Tag: hollywood

Top Six Books Dealing With the Manson Murders

 

In 1969, four Manson Family members invaded the rented home of Sharon Tate and Roman Polanski in Los Angeles. Sharon Tate, who was pregnant, was murdered along with three friends and an 18 year old visitor.

The murders have gone down in history as one of the most infamous murders in America and the story isn’t fading away anytime soon, especially with Quentin Tarantino’s most recent film, Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, dealing directly with the subject.

These ‘Manson Family’ murders have been dealt with in various ways through television, movies, and of course, books. Thus, we have created a list of six books for those interested in learning more about the man and the myth.

 

 

Member of the Family

Image via Amazon

6. ‘Member of the Family’ by Dianne Lake

Member of the Family by Dianne Lake is a memoir by one of Charles Manson’s ‘girls’, telling her story of life under him. At age 14, Dianne became part of the Manson cult and its youngest member. For two years, she endured manipulation, psychological control, and physical abuse under Manson’s dark sway.

From her perspective, Dianne describes the cult’s descent into madness before their forgone conclusion. With the help of authority figures, therapists, and the police, Dianne was rehabilitated and grew to live a normal life. Now with have her book which tells her side of the story, giving key insights into Manson’s madness and showcasing one of the darkest chapters of American history.

 

 

The Life and Times of Charles Manson

image via Amazon

5. ‘Manson: The life and Times of Charles manson’ by Jeff Guinn

Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson by Jeff Guinn is a definitive account of Charles Manson himself. The author puts Manson in the context of the sixties, showing how Manson adapted to the turbulent era, an era dominated by race riots, cultural revolutions, and the Vietnam War. The author traces Manson’s origins back to his childhood, utilizing interviews with Manson’s sister, cousin, friends, classmates, and his old cellmates to show how his personality developed overtime.

All this combines to create a portrait of the man known as one of America’s biggest monsters.

 

 

The Girls

Image via amazon

4. ‘The Girls’ by Emma Cline

The Girls by Emma Cline is a work of fiction but invaluable part of the Charles Manson myth nonetheless. The story tells of a familiar idea: where in Northern California, a girl called Evie Boyd is drawn into a group that showcases idea of freedom, disrespect for authority, and reckless abandonment of society. She becomes a thrall to a soon-to-be infamous cult, led by an enigmatic cult leader. Each day, Evie spirals further into darkness and further towards a path that leads to violence.

This is a great coming-of-age tale that explores the conditions that lead to the Manson Family to thrive and how that intertwines with the ideology of a teenage girl.

 

 

The Family

Image via Amazon

3. ‘The Family’ by Ed Sanders

The Family by Ed Sanders was originally published in 1971 and has become a classic of the true crime genre. Meticulously researched, Sanders interviews dozens of members of the cult, including Manson himself, providing a detailed look into their origins, ideology, and motives. While some information in this book is rife with potential misinformation, given that Sanders promotes ideas of urban myths and some ugly victim blaming, the bulk of the information is not only credible but also incredible.

 

 

Chaos, Charles Manson, the CIA , and the Secret History of the Sixties

Image via Amazon 

2. ‘Charles Manson, the Cia, and the Secret History of the sixties’ by Tom o’neil

This book by Tom O’Nei is less a straight account of the Manson murders than a fascinating, dizzying, at times frustrating array of all of the alternative theories surrounding the case, from the suggestion that the murders may have been the result of a drug deal gone sour to the theory that Manson was a participant in CIA-sponsored LSD mind control experiments. While such theories are by no means proven, and vary wildly in terms of their believability, O’Neill does an excellent job at poking holes in the Helter Skelter narrative (not to mention the reliability of Bugliosi, who died in 2015) and forcing readers to reassess what had already been viewed as the definitive take on the case.

 

 

Helter Skelter

image via AMazon

1. ‘Helter Skelter’ by Vincent Bugliosi 

Helter Skelter by Vincent Bugliosi was published in 1974 and is considered the definitive account of the Manson Murders. The chief prosecutor of the case, Bugliosi takes the readers through the twisted journey of his detective work surrounding the trial of Manson and his cult.

Although far from an unbiased source, Helter Skelter remains to this day a fundamental resource for anyone interested in the case.

 

 

Featured Image Via Amazon 

The 5 Step Survival Guide to Hollywood Adaptations

There is nothing more exciting and frightening than hearing your favorite book is going to be adapted by Hollywood.

We’ve all been there before. A book that we read and loved is receiving a well-deserved movie adaptation. However, it begs the question: will the movie be everything we dreamed, or will it have us rioting in the streets? We all know there are some pretty horrific adaptations out there, but there’s no reason for us to lose our heads.

Here are some tips tips to help you survive the ordeal of your favorite book heading for the big screen.

