage Witch,” another character in the Archie universe. CW is continuing this trend with Nancy Drew, a darker take on everyone’s favorite detective from the 1930’s that stars Kennedy McMann as Nancy.

 

Image via the Cw

 

Noga Landau, the writer and producer behind the series, has spoken briefly about the tone of the new show:

Nancy’s not so prim and proper like she was in the original books. She has complicated relationships with her friends and her father, too.

 

 

These relationships are an intricate part of the first season, which actually debuts tonight. And while the new Nancy Drew series is based off the original detective novels, it uses no existing plots or mysteries. Even die hard fans will be surprised! Viewers will be introduced to the new Nancy Drew just as she meets her soon-to-be best friends George Fayne and Bess Marvin. Audiences will also see Nancy in the middle of some family strife. The first season follows Nancy just after she’s lost her mother to a terminal illness.

 

 

In an interview with Larry Teng, the show’s director, he said he took a lot of inspiration from other recent thrillers like The Conjuring and The Haunting of Hill House. He’s also said the show’s color palette pays homage to the original novels with its use of yellow and blue. He also spoke a bit about staying true to the character:

She should be able to figure things out on her own and create her own plan of escape. We want to present a world on our show that was consensual and being led by a strong female who is in charge of her own body and her own mind.

 

The new series promises to be a modernized update of one of literature most beloved characters. As Landau says:

 

We aged (the characters) up to the year 2019. It was about making them feel modern and diverse and a little more complicated than the characters in the canon.

 

 

 

Featured image via Entertainment Weekly