Tag: horror

Stephen King Says: Stop Comparing Coronavirus To ‘The Stand’

The Stand is a post-apocalyptic novel by Stephen King. In this novel, a virus wipes out almost all of humanity, which is (thankfully) far from what we are dealing with at the moment.

King took to Twitter last Sunday to affirm that the coronavirus pandemic is NOT like The Stand. He states, “No, the coronavirus is NOT like THE STAND. It’s not anywhere near as serious. It’s eminently survivable. Keep calm and take all reasonable precautions.” From that tweet, you can tell that King has had ENOUGH.

In The Stand, the fictional virus is a strain of the flu that is weaponized for warfare. While coronavirus has killed over 8,000 people globally and has spread across 100+ countries, it still does not amount to this rapid and deadly fictional virus.

 

On a serious note, coronavirus is similar to the flu. If you are experiencing any symptoms, it is best to get a medical diagnosis before assuming the worst. Specialists believe that mortality rates will decrease over time as more cases are diagnosed. For loved ones with pre-existing medical conditions and those who are at higher risk, such as smokers and the elderly, it is best to take precaution. Practice social distancing, avoid touching your face, and most importantly, WASH YOUR HANDS!

Stay safe everyone!

Featured Image Via Pinterest

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Celebrating 18 Years of Coraline

“I don’t want whatever I want. Nobody does. Not really. What kind of fun would it be if I just got everything I ever wanted just like that, and it didn’t mean anything? What then?” – Goodreads
Image Via Amazon

One of my childhood favorites, Coraline, is celebrating its 18th birthday. As a paranormal fiction, Coraline opened our eyes to escaping our dingy flats and entering a perfect world that was way more exciting than our own.

Moving into their new home, Coraline went exploring, finding that their new flat had “twenty-one windows and fourteen doors.” Thirteen of the doors can be opened, without the use of a key. But the fourteenth door is locked. One day Coraline unlocks the door and finds a passageway to a similar flat to her own. Everything seems marvelous until the other mother and father want to change Coraline and never let her go back home. Lost souls of other children have been trapped in the mirrors for many years. Their only hope is that Coraline can fight against her other family and save the children, her ordinary life and herself.

 

 

Although Neil Gaiman is well known for his adult literature, Coraline was the first children’s book that sparked the interests of children who enjoyed the mysterious and creepy stories. Critics enjoyed the book as much as children did, so much so, that Coraline was awarded the 2003 Hugo Award for Best Novella, 2003 Nebula Award for Best Novella, and the 2002 Bram Stoker Award for Best Work for Young Readers.

 

Image Via Syfy Wire

 

This wonderful childhood thriller was later adapted into a movie. The scenes were able to inhabit the storyline of the book through its contrast of colors and staying true to the emotions that outlay Coraline’s reality.

If you loved Coraline just as much as I did, check out Gaiman’s website for more of his wonderful tales.

 

Featured Image Via Den of Geek

 


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Five Sanguinary Dracula Memes

Dracula memes never die.

 

I mean… Yeah

I love vampire movies or whatever when this happens. They’re like… you don’t understand… a stake through the heart could KILL ME. I always want the humans in question to be like, yeah princess, me too. It’s like that post about how a duck could kill you. A stake through the heart will probably take care of most people. You’re not special.

 

Read Me

I’ve gotta love this take of his. He’s like, you absolutely read me for filth. You’re savage, and you’re right. Marry me. I mean, we stan that vibe. She’s mean and I love her? He drank his respecting women juice. I mean, I guess. At the very least he likes mean women. We as a society have slept on mean women for too long. Chef’s kiss.

 

Head Cannon

I like to imagine this is what happened instead of the coffin on the ship. Just exclusively nocturnal unicycling across europe. It’s not like he needs to breathe. English channel whom? He doesn’t need a boat. Plus, this approach is way more menacing. Also, accurate. Here he comes. Dat boi. What’s up? Nothing good, I can tell you that.

 

But Like… At Night

Honestly the last line is what got me. Like, no, you may not, but I love how natural they make it seem in context and then you’re like… ayeee…. you’re asking because you HAVE to. I mean, no, I don’t want to talk about dracula, but I’m never awake during the day anyway, and I could definitely put relative invulnerability to use. I’d at least give them my email address.

 

Bad Content

Honestly I kind of just included this one because I (love) hate it. Who made this, and so recently that it could be searchable? We’ll never ever escape from Shrek. This is how we live now. It’s all smash mouth, and swamps. I also just love the idea of how bombastic this is. It’s like the opposite energy of the original. Very weird.


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Images via Tumblr

Sweeney Todd: The Stud of Fleet Street

I’ve been listening to the Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street on repeat for a while now, and I thought this would be a perfect story to talk about during the month of love. Because seriously, what’s romance in literature with out some tragedy and murder, right? It was originally a story called The String of Pearls and there have many adaptions but none more famous than the 70’s musical with music done by the legend Stephen Sondheim.

