Tag: horror

Watch Out! The Witches Are Back!

The Witches have made a comeback! It’s hard to believe, but it’s been 30 years since Roald Dahl’s masterpiece book was first adapted into a movie back in 1990, starring the fabulous Anjelica Huston!

 

gif via pop horror

You’d think we’d be safe this time around, but the clan of evil women have joined forces with the fabulous Anne Hathaway as the The Grand High Witch and Octavia Spencer as additional cast! Spooky, we know!

 

 

image via hollywood reporter

 

Director Nicolas Roeg did a spectacular job with the movie in 1990, because it still has a cult following to this day. But rumor has it, Roald Dahl did not approve of the film, as the ending was changed from the book, so lets see how things turn out this time around.

 

image via imdb

Even though the book came out in 1983, I remember reading it as a kid much later and being downright terrified. And the movie was perhaps one of the single most horrifying and equally thrilling children’s movies to have ever been released, in my opinion!

 

 

image via amazon

So, safe to say, we are quite excited and thrilled for the upcoming adaptation, and hope it does justice to the previous fantastic 1990 movie, as well as the timeless book. And maybe this time around, Roald Dahl would finally be content!

 

featured image via heart radio


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5 Ghost Stories to Read on Christmas Eve

Though we might not readily associate ghost stories with Christmas Eve and winter celebrations, it was actually a very common practice to tell scary tales during the 19th century and even earlier on than that. For a number of reasons, some of which can be cited back to Puritan ancestry, this story telling tradition fell out of practice in America.

I, however, am a horror story buff, and I will look for any excuse to spin a scary yarn with friends and family.

 

Here are five ghost stories to read on Christmas Eve.

 

 

1. A Christmas Carol

 

image via Amazon

 

This is most definitely the longest ghost story on the list, but it definitely fits with the season. Charles Dicken’s A Christmas Carol is a culturally significant tale that has countless adaptations credited to it. This narrative follows Ebenezer Scrooge, an embittered old man who doesn’t just hate Christmas, but he just hates people in general. Yet out of everyone, he despises individuals who would dare to ask him for his time or, even worse, his money. He intends to spend Christmas Eve alone, as he does every year, but his plans are uprooted when the ghost of his former business partner comes to him and says that three more phantoms will be visiting him that night. Scrooge is forced to confront the ghosts of his past, and he is urged to change his ways. If he doesn’t, his actions won’t only result in ruining his life, it will also harm those directly impacted by his decisions.

 

 

2. The Turn of The screw

 

image via goodreads

 

Henry James‘s novella, The Turn of The Screw is an eerie tale that spans roughly seventy pages. The story begins with the narrator and his friends telling each other ghost stories one Christmas Eve, and the narrator claims that he is in possession of a one hundred percent real account of a haunting. What follows is the story of a governess who is hired to teach and care for two children. While her employment begins without incident, the governess soon begins to see strange, ghostly figures from a distance. She soon learns that these phantoms have sinister plans for the children, and she must do everything in her power to protect her two pupils.

 

3. The Kit Bag

 

image via literawiki

 

Written by Algernon Blackwood, The Kit Bag is a short story that follows Johnson, a lawyer’s secretary. Johnson is set to go on Christmas vacation after his boss wrapped up a case where he defended a man convicted of murder. He borrows a kit bag from his boss, but there is something very, very wrong with it. Johnson begins seeing images and hearing voices near the bag. This story is suspenseful and frightening, and it is definitely an excellent ghost story to read this winter.

 

 

4. The Canterville ghost

 

image via Alma books

 

This one is most definitely a breath of fresh air after the last two stories on this list. Oscar Wilde‘s The Canterville Ghost is a comedic story that plays with the tropes found in English ghost stories. This narrative follows an American family who moves to England and takes up residence in a haunted house. Try as the ghost may to frighten these new tenets, his efforts are in vain—the family just isn’t scared of rattling chains and random bloodstains. Unlike the previous two entries on this list, this story also has a happy ending. *Spoiler Alert*: This story begins as a playful ribbing of English ghost stories and ends with redemption for the ghost.

 

 

5. Oh, whistle, and i’ll come to you, my lad

 

image via pinterest

 

So many of the images for M.R. James‘s short story Oh, Whistle and I’ll Come to You, My Lad, are terrifying. This one is pretty tame by comparison to a few that I found. Professor Parkins, the story’s main character, goes on a golfing vacation. While on vacation, he comes across some old ruins and, and in these ruins, he finds a small whistle. Almost immediately after finding this item, Parkins begins to see a figure, have visions, and experience an oppressive energy. This all culminates in the final chilling encounter, where the figure that Parkins has been seeing in the distance appears in his bedroom.

 

Featured Image Via Den of Geek

 

 


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Scholastic’s ‘Point Horror’ Series Coming To HBO Max

Fans of children’s horror stories will want to check out this new show coming to HBO Max.

 

Variety reported that the upcoming streaming service is developing an anthology series based on Point Horror, a series of young adult horror novels that started in the 1980’s and helped launch the careers of several horror writers like R.L. Stine, Caroline B. Cooney, and Diane Hoh.