 

 

 

1. Be Open To Changes

 

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Image via Giphy

 

Changes are inevitable. To defend Hollywood movie makers, not everything can fit in a film. If screenwriters tried to fit every detail from the book, the movie would be hours long, thus, cuts must be made, often necessitating minor changes elsewhere in the script for it all to make sense. We must accept that movies are a different artform, and therefore will not be exactly the same as the book.

 

2. Movies rely on the visuals 

 

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 Image via Giphy

Books are all about exposition, inner thoughts, and details, details, and more details. In film, simplicity and visual storytelling are key. There is also more focus on the outward expressions and actions of the characters involved, and most films don’t share the minute details in order to keep scenes engaging and entertaining for the audience.

Since books are meant to be read over time, having an abundance of detail fits. Films on the other hand ought to get to the point much quicker, so before you accuse an adapted film of “dumbing things down”, keep in mind, this is a different way to tell a story and experience one.

 

 

3. Talk About It With Those Who Have Not Read The Book

 

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More than likely, this will be the conversation you have with your fellow book nerds. | Image via Tea Time

 

As exciting as it is to read the book before the film, it can come at a cost. When you are watching a movie based on a book you love, it can be tough to look at it with fresh eyes. The temptation to hold on to what you believe is the best version can be unshakeable. This will stand in the way of enjoying what may be a fantastic and fun movie experience. Those who don’t read the book beforehand are the ones who will be able to purely judge the movie as it is – a tale with characters and ideas they have never seen before. In the way that you were awestruck by reading The Hunger Games or the Harry Potter books for the first time, your friends and family may feel the same way when they watch the movie adaptation.

 

 

4. Be Respectful Of Other People’s Opinions

 

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Image via the pewter wolf

 

Please do not be that person to throw insults around, or anything else for that matter. It’s completely unnecessary. Even if you feel you’re justified by so called “common sense”, or believe you have the upper hand against someone who has never read the book be respectful!

No one is stupid for liking something you dislike. There is a reason why something was changed in the film from the book. The screenwriters saw the original content in a different light, they saw an opportunity to try something else, whatever the reason there will be other people to like it just as much as the filmmakers did. As mentioned before, we hold on to what we believe is best. Keeping an open mind may open your own eyes to something new, and more importantly, you’ll avoid being a total jerk.

 

 

5. Hollywood Needs To Make Money

 

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Surely they want money too, but honestly, who doesn’t. | Image via Giphy

 

Often angry fans seem to miss a major point about the filmmaking industry— movies cost money, a ridiculous amount of money at that!

Just to put things into perspective think about the cost of a movie versus a book. While book publishing involves paying the author, editor, and marketing team, Films involves teams of hundreds and hundreds of people. It can cost millions to create a film so they are going to want to bring back in as much money as they possibly can, and so they are going to go with the ideas that make them the most money.

 

 

And as a bonus for the most passionate of book-lovers…

 

 

6. Don’t Stay Mad Forever

 

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Image via Giphy

 

Some adaptations are just plain disappointing. Though there is a difference of opinion between people who’ve read the book and people who haven’t, that doesn’t mean you don’t have a right to a therapeutic rant. Once the film is over someone is bound to ask “what did you think?” This is your chance. Let it all out, without causing any public damages or hurt feelings of course. Once it’s all out take a deep breath and distract yourself with just about anything that won’t remind you of the catastrophe you just witnessed.

You have your whole life ahead of you, no need to be so mad about a bad film adaptation. You still have the original book in your heart.

 

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Image via Giphy

 

Hopefully these tips, and bonus tip, can help you to endure and/or recover from a book-based film that you weren’t too crazy about.

 

 

Featured Image via slance

Taleflick Launches ‘Marketplace’ for Creators to Connect

For those who don’t know, TaleFlick is a company that attempts to improve relationships between publishers and producers in Hollywood. It is where screenwriters and authors can share their scripts and books, so global creators of all kinds can search for a story and adapt it into a TV show or a movie. Now, TaleFlick has launched “The Marketplace”, an online platform built to push relationships even further. Now, publishers and agents can search for new and aspiring writers, as well as pieces of literature to represent, and writers have an opportunity to show their work to be seen by film and TV production companies through live channels.

 

Uri Singer, Founder of TaleFlick
Image Via KTLA

TaleFlick has a fee of $88 per book for writers and publishers. For one year, they get their book listed and they have access to the Marketplace. For the $399 “Plus” package, the TaleFlick team will also read the book, and compose a short “pitch page” which will accompany the listing to appeal to Hollywood readers.

“I thought there must be a better way to find good books. Not necessarily bestsellers, but good stories,” said producer Uri Singer, the founder of TaleFlick. “A platform where anyone, from anywhere in the world, could upload a book.”

 

Featured Image Via LinkedIn

See What Everyone Is Talking About With Our Top 5 Nonfiction Picks!

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just so we can ensure consistent, high-quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks center around the theme of current best-sellers, showcasing what nonfiction books are the biggest hits with audiences! Pick these up to see what everyone is talking about!

