Tag: huck finn

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Censorship: A Literary Tug of War

Censorship is everywhere and the general assumption is that it’s for the utmost moral reasoning. From a young age, people instantly recognize the bleeps on TV and know they weren’t supposed to hear the naughty words coming from the screen. It’s so ingrained in us so young that no one thinks to question it until adulthood. People go through an equal amount of experiences that hopefully allowed their skin to thicken to such things no rational person would pepper into a child’s ever-developing brain. However, there is indeed a large divide between an obscenity being blurted out and something much more obtrusive to the artist’s vision. While censorship can have some positive benefits to it, just like an egg in a frying pan the degree set can quickly burn away everything that was worthwhile.

When it comes to the world of literature, censorship can often steers away from the moral standpoint that is practically the sole principle that holds the whole idea together. I’m focusing on American Literature specifically because I feel this is where it’s the most contentious, which brings us to the grandaddy of timeless American classics: Mark Twain. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, a ton of different controversial themes are painted in a more starkly realistic light. The poor downtrodden of the south, race relations of the time, child abuse, con artistry, slave liberation, racial acceptance, and to put it bluntly, the perfuse usage of the N word are all covered through the novel. At the time the book was being heavily criticized and censored to the point where some regional copies of the book were redacted to change what offended many members of Twain’s audience. What were these people trying to keep away from the younger eyes of all the controversial subjects listed? The diction of some of the characters.

image via medium

The whole novel takes place in the south where ostensibly people speak ‘funny’ as Twain once put it in some of his travel writing. Twain didn’t write the dialogue of Huck Finn the way he did out of malice but for accuracy. He believed that if his characters spoke authentically in their respective regions that it would drive the points the novel was making about how people treat one another that much further. A very effective way to reflect in real life is to make a distinct but subtle connection between the two, acting as a conduit for the readers.

Twain brilliantly chose the manner in which different characters spoke to make the world of Huck Finn feel as real and at times subtly tragic to the world he and his contemporaries inhabited. His critics on the other hand believed that the use of diction would instil bad grammar and speech in the youth. All while completely missing the point of the novel which was a grand statement on race that wouldn’t be too different from an abolitionist pamphlet, at least in a didactic sense.

As a result, the book was censored in a way that would fly over most people’s heads. Obviously, through modern eyes, the N word would be the focal point of the issue but for the popularity of the timeless novel. What shuts down that argument is that despite the word, the usage it drives home the point of how people interact with each other. Huck admires Jim as a father figure even though he uses the word just as much as the other characters do but Huck’s intentions are ultimately altruistic as he fights to set him free in the end. All of this brave content would’ve been lost had the censorship gone further and in fact, the argument against the book’s usage of the racial slur still comes up today. Once more with good intentions, these critics miss the point as to why it’s used.

Mark Twain

image via Smithsonian Mag

With a plethora of increasingly graphic content in books as well as other mediums ever-growing, this serves as a good example of when the purest idea of censorship can get muddled under issues that are fueled by a lack of understanding. The art suffers tenfold when people try to censor anything under the guise that the minds of the youth shall not be tainted by the content adults take for granted. When it’s not backed for the right reasons, the public doctors the novelist’s thoughts to something that more resembles a vivisection as opposed to a gulp of medicine.

If authors aren’t allowed to reasonably explore differing and oftentimes difficult subject matters then that alone can sully the minds of the youth as those ideas explored encourage them to etch out the literary landscape further. Stagnation of forethought is infinitely worse than any diction a southerner can muster. While censorship can help, I reiterate, in some disturbing scenes that I won’t go into detail about in say, Stephen King’s It, the line between safe tinkering via the masses and displaying the woes of mankind is finely drawn. Censorship can indeed be beneficial but only under just cause as well as forbearance for the sake of the message the world needs to witness.

Feature image via Flickr

135 Years of ‘Huckleberry Finn’

“Right is right, and wrong is wrong, and a body ain’t got no business doing wrong when he ain’t ignorant and knows better.” – Goodreads 

Image Via Time

Mark Twain (real name Samuel Langhorne Clemens), was born on Nov. 30th in the small town of Florida, MO as the sixth child to John Marshall and Jane Lampton Clemens. When Samuel was twelve, his father died of pneumonia, and Samuel was forced to leave school to become a printer’s apprentice.

Samuel found his enjoyment of writing when he began working for Orion’s newspaper as a printer and editorial assistant. By the time he was seventeen, Samuel had left Orion’s newspaper to work for a printer in St. Louis. There he became a river pilot, which is where he adopted his pseudonym, Mark Twain, a term used by river pilots to mean “that is safe to navigate”(CMG World Wide).

 

 

Due to the lull in river trade during the Civil War in 1861, “Clemens began working as a newspaper reporter for several newspapers all over the United States”, according to CMG World Wide. Seven years later, Samuel married a woman named Olivia Langdon, and the two had four children, one of whom died in infancy, and two more in their twenties. Clara, their only surviving child, lived to be 88 years of age, with one daughter. Unfortunately, Clara’s daughter died young without having any children of her own, leaving no living descendants of Samuel Clemens.

Image Via Medium

Twain’s legacy survives, however, through his books, like The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Huck Finn, as it’s often called, has been taught in schools as one of the most famous works of literature. Below is a book summary:

“A nineteenth-century boy from a Mississippi River town recounts his adventures as he travels down the river with a runaway slave, encountering a family involved in a feud, two scoundrels pretending to be royalty, and Tom Sawyer’s aunt who mistakes him for Tom.” – Goodreads

 

 

Although it is the most famous, Huck Finn, is also very controversial. It turns up in the news more often than you think for being banned or restored in the school systems. On its anniversary, I encourage you to dive in and obtain a little bit of Mark Twain’s legacy.

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Featured Image Via National Post