My first introduction to the story was the 2007 film adaptation directed by Tim Burton which starred Johnny Depp, Helen Bonham Carter, and Alan Rickman. I worshipped Tim Burton so I’ve seen everything he’s ever done and I’ve loved movie musicals so I was ready. I absolutely loved the movie and had no idea how much rich history the story had. Todd is basically an urban legend.

 

Image via Wikipedia

This is the best story to revisit this month, because Sweeney Todd is riddled with romance! Todd’s love for his wife, Lucy and his daughter Johanna, Anthony’s love for Johanna, Mrs. Lovett’s love for Todd, Toby’s love for Mrs. Lovett — but most importantly Todd’s love for his passion.

Before Sweeney Todd was born he was Benjamin Barker, a very gifted barber and had a set of beautiful silver straight razors. When he is wrongfully imprisoned and sent away for fifteen years, he vowed to get his revenge on Judge Turpin who assaulted his wife and took his daughter and raised her.

 

 

Todd loved his razors so much that he called them his friends and had a whole song dedicated to them! When one of his razors was in his hand, he would feel complete. Of course we are not excusing his behavior through out the narrative, because killing men and baking them into pie isn’t the greatest way to show one’s affections, but Mrs. Lovett doesn’t seem to complain.

 

Image via The Void

I always imagined what the story would have been like if Judge Turpin wasn’t horrible and if Todd wasn’t sent away and got to raise his daughter with his wife. He probably would have continued his work as a barber and might have even won an award if they gave awards for that sort of thing. Lucy and Johanna would probably garden and read, I suppose, as there wasn’t that much for women to do in those days, but they’d all have a sweet little life. And Johanna would probably meet Anthony in town and they’d eventually end up together.

Todd would be a great companion; not Todd as Todd but as Barker. He’d be dedicated, loyal and sweet, but unfortunately, if you are down with a mass murder, that is your prerogative. But let’s face it, there would be no story if Judge Turpin hadn’t been horrible, and Todd would have never gotten that cute white streak in his hair, and that would have been a shame.

In all seriousness, everyone has got to see or watch this story in whatever medium they can get their hands on, because it’s such a sad story but surprisingly enough, also filled with immense hope. Whether you are single or in a relationship, there is enjoyment to be had with the demon barber of fleet street.

 

Featured Image via Screen Rant

 


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Celebrating Forty-Three Years of ‘The Shining’

The midlife crisis is real. If you see The Shining buying a motorcycle, dyeing its hair or visiting a hotel in Colorado and turning on its family, go easy, it turns 43 today. Stephen King’s infamous novel, that spawned a modern cinematic classic, was published 43 years ago on January 28th 1977. King’s psychological horror had sold over a million copies as of 2012 with doubtless many more sold since. 

 

Image via ifc center

The Shining is one of King’s best-known (and loved) novels, penned after King and his wife spent some time in Boulder in a supposedly haunted hotel room. They stayed in room 217, which avid readers may recognize from the novel. The story follows Jack, Wendy and their son, Danny. Jack and his family take up residence in The Outlook Hotel during its off-season, so that he can focus on writing a novel. Danny has a sort of sixth sense that allows the hotel and its ghosts to communicate with and through him. They soon find that The Outlook Hotel has no intention of letting them leave.

 

 

Like many of King’s novels, some of the scariest moments are inherently human. The ghosts of The Outlook Hotel are not as much of a threat as the skeletons in our own closets and King explores this idea throughout. King has said that he used Jack and Danny’s relationship as a way to explore his own feelings of anger towards his children. In The Companion to Stephen King, he admits:

Sometimes you confess. You always hide what you’re confessing to. That’s one of the reasons why you make up the story. When I wrote The Shining, for instance, the protagonist of The Shining is a man who has broken his son’s arm, who has a history of child beating, who is beaten himself. And as a young father with two children, I was horrified by my occasional feelings of real antagonism toward my children. Won’t you ever stop? Won’t you ever go to bed? And time has given me the idea that probably there are a lot of young fathers and young mothers both who feel very angry, who have angry feelings toward their children.

 

image via amazon

The book was adapted to the now classic 1980 film of the same name. Directed by Stanley Kubrick, it has been immortalized as one of the best horror films ever made. Despite this success, Stephen King has not always been a fan of the adaptation and was against a prequel story. That said, he then wrote Doctor Sleep, the film version of which was released just last year.

It may not just be our nightmares that The Shining is haunting as it could be taking to the stage very soon. With Simon Stephens at the helm, Jack is getting a new lease of (after)life. A stage adaption would be very fitting since all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.

 

 

To celebrate the forty-third year of The Shining, consider staying at The Stanley Hotel, the inspiration for the Outlook. The film version changed the haunted room to 237 at the hotel’s request as they worried that featuring room 217 would dissuade guests from staying there. No matter which one you stay in, you’re sure to get all of the spooky vibes that King immortalized in the 447 pages of his novel.

featured image via metro


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