Tag: HBO

HBO Tell-All Book Promises a Deep Dive into the Network

With shows like The Sopranos, Westworld, The Wire, Sex and the City, Oz, and Game of Thrones, HBO is one of the most influential cable networks on television. And how the company came to be so big will be the subject of a new book.

Vox reports that journalist James Andrew Miller has started working on an oral history of the company, chronicling the founding of the company in 1972 to its current incarnation now that it is under the wing of AT&T.

 

Image Via Book Soup

 

According to sources familiar with the project, Miller has already interviewed several big-ups in the company for the book, which include businessmen and writers behind some of the network’s biggest hits.

 

 

This isn’t the first time Miller has covered a sprawling history of a company. Previously, Miller covered the history of other companies like ESPN, Saturday Night Live, and the Creative Arts Agency.

Images Via Amazon

 

So far, there is no publication date for the book.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Deadline

Alan Moore’s Recolored Watchmen Is Now on Sale!

Watchmen is often cited as one of the first pieces of superhero content to be regarded as ‘serious literature,’ helping to erase the stereotype that superhero stories are only for children.

 

Image via SyFy Wire

 

For those who don’t know, Watchmen takes place in an alternate 1980s, one where the U.S. won the Vietnam War. The plot follows retired heroes Rorschach, Nite Owl II, Silk Spectre II, Doctor Manhattan, and Ozymandias as they investigate the murder of one of their colleagues. Watchmen expertly uses each hero, and illuminates their individual backstories, highlighting larger societal issues and asking viewers to analyze intense moral gray-areas.

 

 

Watchmen, today, remains one of the most influential superhero tales in our current culture, and that’s why HBO’s adaptation has been so highly anticipated. Directed by Damon Lindelof, who is best known for his work on Lost and The Leftovers, this adaptation is set 30 years after the events of the original.

 

Image via Men’s Health

 

Many fans have been burned by the word ‘adaptation’ in recent years, as flops like Aladdin (2019), and Kim Possible (2018) are constantly being pumped out in a last-ditch attempt to capitalize on millennial nostalgia. Lindelof, feeling the pressure, posted a statement on Instagram that explains his intentions with handling the material.

Basically, he explains that he has no intentions of altering or disregarding the original work in any way, as Watchmen has been one of his favorite works since childhood. However, if you’d like to compare the two side by side, now is the time!

 

 

In celebration of the new series, Amazon is now selling Moore’s novel at the lowest price it’s ever been. In addition to the bargain, the book also features recolored pages created by Watchmen‘s illustrator, Dave Gibbons!

Fans are sure to love this updated edition to the classic, and can purchase it here!

 

 

 

Featured Image via Empire

Can You Guess the Bookish Emmy Winners (That Aren’t Game of Thrones)?

Last night the 71st Primetime Emmy Awards were the light of many viewers eyes. The final season of Game of Thrones might have lead the charge with no less than thirty-two nominations, but history was made when Billy Porter became the first openly gay black man to win an Emmy for outstanding lead actor in a drama series for his work in “Pose.”

In addition, Fleabag took home four Emmys, Chernobyl took home three, Ozark and The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel took home two each.

But besides Game of Thrones taking home Outstanding Drama Series (no comment) and Peter Dinkage taking home Outstanding Supporting Actor, do know what other bookish adaptations took home Emmys?

 

A Very English Scandal

Image Via IMDB

 

They were A Very English Scandal

 

Killing Eve

Image Via Amazon

 

…and Killing Eve.

 

 

A Very English Scandal is a true crime non-fiction novel by John Preston. Published on May 5th, 2016, the novel details how in 1979 Jeremy Thrope, a Liberal Party leader who served in Parliament, stood trial over accusations that he hired a hitman to kill his alleged ex-lover, Norman Scott.

The book details Thorpe’s early, secretive love life, at a time when sexual activity between men was illegal, his subsequent public exposure, and how he was acquitted at trial.

The Guardian described the novel as “a real page-turner” and claimed that it was “probably the most forensic, elegantly written and compelling account of one of the 20th century’s great political scandals”

Of course the book got an adaptation, and the three-part series that got a premiere on BBC One on May 20 2018 and on Amazon Prime on June 29 2018.

 

Jeremy Thrope and Norman Scott

Real Life VS Fiction / Image Via The New York Times

 

Hugh Grant stared in the show as Jeremy Thorpe, the former Liberal Party Leader,

Ben Whishaw portrayed Norman Josiffe/Norman Scott, Jeremy’s alleged lover…

 

Monica Dolan as Marion Thorpe

Image Via The Telegraph

 

…and Monica Dolan played Marion Thorpe, Jeremy’s wife.