 

5. The Good Immigrant edited by Nikesh Shukla and Chimene Suleyman

 

An immigrant woman stands in a neon backdrop in an Art Deco style

Image Via Amazon

The Good Immigrant is an anthology of stories reflecting on the current state of immigrants and their relationship to America. The United States is consumed by hostile rhetoric over who is welcome across its borders and it seems that everyone’s rights are under attack. In this anthology, numerous writers offer stories about their cultural heritage and their complicated stories in the midst of this crisis. From analyzing cultural appropriation, to a detailing one author’s journey from Nigeria to America, and another author reconnecting with their Korean roots, these stories are emotional, tear jerking, but mandatory for anyone to read in this age.

 

4. The Lady from the Black Lagoon by Mallory O’meara

 

A woman sits over a desk drawing as a scaly reptilian arm looms over her

Image via Amazon

The Lady From the Black Lagoon by Mallory O’Meara examines the forgotten history of one of Hollywood’s best talents, a woman who was discriminated against and lost to history despite creating one of the most iconic monsters of all time. This is the story of Milicent Patrick, who was one of Disney’s first female animators and created The Creature From the Black Lagoon, a monster that became a staple of Universal’s library of nasties next to Dracula, Frankenstein, and the Wolfman. O’Meara sheds light on the history of Milicent Patrick, uncovering her early beginnings to her career in Hollywood, giving the woman the legacy she’s deserved for years.

 

3. The Sakura obsession by Naoko Abe

 

A Japanese man stands with an older gentleman next to a Japanese cherry blossom

Image via Amazon

The Sakura Obsession by Naoko Abe tells the true story of how an English eccentric saved Japan’s cherry blossoms from extinction. Collingwood Ingram visited Japan numerous times in the early 1900s, but by 1926 he was horrified to find the flowers were in sharp decline. Determined not to lose them, Ingram’s story chronicles how he used specimens he had taken to England and ferried them back to Japan, reintroducing them to the land and allowing them to flourish. A history of both cherry blossoms and a crazy English man with one hell of an obsession, this work is for any flower or history lover out there.

 

2. Surviving the Forest by Adiva Geffen

 

An old photograph of a woman looms over a dark forest

Image Via Amazon

Surviving the Forest  tells the true tale of a Jewish holocaust survivor from WWII, known as Shurka, who lived a quiet, lovely existence in Poland. But then, World War II broke out and the Germans invaded Shurka’s hometown. She was taken to a Jewish ghetto, where the Nazis were taking Jews to concentration camps, never to be seen again. Managing to escape the camp with her family, Shurka ends up in the dark forest wilderness of Poland. This is her story of survival, avoiding not only German patrols but the world around her, from wild animals, to natural hazards, to starvation. This is a remarkable work that isn’t easy to read but showcases one woman’s tenacity for survival in the darkest of circumstances.

 

1. Furious Hours by Casey Cep

 

A forest is lit by light

Image via Amazon

Furious Hours by Casey Cep uncovers the mystery surrounding beloved writer Harper Lee and the events that led to her beginning to write a true crime book in the vein of her childhood friend Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood. A reverend named Willie Maxwell was acquitted for the murder of a family of five before being shot dead himself. Harper Lee in later years was trying to write another book and chose the reverend as the central character of a nonfiction book about the murders. The case is told in three sections, the first part about Maxwell, the second about his lawyer that helped him avoid justice, and the third about Harper Lee herself trying to write about his case. This book not only offers research into a murder mystery but paints an evocative portrait of Lee herself, chronicling her life, her success, and her slow decline as she struggled with fame. This is a wonderfully researched work, full of brilliant detail that doesn’t leave a stone unturned.

 

 

Featured Image Via Amazon 

‘Captain Marvel’ Takes in $455 Million in First Week!

Captain Marvel’s weekend box office was a slam dunk success and powered higher than industry expectations imagined. According CNN Captain Marvel made $153 million, flying much higher than the estimated $130 million analysts speculated it would bring in. The film has brought in $455 million worldwide, which according to Forbes makes it the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s seventh best opening behind Avengers: Infinity War, The Avengers, Black Panther, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Captain America: Civil War, and Iron Man 3. 

 

Captain Marvel stands tall in a group shot from the film
Image Via Bloomberg

 

The film also surpassed Wonder Woman’s $103.5 million in 2017, making it the biggest female-led superhero film of all time. The film also gave a much needed jolt in the arm to the box office for 2019, as the movie industry’s box office was down 26% but thanks to Captain Marvel, the totals were up a huge 50%. The film currently sits with a gratifying ‘A’ Cinemascore from audiences and 79% on Rotten Tomatoes.

It remains to be seen how much Captain Marvel will continue to grow but considering how much it has already made in just three days, it’s safe to assume the superhero film will continue to ascend to even greater heights. The film stars Brie Larson, Samuel L. Jackson, Lashana Lynch, Ben Mendelsohn, Jude Law, and Goose, the cat. Go check out this film out!

 

 

Featured Image Via Variety