Tag: internet

Check Out These Fourth of July Recommendations!

 

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just to make sure you’re out there living your absolute best life! This week, we’re taking a break from the usual routine to bring you some summer reading for the 4th of July! Here are some reading recommendations as you relax on a beach, prepare to lounge by the pool, or take in the fireworks!

 

Image via Amazon

 

5. Shapes of Native nonfiction edited by Elissa Washuta and Theresa Warburton

 

Shapes of Native Nonfiction by Elissa Warburton is a collection of essays that helps us remember America’s first people, the Indigenous Americans, even as we celebrate our own independence from British rule. This collection features a full range of dynamic Indigenous talent designed around the theme of lyric essays. Featuring imaginative and well regarded talent putting on a full range of work, this collection is one to read about America’s heritage and certainly a relaxing read beneath the warm skies.

 

Image via Amazon

 

4. Because Internet by Getchen McCulloch

 

Because Internet by Gretchen McCulloch is a good book to get yourself back into the internet swing of things in a relaxing fashion. This book defines the language and slang of the internet for not so savvy internet users, as the internet is making language change faster than perhaps our brains can keep up with. The author helps unpack the evolution of digital language, providing a survey of everything from the appeal of memes to the true meaning of ‘LOL.’

 

Image via Amazon

 

3. Revenge of the Punks by Vivien Goldman

 

Revenge of the Punks by Vivien Goldman is a rock and rolling book about reliving the turbulent days of youth. Goldman was Bob Marley’s first UK publicist but also wrote searing music reviews in the 70s and 80s. She now turns her pen to telling the stories of female music writers and women’s relationship to the music that defined generations. She tells stories of the genre’s rebel women such as Bikini Kill, Nehen Cherry, and activist punks. Goldman’s book explores their lives, capturing the spirit of rebellion to get you pumped for July 4th.

 

Image via Amazon

 

2. Trick Mirror by Jia Tolentino

 

Trick Mirror by Jia Tolentino is a collection of essays revolving around our own self-destruction, fueled by the rise of social media and our increased isolation. You might not think that’s an optimistic, breezy read, but the author tackles the essays with humor and grace, tackling challenging topics with easy to understand context. This may be a little more challenging, but if you’re looking for a way to truly stop your self-reflective sense of self-delusion and self-destruction, this is the read for you.

 

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1. A Death in the rainforest by Don Kulick

 

A Death In the Rainforest by Don Kulick discusses what it means to truly study another culture that is not your own. It tells of Don Kulick, who went to the tiny village of Gapun in New Guinea to document the death of the native language, Tayap. Over thirty years, he documented the slow death of Tayap and the look of vanishing death. The story tells not only of Don’s illuminating look into the native language, but also the white society’s reach into the farthest corner of the Earth, and Kulick’s realization that he had to stop his study of the culture altogether.

 

 

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nanowrimo

The Best Apps for Every Step of NaNoWriMo

So it’s the beginning of National Novel Writing Month, and you only have time to do things like go to school for eight hours, sleep for an inconvenient five or so, and occasionally eat. Writing does take time, but you have more time than you probably think (unless you thought you had twenty-four hours in a day, which is technically accurate but unlikely for a functioning person). While there are some circumstances where you can’t whip out your laptop, there are far fewer cases where it’s unusual to take out your phone. So instead of lamenting your wasted time, use the moments you do have to chip away at that 50k on iPhone or Android… with some (all free!) apps to help you with every step of the process.

 

1. The research process 

 

 

Charlie Kelly from 'It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia'

Image Via Imgur.com

 

Evernote, free for iPhone and Android, is perfect for keeping track of all your research and inspirational quotations. Its Web Clipper feature allows you to incorporate your source material directly into your notes, so you don’t crash your computer (again) with your 22 dubiously-useful open tabs.

 

2. The outline 

 

 

Millie Bobby Brown Gif

Gif Via Tumblr.com

 

Go Writer Lite for iPhone incorporates note-taking into the writing process with the draft board feature, a temporary storage space for text fragments (like that one sentence you just can’t figure out). As a bonus, the app will read your text aloud to you, so you can hear for yourself what sounds the way you imagined it.