 

Image result for point horror books

Image Via A.V. Club

 

The HBO series will be titled Point Horror, and will be an anthology series described as a show that “exposes the horrors of being a teenager”. The show will take stories from many different novels in the series, but it’s rumored that most of the episodes will be based on Stine’s work.

 

 

John M. Chu (Crazy Rich Asians) is in talks to direct the pilot episode. Stine is set to executive produce.

 

Have you read any of the Point Horror books?

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Adverts.ie

4 Best Facts About Bram Stoker

In honor of Bram Stoker’s  birthday here are the four most interesting facts about him.

 

Image via Encyclopedia Britannica 

 

4. Romance Extrodinaire

Stoker is an horror icon but for those read his other works wouldn’t know that he was a major romantic. His romance novel’s include, The Shoulder Shasta, The Watter’s Mou and Miss Betty.

 

3. Index Card King

He’s most recent book, well  by today’s standards was completely written on index cards. The book Seven Golden Buttons was published in 2015.

 

 

 

2. Bram Stoker v. Oscar Wilde

These two juggernauts knew each other and went to the same college in Dublin, Ireland. Florence Balcome, Wilde’s friend/ childhood sweetheart married Stoker and subsequently Wilde left for England. That must have been major tea back in the day.

 

1. The Bodyguard’s Ashes

Stoker died in 1912 and was cremated. His ashes are in the Golders Green Crematorium were you can visit but you have to be escorted. Either they are super tight around security there or is there’s another mysterious reason why they don’t want you to go alone?

 

 

 

Featured image via Pinterest 

5 Worst Horror Book Covers

Halloween is such a great season for scares, but what’s really scary is that a whole team approved these book covers for publication. I don’t know if these books are good, but I do know if I pulled any of them off a shelf they’d go right back there. Caution—they get increasingly stupid as you go down the list.

 

I’m So Scared… I guess…

 

Image via Too Much Horror Fiction

 

Is that a German shepherd? Even if it’s supposed to be a wolf, I’ve got some questions. Firstly, is this an entire book about a dog being evil or something? Putting aside the fact that ALL DOGS ARE GOOD, what can one dog actually effectively terrorize? A small colony of rabbits? Not to be dark, but hit that mangy upstart with your car and book over. I know I’m ignoring the elephant in the room, and sure, the doll’s at least broken, but I’m more alarmed by the fact that someone had a ceramic doll with a cheap weave. And are we sure the dog isn’t doing us a solid? That thing looks possessed.

 

 

Who is She?

 

Image via Spine Cracker

 

Not sure where to start. What’s that over the baby’s crib anyway? It’s not a mobile. Is it just a string of beads the size of oranges? Does being dead allow you to replace a bead with your head? It’s a specific power, but I guess I wouldn’t say no if someone offered it. Again, though, I’m ignoring the most mind blowing part. The tagline. I’m actually quaking, though I don’t think the fear of inconsistencies is the kind of terror they were going for. Listen. Listen to me. Look at that hair. Decadent? Decadent?!?! She doesn’t even have conditioner and they’re describing her as ‘so decadent?’ Seductive! I feel like there’s a lot to unpack, but I’m at a loss for words. Why is she balding?

 

 

Illustration is My Passion

 

Image via Horror Novel Review

 

They really did Stephen King like that. Stephen King! Say it with me. Respect. Genre. Fiction. What’s even going on here? The floating face is bad. I feel like someone needs to say that. His clothes are shredded, although maybe his jeans started distressed anyway. He’s not scratched up though! Whatever mauled him was like… panther attack, but make it fashion. I mean, it tells you nothing about the book, or at least, it doesn’t say anything to me, not having read it. But it goes further than that, and actively confuses me. What’s the threat? Witchcraft? Werewolves? He’s screaming but he hasn’t got so much as a scratch.

 

 

Wait a Second

 

Image via Good Show Sir

 

American Gothic, but like, a skeleton and also worse. But wait. What’s that there? Does the skeleton man… have a lobster claw? I’ve got to be honest, I’ve got no idea on this one. It’s like the Flying Dutchman, but in Michigan? I don’t know anything about lakes, but the internet says that they don’t have lobsters, so what, is this an oceanic curse that was like, you know what? I need to see the tulip festival. I now know about twice as much about Michigan as I used to. I still have no idea what’s going on. The barn has ghost crayfish? Something about that skull looks wrong, if I’m real.

 

 

Best Idea Ever

 

Image via Twitter

 

To be a fly on the wall in this pitch meeting. “Alright, hear me out: quicksand, but it’s sexy.” I mean the slime, the nudity, I’m not sure if they’re going to hang that guy or if he’s into it, and are those swamp monsters in the background? Skeletons? I just realized the naked woman has a sword. Is she beheading zombies in that getup? She’s like, sure this dress is see through, but if I’m going to effectively machete supernatural horrors, I need to be wearing LESS clothing. I feel like ‘sucking’ is also a little silly of a word if you want us to take this threat seriously. And what does it do? Follow you around trying to absorb you?

 

 

Featured Image via Wallpaper Access