Tag: inspiration

5 Books Inspired By Greek Mythology

Greek mythology has a very special place in western culture. We see it in architecture, in art, and in the stories that inspire us. Terminology like a person’s “Achille’s heel” is so commonly accepted in the English vernacular that we don’t often give it a second thought. This mythos is ever present, and it acts as a creative muse (pun intended) to writers everywhere, and when there are stories that showcase Greek mythology in new and fun ways, those stories should be shared and explored.

 

Here are five stories that resonate with Greek mythology:

 

 

1. Circe

 

image via amazon

 

Written by Madeline MillerCirce was selected in 2018 as a Goodreads Choice winner. This book follows the titular character Circe, daughter of the sun god Helios. Though she didn’t inherit the her parent’s powers, Circe learns that she, in her own right, can rival the gods. For this very reason, she is banished to a deserted island where she continues to practice her magic and learn more about herself. She is ultimately forced to make a decision: will she ally herself with mortals, the individuals that she often sought solace with, or will she reunite with the gods, the group from which she originated?

 

 

2. Great Goddesses: Life Lessons from myths and monsters

 

image via goodreads

 

Great Goddesses is a collection of poems written by Nikita Gill, who is known for her poetry collections Fierce Fairytales and Wild Embers. Applying a feminist’s lens to these old myths and legends, Gill presents a new rendition of Greek mythology. As stated by this collection’s Amazon page:

With lyrical prose and striking verse, beloved poet Nikita Gill…uses the history of Ancient Greece and beyond to explore and share the stories of the mothers, warriors, creators, survivors, and destroyers who shook the world. A few examples of poems from this collection are Chaos to Nyx, Athena’s Tale, and Athena to Medusa.

 

 

3. AntiGoddess

 

image via goodreads

 

Antigoddess is the first book in Kendare Blake‘s series: Goddess War. The story begins with the goddess Athena growing feathers under her skin and inside her lungs. Hermes has a fever that is consuming his flesh, and the other Greek deities are suffering in similar ways. In order to find out why they are slowly dying, these two Greek immortals seek out Cassandra, a woman who was once a prophetess. They learn that Hera has joined with the enemies of Olympus in a bid for revenge, and these enemies are also falling victim to the same corruption that the Greek deities are.

 

 

4. The Goddess of Buttercups and Daisies

 

image via goodreads

 

Written by Martin Millar, The Goddess of Buttercups and Daisies follows the playwright Aristophanes, who is having a really tough time of it. He’s trying to create a comedy that will convince Athens to not go to war with Sparta for another ten years, but one inconvenience after another continues to hinder his efforts. To make matters worse, Spartan and Athenian generals have released Laet, a spirit of foolishness and poor decisions on Athens with the intention of sparking war. Athena, in an effort to stop this chaotic force, sends the Amazonian warrior Bremusa and the nymph Metris into the fray. This book has been described as a “witty and comical romp for readers of all ages.”

 

 

5. Till We have faces

 

image via amazon

 

While I try to find books and stories that have been published more recently, I couldn’t pass up adding this text to the list. Author C.S. Lewis wrote Til We Have Faces with the intent to retell the famous “Cupid and Psyche” myth from the point of view of Psyche’s sister, Orual. Orual is described as being physically disfigured, bitter and obsessively in love with her sibling. When Cupid falls for Psyche and takes her away, her sister is forced to reevaluate her moral stance and decide where, exactly, she will go. It should be noted that this book is allegorical, and there are some distinct theological undertones attached to it.

 

Cover Image via Newsela

 

 


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5 Quotes To Help You Kick Your NaNoWriMo Slump

With the month winding down and NaNoWriMo writers working to reach their respective 50,000 word goals, it should come as no surprise that many of these NaNo participants are experiencing a writer’s slump. Some of these individuals might be dealing with deadlines that relate to school, or perhaps work is taking its toll as the holidays fast approach. Or maybe it’s just good old fashioned writer’s block — the scourge of all writers.

Regardless, this is the time of the month where NaNo writers are confronted by their exhaustion, and they have to make the choice to keep working towards their goals or to call it good for the year. To keep you going, here are five quotes from writers to encourage you to keep working on your NaNo project.

1. “If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” – Toni Morrison

Image via Film at Lincoln center

Toni Morrison, author of Beloved and The Bluest Eye, is a Nobel Prize recipient and the writer of more than ten books.

 

2. “The first draft is just you telling yourself the story.” – Sir Terry Pratchett

Image via Britannica.com

While alive, Terry Pratchett wrote over 40 books. His impressive bibliography includes titles like Good Omens (co-written with Neil Gaiman) and the Discworld series.

 

3. “Do not hoard what seems good for a later place in the book, or for another book; give it, give it all, give it now.” – Annie dillard

image via the Nation

Annie Dillard is a Pulitzer Prize winner and the writer of books like The Writing Life and Living By Fiction. She has dabbled in multiple literary styles– everything from poetry to prose, and from fiction to nonfiction.

 

4. “It’s such a confidence trick, writing a novel. The main person you have to trick into confidence is yourself.” – Zadie Smith

image via Brain Pickings

Zadie Smith has been listed on Granta’s 20 Best Young British Novelists on two separate occasions. She is a recipient of the Orange Prize for Fiction award and a member of the Royal Society of Literature. She wrote the novels White Teeth and On Beauty.

