Tag: Jane Austen

First Images of Jane Austen’s ‘Sanditon’ Adaptation Released

Jane Austen has written many amazing novels in her lifetime, but there was one that she wasn’t able to complete: the novel Sanditon.

 

Written months before Austen’s death, the novel focuses on Charlotte Heywood after she moves to a coastal resort taking the name of the novel. The narrative follows Heywood as she adjusts to her new life while also dealing with her contentious relationship with the charming Sidney Parker.

 

It was announced last year that ITV and PBS were adapting the novel into a television series. Rose Williams (Reign) will play Heywood while Theo James (Divergent) will play Parker.

 

Today, we got some new images of James and Williams in the title roles, along with some of the other characters in the story:

 

Image Via The Independent

 

Image Via The Independent

 

The series will air on ITV later this year. It is unclear when the series will be broadcast in the states.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via History

Billy Nighy, Callum Turner to Star in Jane Austen’s ‘Emma’

Exciting news for Jane Austen fans! The newest film adaptation of Emma has found two more British mainstays for its cast. Bill Nighy, famous for such roles as Love Actually and Pirates of the Caribbean has been announced by this article to be joining Emma’s cast. Callum Turner, know for his role in Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindlewadis also joining the adaptation.

 

Callum Turner stands underneath a bright white sign for 'Grindlewad' at its premiere

Image Via Entertainment TOnight

Bill Nighy will be playing the father of Emma Woodhouse, Mr. Woodhouse, while Callum Turner will be playing Frank Churchill, a young man determined to keep his engagement a secret throughout the story. The story tells the tale of Emma Woodhouse, who lives in the fictional village of Highbury. The novel tells the story of youthful hubris, focusing on several families within the village through Emma’s eyes.

Playing the lead, Emma, will be Ana-Taylor Joy, whose credits include The Witch  and SplitThis adaptation will be directed by former music video director Autumn de Wilde, making her feature film debut. Also in the cast are Gemma Whelan, Mia Goth, and Johnny Flynn. The film will be splashing onto screens in 2020 and will such a star-studded cast, we can’t wait to see it!

 

Featured Image Via Observer 

Pride-And-Prejudice-Stage

Playwright of the Year Kate Hamill to Adapt ‘Pride and Prejudice!’

2017’s Playwright of the Year Kate Hamill’s adaptation of the two-centuries-old novel Pride and Prejudice is set to run on the Syracuse Stage from March 20 – April 7, 2019.

Drawing of Jane Austen

Image Via Biography

A little history:

A comedy of manners in Britain’s Regency era, the novel charts the emotional development of Elizabeth Bennet, known as Lizzy, whose family faces a financial crisis. Her mother urges her to marry any man who can provide for her and right on her porch are two men:  Mr. Bingley, who’s rich, and Mr. Darcy, who Elizabeth falls head over heels for, in spite of the fact that he isn’t considered socially ‘proper’. Meanwhile, Mr. Darcy is afraid to marry Elizabeth because she belongs to a different social class—despite the fact he’s madly in love with her.

In the end, both Elizabeth and Darcy learn to disregard the social pressure to marry wealthy people and instead marry for love. With over 20 million copies sold, this literary classic has literally been in the public consciousness for centuries.

Cover of Pride and Prejudice

Image Via Amazon

Since its publication, numerous adaptations have been, from the lost 1938 TV program staring Curigwen Lewis and Andrew Osborn, the 1940 feature film of the same name staring Greer Garson and Laurence Oliver, all the way to the 2005 movie staring Keira Knightly and the best version of Pride and Prejudice ever: 2016’s Pride and Prejudice and Zombies staring Lily James as well as various dramatizations, theater adaptations, illustrations, and books with similar concepts (including the Pride and Prejudice and Zombies novel).

All these words basically mean the same thing:

  1. There have been a lot of adaptations of Pride and Prejudice across various formats that vary on the faithfulness.

2) And Pride and Prejudice and Zombies is awesome.

Image result for pride and prejudice and zombies

Image Via ITunes – Apple

So there’s a lot riding against the new stage adaptation, but again, Kate Hamill has written it. Oh yeah, she won her 2017 award after receiving praise for her adaptation of the William Makepeace Thackeray’s 1847-1848 serial novel Vanity Fair for stage from both The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.

Headshot of Kate Hamill

Image Via Dramatists Play Service, Inc.

Even more, The Daily Orange writes that “Hamill views her process as a collaboration between the author and herself. She said she ensures her pieces are unique from the original, while still having the key moments those familiar with the novel will recognize.” Not surprising, seeing as this version is set to have musical numbers, including at least one scene with disco music.

Plus this new adaptation will not only be directed by Hamill’s fiancé, Jason O’Connell, but Kate Hamill will have a dual role: Lydia Bennet, the youngest of the Bennet sisters, and Lady Catherine de Bourgh, Mr. Darcy’s aunt.

Jason O'Connell and Kate Hamill on stage

Image Via The New York Times

Furthermore, this isn’t the first adaption of Pride and Prejudice Kate Hamill has created. In 2017, Kate Hamill and Jason O’Connell starred as the main character at the premiere of Hamill’s adaptation. Don’t think this will be just a remake of that version, though, because O’Connell told in an addressed to The Daily Orange that, …the actors I’ve cast now need the freedom to bring their own talents and energies to these characters, and not feel that they need to replicate my and Kate’s earlier performances.”

With that said, this new adaptation might be something to see.

Who wants to buy me a ticket?