 

Workflowy for Android is perfect for complicated outlines, allowing users to see any heading and its subheadings in isolation to prevent distraction (to the extent that it can). The app also includes searchable hashtags, so you can mark problem areas you want to remember for later—and then actually remember them.

 

3. The first draft

 

 

'Tom and Jerry' Gif

Gif Via Github.com

 

Writer for iPhone is more powerful than your typical word processor, saving all drafts of your product so that you never lose any material. In addition to your usual built-in spell check, this app also comes with a built in thesaurus to help you find the right (write?) word. On top of that, the app has simple yet varied table of contents formatting to help you and (and your eventual readers!) stay organized.

 

4. The editing process 

 

 

Frantic Typing Gif

Gif Via Gfycat.com

 

Unlike your typical sticky note phone app, Jotterpad for Android keeps track of your word count, paragraph count, character count, AND reading time. With a built in dictionary and thesaurus, this app is already better than many word processing computer programs. Jotterpad is especially good for your second and third drafts, as its snapshot feature allows you to revert to earlier versions of your story.

 

With any luck, these apps will help you put your (relatively few) moments of down time to work writing the novel of your dreams (or occasionally your nightmares).

 

Featured Image Via WeScreeplay

dead girl's detective agency

HarperCollins Launches First Snapchat Novel

HarperCollins has partnered with Snap to launch the first story of its kind— a Snapchat mobile adaptation of a teen mystery novel. Suzie Cox‘s The Dead Girls Detective Agency, a popular YA mystery from 2012, has taken its place at the frontier of digital storytelling. 

 

 

Promotional shot for 'The Dead Girls Detective Agency' based on novel by Suzie Cox

Image via fiercevideo.com

 

 

On October 10, 2018, Snap launched its new Snap Originals: five-minute episodes of original shows with new episodes premiering daily. At the moment, there are twelve shows available through the Discover feature. All episodes are vertically shot, meaning they’re perfectly adapted for mobile viewing. The content ranges in subject matter, with many documentary style shorts across every genre from horror to romantic comedy. One follows the exploits of Bhad Bhabie (A.K.A. the ‘cash me outside’ girl); another follows the rise of teen queens (that’s drag AND drama queens).

 

 

Snap Originals Logo

Image via mobilesyrup.com

 

This adaptation is just one of a few ways that technology continues to push storytelling further into multimedia territory. A much earlier example is the publication of Lauren Myracle‘s inventive The Internet Girls books (ttyl; ttfn; and l8r, g8r), a series Myracle crafted entirely from instant messages. Other YA novels have since followed suit, incorporating social media elements like chats, blog posts, and online profiles into the structure of the story. Books have taken inspiration from social media for well over a decade; now, social media is taking inspiration from books. The HarperCollins Snapchat partnership further demonstrates the way in which the symbiotic push and pull between books and technology ultimately shapes both mediums.

 

 

Featured Image Via epicreads.com

Stack of nice books high resolution quality nice pretty

Meet the Stars of Bookstagram, Who Bring the Glam to Reading Life

It’s no secret that bibliophiles are often creative, artistic, and innovative people: after all, they’ve learned the power of building new, beautiful worlds in every book they’ve read. That’s why Bookstagram, a community within Instagram designed entirely for bookworms like yourself, is the perfect platform to share bookish wisdom and whimsy in creative ways. 

 

At its most basic, #bookstagram is used as a hashtag for book-related images on Instagram, from your latest beach read to the facade of a bookstore you’re dying to visit. But if you’re dying to show the world exactly how much you love reading, you can create an entire “bookstagram” yourself. There are no strings attached here—all you have to do is start a new Instagram account, then start posting all the literary photos your little heart desires.

 

Meet some awesome Bookstagrammers!