 

5. “Many stories matter. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity.” – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

image via Nbc News

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has been rewarded the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, the Hurston/Wright Legacy award, and the Orange Prize. She wrote the novels Americanah and Half of A Yellow Sun

Featured Image Via Pinterest

 

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7 of the Most Insightful ‘Life of Pi’ Quotes

Almost two decades ago today, Life of Pi was first published. In honor of the publication anniversary of this international bestseller, we’ve gathered together some of the most insightful quotes from Yann Martel’s smash hit. Come along with us as we relive Pi’s amazing journey!

 

Image via Amazon

 

1 – It is true that those we meet can change us, sometimes so profoundly that we are not the same afterwards, even unto our names.

2 – To choose doubt as a philosophy of life is akin to choosing immobility as a means of transportation.

3 – If we, citizens, do not support our artists, then we sacrifice our imagination on the altar of crude reality and we end up believing in nothing and having worthless dreams.

4 – You must take life the way it comes at you and make the best of it.

 

 

5 – If you stumble about believability, what are you living for? Love is hard to believe, ask any lover. Life is hard to believe, ask any scientist. God is hard to believe, ask any believer. What is your problem with hard to believe?

6 – Life will defend itself no matter how small it is.

7 – I suppose in the end, the whole of life becomes an act of letting go, but what always hurts the most is not taking a moment to say goodbye.

 

Did we miss any of your favorites? Let us know on Instagram and Facebook!

 

 

 

Featured image via Indiewire.com

Mark Walhberg Reunites with Kormakur for New Adaptation

Mark Walhberg and Baltasar Kormakur are reuniting to adapt the 2017 novel Arthur: The dog who crossed the jungle to find a home. 

 

Arthur: The dog who crossed the jungle to find a home

Image Via Amazon

 

Walhberg and Kormakur previously worked together on 2 Guns in 2013, but this film seems to be much different in tone and subject matter. Arthur chronicles the story of Mikael Lindnord, the captain of a Swedish adventure racing team. During a race through the Ecuadorian jungle, Mikael encountered a stray dog. After the team fed the dog a meatball, Arthur followed them through some of the toughest terrain on the planet. Mikael even ended up adopting Arthur after the race and brought him back to Sweden!

 

 

The film looks to be a heartwarming and emotional journey following the team’s struggle through the race. If you want to learn more about the story before the movie comes out, check out Mikael Lindford’s account of this inspirational story! Nonfiction fans are sure to love this one.

In a review published at the book’s release, Publishers Weekly wrote:

The story of the race will appeal to readers interested in endurance, while the story about the powerful connection that can develop between people and dogs will find a broader readership among dog lovers.

Are you excited for this new adaptation? Are you going to read the book first? Let us know on Facebook and Instagram!

 

 

Featured images via Shutterstock and iMDB

Seven Inspiring Home Libraries

Do your elaborate fantasies all center around the ornate home library you’ll someday build? Do you need some inspo? We’ve got your back, because we’ve been thinking about the same thing basically non-stop. It’s our only dream. Here are some good photos to get you hype.

1. Traditional

Traditional Reading Space

Image via Trendir

 

Do you have a spiral staircase? Someone must. Take advantage by making your home library look like an Austin novel with wood paneling, bare windows, and some varyingly aesthetic antique furniture. Perfect for taking a turn about the room—or the stacks.

 

 

2. Modern

Modern Reading Space
Image via The Spruce

 

Your style more modern? Those chairs look perfect for a long book melt, and the ladder is a great take on classic library design. Plus all your art books will pop against the white shelving. Just be sure not to spill your tea on anything.

 

 

3. Minimalist

Minimalist Reading Space
Image via Trendir

 

Keep it simple and straightforward with shelves and a seating arrangement. The antique, almost industrial windows don’t hurt, adding some sparse flare. This one is easy to achieve, since all you have to do is get rid of most of the furniture.

 

 

4. For Two-Story Spaces

Two Story Reading Space
Omage via Luxe Daily

 

One level simply not enough for your enormous collection? #goals. This walkway looks almost like a fire escape, and between that and the variously glossy greys on the first floor, this whole room evokes a kind of urban elegance, even with trees out the window.

 

 

5. For Small Spaces

Small Reading Space
Image via Bustle

 

Sometimes you’ve not got a huge room to dedicate to your library, but don’t let that slow you down. This reading nook is perfect for compact spaces, taking advantage of storage under the seating, and making the chaise a feature so it hardly matters the ceiling is so low.

 

 

6. For Houses

 Reading Space for Houses
Image via Design Sponge

 

Have a room for your library that you also need to function? This is the perfect blend of library and sitting room, emphasizing comfort, books, and the outdoors, it’s an effective mixed use space that also makes room for what’s important—books.

 

 

7. For Apartments

    Apartment Reading Space
Image via Pintrest

 

You don’t have to have grand windows and big empty spaces to make a modern home library. Even if your apartment is underground, a bunch of soft lights and plush details can make a cozy and stylish reading feature just as well as any other style.

 

 

Featured image via Trendir