Tag: Jane Austen

Escape The Pumpkin Spice With These Hulu & Netflix Releases

With September comes cold sweater weather. If you find yourself missing Summer already, blast the heat and bingewatch some Netflix and Hulu in your bikini!

 

For September we are including Hulu releases as well as Netflix. We have to be inclusive after all!

 

We’ve put every new release into categories and included the Netflix release dates to boot! Click on the titles or where it says “book” or “novel” to either the watch film/show trailer or to purchase the original book.

 

 

Fantasy

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Image via Giphy

 

The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers – based on J. R. R. Tolkien’s second novel of his epic fantasy trilogy(September 1st, Netflix)

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King – based on J. R. R. Tolkien’s novel, and the final book of the LOTR trilogy (September 1st, Netflix)

 

 

Horror

 

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Image via Giphy

 

The Walking Dead (Season 9) – based on the comic series by Robert Kirkman (September 1st, Netflix)

The Dark Half – based on Stephen King’s novel of the same title (September 1st, Hulu)

 

 

Crime

 

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Image via Giphy

 

American Psycho – based on the novel by Bret Easton Ellis (September 1st, Netflix)

Basic Instinct  – based on the novel by Richard Osborne (September 1st, Hulu)

 

 

Drama

 

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Image via Giphy

 

My Sister’s Keeper – based on the novel by Jodi Picoult (September 1st, Netflix)

Disturbing Behavior – based on the novel by John Whitman (September 1st, Hulu)

Emma – based on Jane Austen’s novel Emma (September 1st, Hulu)

 

 

For Children

 

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Image via Giphy

 

Igor – inspired by the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelly (September 1st, Netflix)

Pinnocchio – based on The Adventures of Pinnocchio by Carlo Collodi(September 1st, Hulu)

Archibald’s Next Big Thing (Season 1) – based on the children’s book written by Tony Hale and Tony Biaggne (September 6th, Hulu)

Curious George: A Royal Monkey – based on the Curious George books by H. A. Rey (September 10th, Hulu)

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Gizmodo

Literary Canon Update

Have you ever been given a reading list that’s written, translated, and selected exclusively by and for men? Odds are you’ve rarely seen any that aren’t. If you want to appreciate the cannon while also living in a world where women exist, this is the list for you. These books and translations are some of the best and most lauded of all time, and yes, they’re by women.

It was, I must confess, a little hard to compile. The Odyssey was first translated by a woman only in 2017! But don’t despair. It’s all here for the taking.

 

The Iliad and the Odyssey

 

Homer’s epics have been translated MANY times, but these, by Caroline Alexander and Emily Wilson, respectively, set an incredible standard.

 

The Iliad

 

 

Close as can be to the ancient Greek, this translations has garnered heaping praise. “[T]he guard has changed, and a new gold standard has appeared”, said New Criterion at the volume’s publication. This edition even manages to retain the original line numbers from the Greek.

 

The Odyssey

 

 

This work, too, matches the original Greek as closely as possible. “A staggeringly superior translation―true, poetic, lively and readable, and always closely engaged with the original Greek”, said Harvard classics professor Richard F. Thomas. Iambic pentameter imitates the lyricism of the original Greek, and the volume also includes translation guides and maps.

 

 

Antigonik and An Oresteia

 

 

For both of these it is possible to turn to Anne Carson, a Canadian translator and classics professor. Carson’s translations are modern, elegant, and never condescending. In stead of translated, the works seem brought into the light, with all their strangeness and fierceness intact.

 

 

Jane Austen

 

How is it that Jane Austen, often the only woman on a reading list, is still under hyped? I had a guy in a bar tell me once that if people like Austen it’s because they haven’t read a lot of books. He really said that. Family conflict, human stories, and scathing humor makes Austen worth reading, with characters you really will love, and hate.

 

Pride & Prejudice

 

It’s a staple for a reason, and if you’re not sure you’ll relate to these people’s problems, you’re wrong. Fuckboys, impending poverty, poor decisions, and character growth you can get behind. Plus, it may be a period piece, but people still love their sisters. You’ll relate.

 

 

Jane Eyre

 

 

Another classic people want to avoid, but it has everything: deaths, fire, lies, weddings, blindness. I wouldn’t exactly call Jane a relateable character, but she’s understandable, I think, when you see everything she’s been through. And she’s incredibly decisive.

 

 

 

Images via Amazon 

3 Shockingly Savage Jane Austen Quotes

There are so many spectacular Jane Austen quotes it’s hard to choose just three, but they’re not all just deep or wise or about marriage and life (or at least, not only those things). Some of them are actually the sickest burns I’ve ever seen in my life.

 

Persuasion

 

Image via Freepik, quote via GoodReads

 

That is an incredibly metal way to talk about someone who died at sea. My god. Austen doesn’t get enough credit for totally demolishing people. These are not just cozy period pieces. Things get REAL. This is only like half the quote, too. She reads this guy straight through six feet and a coffin. He might not be good for much, but at least we got this devastating burn out of it.

 

 

Pride and Prejudice

 

Image via BuzzFeed, quote via GoodReads

 

What’s that Mr. Darcy? I don’t seem to understand you. Get rekt. Elizabeth is actually pretty polite. At least compared to Anne. I’m not sure there’s any outdoing her. Elizabeth is scathing though, and whatever she lacks in outright insults she certainly makes up for in getting her point across. There are many ways to offend.

 

 

Northanger Abbey

 

Image via Duke University Libraries, quote via GoodReads

 

Be smug, readers. I guess this isn’t THAT bold of a statement, since people who DON’T enjoy novels aren’t likely to be reading Austen, but it’s also really extreme. “Intolerably stupid?” I mean, it’s not like I’m saying she’s completely wrong. I’m just saying. Those are READERS, Jane. Something something character development. If you didn’t like Northanger Abbey I guess this is why.

 

 

Featured image via The Royal Mint 

Top Five Emma Memes

Sure, Emma’s not a perfect character, but she is trying to help, even if she… really shouldn’t. It’s not like anyone lets her get away with her nonsense, anyway. Insert growth meme. But between meddling, genuinely helping, and finally figuring out her own life, here are some really memeable moments we can’t let go by unnoticed.

 

When you love unsolicited advice

 

Image via Goodreads

 

I mean, she wasn’t, but relatable, amirite? We’ve all known someone who basically runs their relationship like madlibs. Poor Harriet, though. She thinks Emma is so cool and wise, just because she acts cool and wise. Maybe by the end, but certainly not here.

 

When your friend always knows what’s best

 

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Stay out of it, Emma. The guy you picked isn’t exactly a gentleman, at least not in action. I’m all for helping your friend find the best guy for her, but maybe the first criterion should be at least the slightest bit of interest. I’m just saying.

 

 

Feeling the funeral spirit?

 

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Okay, so maybe not the most appropriate tone to strike at a funeral, but it’s understandable. Sure, someone died, but what about true love? I ask you. Everything’s coming up Fairfax. And Churchill. And honestly even Woodhouse. Frank’s aunt really did the story a solid.

 

A good nemesis is hard to find

 

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Have you ever had a nemesis? Because let me tell you, it is great. Sure, she looks angry, and maybe she is, but you can definitely enjoy a good rivalry. The most important part of having a mortal enemy is to have fun and be yourself.

 

 

When he gives super helpful advice

 

Image via Emma

 

What a quality take, KNIGHTLEY. Just what everybody wants, your opinion on women. Okay, so he probably didn’t mean any harm. Still pretty insulting though. I guess we’ll forgive him, since he’s less of a jerk by the end. Insert growth meme again. This books sure has character development.

 

 

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