 

1. @hotcocoareads

 

 

“A bookshelf is as particular to its owner as are his or her clothes; a personality is stamped on a library just as a shoe is shaped by the foot.” —Alan Bennett . . I finally finished my January bookshelf project! I moved out all my non-fiction and middle-grade books to other rooms in my house so that I could have this area dedicated to classics. There is one small section of Young Adult books in the corner, but it’s fine for now. I’ve also left lots of space on most shelves for growth, and we’ll see how things are looking again next January, when I usually want to reorganize my books again. When is the last time you reorganized your bookshelves? Do you do it very often? Do you enjoy it—because I really do! I love holding my books in my hands again, leafing through them, smelling their pages and dusting them off! ? ? ? . . #bookshelves #shelfiesunday #shelfie #bookshelfie #homelibrary #bookcollection #bookcollecting #collectingbooks #booksbooksandmorebooks #bookseverywhere #booksbooksbooks #readingspot #booknook #readingspace #writingspace #readersofig #ilovebooks #amreading #readmore #homeoffice #surroundedbybooks #bookdecor #janinbooks18 #bookproject

A post shared by Jeana ?☕️? (@hotcocoareads) on

 

Jeana has been posting her literary adventures since 2015. With beautifully framed photos of her current reads and stacks of classics, she uses props like flowers and cozy essentials to decorate her content.

 

2. @thxboywthebooks

 

 

Maxi is an Argentinian vlogger who maintains a consistent cool-toned aesthetic on his account. Alternating between stacks, single book highlights, and spreads, he offers seriously addictive visuals of his favorite reads.

 

3. @reverieandink

 

 

Brittney is a book blogger who launched her Bookstagram account back in 2016. Her photos are jam-packed with rustic themed shots of her favorite fantasy and YA reads, each ornamented with cozy additions like her super adorable cat, Wes.

 

And don’t forget to get creative with your own Bookstagram! There are tons of ways to make a splash with your Bookstagram account. You can opt for simply posting swoon-worthy shots of your bookshelves (A.K.A. literary eye-candy) or you can get involved with reading challenges. You can find these on some big-name Bookstagram profiles if you’re willing to sift through your favorite accounts, but @thereadingwomen and @strumpetstea both have active challenges going on right now if you wanna get a headstart!

 

Don’t be afraid to reach out to authors and other Bookstagrammers: comment on their posts, ask questions, invite conversation. It often helps to pick a theme for your content and stick to it. Decide if you’re going to maintain a specific aesthetic (colorful, rustic, black and white, etc) then challenge yourself to deck out your account that way.

 

Sure, Bookstagram is chock-full of mesmerizing bookish photos to make you run to the nearest bookstore, but that’s not the only magic it has. The most beautiful part about Bookstagram is the sense of unity it fosters. An entire community of bibliophiles desperate to share their favorite reads with the world, Bookstagram allows an avenue for connection and comfort with like-minded bookworms all around the world. Don’t know what to read next? Need a bibliobuddy to fangirl with? Just head to Instagram and start swooning over words with bloggers who just might become your new best friends.

 

Feature Image by Aliis Sinisalu Via Unsplash

GoT map

This Interactive ‘Game of Thrones’ Map Makes the Story So Much Clearer

The world of A Song of Ice and Fire is so mind-bendingly large, it’s hard to keep track of who was where when. Wait, where was Arya when Bran became the Three-Eyed Raven? Oh, hold up, was Jaime in King’s Landing when Davos was in Braavos? Also, just knowing where Braavos is in relation to King’s Landing is so hard when you’re staring at a bunch of words on a page. And, if you’re watching the show, then the spinny map intro thing is really not much help. It’s all twisty and confusing.

 

Luckily, a few diehard fans have created an interactive map to help everybody keep track of their favorite characters. If you’ve just begun the books or are only a few seasons into the show, you can adjust your favorite character’s path across the world based on what chapter (of which book!) you’re up to, or which episode you’re on. You won’t be spoiled!

 

Follow this link to explore the map here!

 

Part of the fun of reading a fantasy series like GRRM’s is designing the world in your own head. The show does a good job of replacing the reader’s aesthetic with professional design. Because of the show you can see the dragons fly like falcons and that the clothing of the Iron Isles is Viking-y. But the readers lose something. Their, you know, imagination.

 

GoT fan art

Image By pulyx Via Deviant Art

 

This tool is a great balance of providing a totally helpful visual aid to the reader while still allowing people to retain their own conception of GRRM’s world. Kudos to the creators! Now they just have to update it to have all of season seven…

 

Feature Image Via Polygon