Tag: Ireland

‘American Crime Story’ Producers to Adapt ‘Say Nothing’ for FX

Brad Simpson and Nina Jacobson of the cable production company Color Force, creators of such shows as American Crime Story/Pose, have optioned the book Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland to develop as a limited series for FX. Simpson and Jacobson will serve as executive producers for the upcoming series, along with the book’s author Patrick Radden Keefe.

 

The cover to 'Say Nothing' by Patrick Radden Keefe
Image Via Goodreads

 

Say Nothing tells a true story about Northern Ireland during the Troubles, centering on the devastating killing of a thirty-eight year old mother Jean McConville. In 1972, McConville was dragged from her home by masked intruders. Rumored to be a British informant, she was never seen again…until 2003, when her remains were discovered on a beach. Keefe uses the murder of McConville to discuss Northern Ireland’s society at a time, painting a devastating picture of a society wracked by violence and guerrilla warfare.

The producers are excited about the project, saying the book works as both a crime thriller while also focussing on human drama. It remains relevant today, as fears grow of a resurgence of violence in Northern Ireland due to the impending Brexit.

All in all, this sounds like the perfect show to get excited for on FX. In the meantime, grab yourself a copy of Keefe’s book and read up before the show premieres!

 

Featured Image Via The Hollywood Reporter 

Ancient Book Proves Connection Between Medieval Irish Doctors and Islamic Culture through Missing Binder

The Independent reports that an ancient text has revealed a surprising connection between medieval Irish doctors and ancient Persia (now Iran) during an important age of Islamic learning. Professor Pádraig Ó Macháin of University College Cork’s Irish Department discovered that doctors in the 1400s were exploiting medical knowledge from Persia. The famous medical text Canon of Medicine by the Persian physician Ibn Sena (980-1037), also known as Avicenna, was used to train doctors in Ireland during the medieval times.

 

Image Via Independent.ie

 

The spine of the book was found to contain an Irish translation based on a Latin translation of Ibn Sena’s work.  Prof Ó Macháin said “the discovery underlined just how much medical scholarship in medieval Ireland was on a par with that on the Continent.” Ó Macháin discovered that an Irish scholar must have travelled overseas to train, and was impressed by Ibn Sena. They decided to work together and used a Latin translation as the basis for an Irish translation.

 

Because of the importance of the manuscript fragment to the history of Irish learning and medicine, they agreed that the binding be removed from the book by John Gillis of Trinity College Dublin (TCD).

 

Prof Ó Macháin is quoted as saying, “The use of parchment cut from old manuscripts as a binding for later books is not unusual in European tradition. This is the first time that a case has come to light of such a clear example of the practice in a Gaelic context.”

 

“The discovery and digitisation of the text was a scholarly adventure,” he goes on. “One of those occasions when many people, not least the owners of the book, were working together towards a common purpose for the cause of pure learning. It was a pleasure to have been able to make it happen and to have been part of it.”

 

 

IMAGE VIA INDEPENDENT.IE

 

 

If you want to learn more about this discovery then read more of the article from Independent!

 

Featured Image via independent.ie
Dolly Parton Imagination Library

Dolly Parton Launches Free Book Charity in Ireland

You may know Dolly Parton as a record-breaking country musician (and sequin enthusiast). At age seventy-three, she’s still gorgeous and iconic as ever, making news with her recent appearance in YA adaptation Dumplin’ and her possible BTS collaboration. What you may not know is that she’s been a philanthropist for decades now. Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library (DPIL) is a charity providing free books to children in order to encourage intellectual development and a lifelong love of reading.

 

Dolly Parton Imagination Library Logo

Image Via Oakes Public School District

DPIL has provided over two decades worth of books to deserving children regardless of family income. Founded in 1995, the program mails free, “high-quality” books to children from the moment they leave the womb to the moment they step foot in their first classroom. While the program was initially only available in Sevier County, TN—where our beloved Dolly Parton is from—the charity gained national recognition. By 2003, the program had given children around one million books. The program is now international, operating in Canada, the UK, and Australia. As of today, Dolly’s vivid imagination has brought the Imagination Library to Ireland.

 

Dolly Parton reads a picture book to a crowd of happy children

Image Via Book Riot

A letter from Dolly Parton herself describes the heartfelt reasons behind her charity’s founding:

Before he passed away, my Daddy told me the Imagination Library was probably the most important thing I had ever done. I can’t tell you how much that meant to me because I created the Imagination Library as a tribute to my Daddy. He was the smartest man I have ever known but I know in my heart his inability to read probably kept him from fulfilling all of his dreams.