 

Featured Image Via The Daily Orange

Bookstr's Three to Read

Bookstr’s Three to Read This Week 2/14/19

It’s Valentine’s Day—now more than ever, we need a book to fall madly in love with. This week, we’ve got three reads that are sure to show you a good time. (If you’re in the middle of a less satisfying novel, consider a dalliance with one of these. We won’t tell.) Our picks this week are fun yet honest, ideal qualities for any date! While some of these are romance-oriented, let’s not forget that self-love and personal development counts for more than we sometimes remember. So, honestly, love yourself and give one of these a read. Without further ado, here are Bookstr’s Three to Read: the three books we’ve picked for you to read this week. Time to find your perfect match!

 

OUR HOT PICK

 

Angie Thomas' hot new release 'On the Come Up'

 

Synopsis:

Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least make it out of her neighborhood one day. As the daughter of an underground rap legend who died before he hit big, Bri’s got big shoes to fill. But now that her mom has unexpectedly lost her job, food banks and shutoff notices are as much a part of Bri’s life as beats and rhymes. With bills piling up and homelessness staring her family down, Bri no longer just wants to make it—she has to make it.

On the Come Up is Angie Thomas’s homage to hip-hop, the art that sparked her passion for storytelling and continues to inspire her to this day. It is the story of fighting for your dreams, even as the odds are stacked against you; of the struggle to become who you are and not who everyone expects you to be; and of the desperate realities of poor and working-class black families.

Why?

Bookstr’s valentine is On the Come Up because we’ve fallen in love with #1 New York Times bestselling Angie Thomas, one of the most powerful voices in YA fiction today. Thomas expertly follows her breakout hit The Hate U Give with this novel, a raw, insightful, and often funny depiction of coexisting ambition and poverty. Thomas strikes a masterful balance when discussing issues of racism and structural inequality, using her light and playful voice to approach topics few other YA authors have addressed in such detail. Her careful examination of social issues and deeply nuanced characters will appeal to old fans and snag new ones. Warm, earnest, and honest, On the Come Up is your perfect book date this V-day, and it’s sure to be a match.

 

OUR Coffee Shop Read

 

L.C. Rosen's 'Jack of Hearts and Other Parts'

 

Synopsis:

Meet Jack Rothman. He’s seventeen and loves partying, makeup and boys – sometimes all at the same time. His sex life makes him the hot topic for the high school gossip machine. But who cares? Like Jack always says, ‘it could be worse’.

He doesn’t actually expect that to come true.

But after Jack starts writing an online sex advice column, the mysterious love letters he’s been getting take a turn for the creepy. Jack’s secret admirer knows everything: where he’s hanging out, who he’s sleeping with, who his mum is dating. They claim they love Jack, but not his unashamedly queer lifestyle. They need him to curb his sexuality, or they’ll force him.

As the pressure mounts, Jack must unmask his stalker before their obsession becomes genuinely dangerous…

 

Why?

Jack of Hearts and Other Parts is as unabashedly queer as its protagonist, including surprisingly frank and open discussions of sex. We’re talking better than sex-ed, complete with descriptions of different types of sex; advice on coming out; and even discussions of asexuality, an often misunderstood sexual orientation. L.C. Rosen is—excuse the pun—ballsy in his open portrayal of sex, drinking, smoking, and partying, boldly addressing facets of some teenagers’ lives that few authors cover in such detail. Readers will love this proud and confident gay protagonist, whose story is refreshingly fun and upbeat. Open, honest, and incredibly fun, this one’s hot enough to be your Valentine’s book date. Don’t drink too much coffee—you’ll want to bring this book to bed.

 

Our Dark Horse

 

Soniah Kamal's 'Unmarriageable'

 

Synopsis:

In this one-of-a-kind retelling of Pride and Prejudice set in modern-day Pakistan, Alys Binat has sworn never to marry—until an encounter with one Mr. Darsee at a wedding makes her reconsider.

A scandal and vicious rumor concerning the Binat family have destroyed their fortune and prospects for desirable marriages, but Alys, the second and most practical of the five Binat daughters, has found happiness teaching English literature to schoolgirls. Knowing that many of her students won’t make it to graduation before dropping out to marry and have children, Alys teaches them about Jane Austen and her other literary heroes and hopes to inspire the girls to dream of more.

When an invitation arrives to the biggest wedding their small town has seen in years, Mrs. Binat, certain that their luck is about to change, excitedly sets to work preparing her daughters to fish for rich, eligible bachelors. On the first night of the festivities, Alys’s lovely older sister, Jena, catches the eye of Fahad “Bungles” Bingla, the wildly successful—and single—entrepreneur. But Bungles’s friend Valentine Darsee is clearly unimpressed by the Binat family. Alys accidentally overhears his unflattering assessment of her and quickly dismisses him and his snobbish ways. As the days of lavish wedding parties unfold, the Binats wait breathlessly to see if Jena will land a proposal—and Alys begins to realize that Darsee’s brusque manner may be hiding a very different man from the one she saw at first glance.

Why?

Readers will fall madly in love with this modern update on a timeless classic. While Unmarriageable is delightful and romantic, it also doesn’t hesitate to address the double standards that women face in regards to romance, sex, and courtship. A rich depiction of Muslim culture, Soniah Kamal‘s novel glitters with beautiful language and imagery that would enchant any potential reader. It’s as fun as it is aware, expertly examining social stratification as it takes its readers on an entertaining, colorful romp. Kirkus Reviews called this release “a charming update to the original,” perfect for Austen fans and any reader looking for a perfect match.

 

So, is it a date?

 

In-text Images Via Goodreads