Inspiring kids to love to read became my mission. In the beginning, my hope was simply to inspire the children in my home county but here we are today with a worldwide program that gives a book a month to well over 1 million children.

It’s been quite a journey but we have so much more left to do. I would love for your community to join our family so please take the time to explore our website. Let’s share this dream that all children should grow up in a home full of books.

The charity may have started off as a figment of Dolly Parton’s imagination, but this dream has seriously come true. Since its founding, DPIL has distributed over 100 million free books to children… and that number will only continue to grow as children in Dublin register to receive their free books.

 

Dolly Parton Imagination Library (DPIL) mailing totals as of January 2019

Image Via Imagination Library

 

As DPIL launched in Ireland, Parton urged parents to enroll their children: “I know there are children in Ireland with their own dreams… the seeds of these dreams can often be found in books, and the seeds planted in a community can grow across the world.” All children under the age of five in Dublin 24 now have access to the program—and its free books! The program has ambitious goals: 21,600 books for 3,200 children within the first year. After that, Irish program coordinators hope the program will spread throughout the country.

Interested parents can register their young readers at www.cdi.ie/imaginationlibrary!

 

Featured Image Via Imagination Library

Winds of Winter Knock Down Trees Made Famous by ‘Game of Thrones’

Not only is Game of Thrones ending, but one of the giant beeches, known as ‘The Dark Hedges’, made famous by the fantasy drama, has unfortunately met its end over the weekend due to 60mph winds.

 

Image Via Belfasttelegraph.co.uk

 

Image Via BBC.com

 

This wasn’t the first time the famed trees came up again winds like these,  as in June of l2018, Storm Hector wreaked havoc on the woods.

 

Image Via BBC.com (Photo: Bob Mccallion)

 

Image Via BBC.com (Photo: Bob Mccallion)

 

The tourist attraction along the Bregagh Road near Armoy, initially had 150 trees, but only ninety are left standing.

Woodland Trust’s Paddy Cheng told NBC News North Ireland that the trees are as old as 1775, in his words, “old aged pensioners.” He said, “They are coming to the end of their life, normally beech trees survive around 250 years, they are probably now 240 years old.”

Joan Baird who is a Causeway Coast and Glens councilor believes that tourists are also a reason why for these trees extinction and the “terrible loss” for the site, the Belfast Telegraph reported.

 

Image Via Wikipedia.org

 

The trees are one of the most Instagrammed locations. The tunnel of trees is reminiscent to Arya Stark escaping Kings Landing, her escape route of choice in doing so.

 

Featured Image Via BBC.com
seamus heaney

New Exhibition to Show Nobel Prize Winner Seamus Heaney’s Writing Process

Seamus Heaney, one of Ireland’s and, indeed, the world’s greatest poets, won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. He passed away in 2013. I remember I was at a music festival in County Laois when I heard, half drunk in a field with all my friends and everybody was so shocked as the news began to make its way around the campsite. If ever you’re experiencing any of those pervasive, pesky, middle-aged doubts about whether young people still appreciate art or poetry, know that hundreds of twenty-year-olds at Electric Picnic in 2013 stopped what they were doing and wept when they that heard Heaney died, that every drink poured down their throats that night was first raised to his memory.

 

Seamus Heaney’s work often explored the tensions and violence in Northern Ireland between Protestants and Catholics, Unionists and Nationalists, as well as delving deeper into Ireland’s past, for example examining the phenomenon of bog bodies in his poem ‘The Tollund Man.‘ 

 

On this World Poetry Day, the National Museum of Ireland has Tweeted a photograph of a page of Heaney’s poetry, edited and annotated by the man himself, as a taster for what is in store for those lucky enough to attend their upcoming exhibition. 

 

 

According to the National Library:

 

“Seamus Heaney: Listen Now Again”, a major international exhibition that will tell the story of the work of the Nobel Laureate and one of Ireland’s most loved writers. The exhibition will draw on our extensive archive of Heaney documents and will include diary entries, photos, note books and recordings. Opening in summer 2018 at the Bank of Ireland Cultural and Heritage Centre, College Green, Dublin 2, in partnership with the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht and Bank of Ireland.

 

If given the chance to visit Dublin while it’s on, any self respecting book worm must make it their business to visit this tribute to one of the greatest poets of all time. 

 

 

 

 

Featured Image Via The Times