The Rotten Tomatoes‘s critical consensus on the show reads, “Hugh Grant and Ben Whishaw impress in A Very English Scandal, an equally absorbing and appalling look at British politics and society” and Metacritic gave the miniseries a weighted average rating of 84 out of 100, based on 17 critics, indicating “universal acclaim”.

 

Hugh Grant

IMAGE VIA INDIE WIRE

 

Hugh Grant got a nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie, but lost to Jharrel Jerome’s portrayal of Korey Wise in When They See Us.

 

Russell T Davies

Image Via Radio Times

 

Russell T Davies got a nomination for “Best Writing for a Limited Series, Movie or Drama,” but lost to Craig Mazin, writer of HBO’s Chernobyl, the show that made HBO Viewers everywhere regret cancelling their HBO subscription when Game of Thrones ended.

 

Stephen Frears

Image Via DGA

 

Stephen Frears got a nomination for “Best Directing for a Limited Series”, but lost to Don Roy King, director of the always-funny-sometimes-hilarious Saturday Night Live.

 

Ben Whishaw

The Independent

 

Ben Whishaw got the nomination for “Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie,” but thing weren’t looking too good for him.

See, the real Norman Scott is the only one of the main cast still alive, and he told the Irish News back in May that:

Artistic license is fine but this isn’t my story. And there’s nothing funny about someone trying to kill you…I’m portrayed as this poor, mincing, little gay person … I also come across as a weakling and I’ve never been a weakling

Well, Ben Whishaw won the Emmy anyway for his portrayal of Norman Josiffe/Norman Scott.

 

 

Codename Villanelle

Image VIa Amazon

 

Codename Villanelle is a 2018 thriller novel by British author Luke Jennings. Published from 2014 until 2016, the novel is actually a compilation of four serial e-book novellas that follows both Villanelle and Eve Polastri.

Once a Russian orphan, Villanelle murdered the killers of her gangster father before being rescued from prison and trained as a hitwoman by a shadowy group called The Twelve.

Then we have the “dowdy but dogged MI5 agent” Eve Polastri, the agent assassinating with taking down Villanelle.

As Polastri gets closer and closer to Villanelle in her investigation, she develops an obsession with catching this killer while Villanelle interest in this MI5 agent also turns into an obsession.

Publishers Weekly praised the book as an “exceptional spy thriller” with “superior prose” and “cracker jack plot”,

Too juice to resist, the book was adapted by BBC America and renamed Killing Eve.

 

Sandra Oh as Eve Polastri

Image Via TV Line

 

It stars Sandra Oh as Eve Polastri…

 

Jodie Comer as Villanelle

Image Via Killing Eve Wiki – Fandom

 

…and Jodie Comer as Villanelle.

Interestingly, each of the show’s seasons has featured a different female showrunner: Phoebe Waller-Bridge was head writer of season one, while Emerald Fennell took over for season two. Suzanne Heathcote will serve as showrunner for season three.

Before we get ahead of ourselves and binge-watch season 3, let’s find out how season 2 held up at the Emmys…

 

 

To start, Killing Eve was nominated for “Outstanding Drama Series”, but to Emmy Awards-darling Game of Thrones.

 

Emerald Fennell

Image Via The Times

 

However, both Emerald Fennell and writing-team David Benioff and D.B. Weiss of Game of Thrones both ended up losing to Jesse Armstrong from Succession for the “Writing for a Drama Series” award.

Ozark was also repeatedly taking down Killing Eve.

 

Lisa Brühlmann

Image Via Cineuropa

 

Lisa Brühlmann might have got a nomination for “Directing for a Drama Series”, but Jason Bateman, director of Ozark, got the award.

 

Fiona Shaw

Image Via Den of Geek

 

And Fiona Shaw, along with Gwendoline Christie, Lena Headey, Sophie Turner, and Maisie Williams from Emmy Awards-darling Game of Thrones, all lost to Julia Garner from Ozark for “Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series”.

But before the end of the night was the “Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series” award where both Jodie Comer (Villanelle) and Sandra Oh (Polastri) were nominated. They faced off against Laura Linney from Ozark and Emilia Clarke from Game of Thrones, as well as a host of other talented actresses, but Jodie Comer won out in the end. Funny enough, Comer didn’t invite her parents because, get this, she didn’t think she had a chance.

 

 

So what do you think of these winners? What do you think of the non-adaptation winners? What show was your favorite?

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Deadlines

‘His Dark Materials’ Adaptation Gets Release Date From HBO

 

 

 

 

 

After a middling film adaptation in 2007, Phillip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy will be hitting the small screen, this time as a television series on HBO.

 

Image Via Nerds And Beyond

 

Based on the first novel in the series, The Golden Compass, the first season will follow Lyra as her search for her missing friend leads her to uncover a plot involving kidnapped children and she must travel through various parallel worlds to reunite with her uncle and save the world.

 

Image Via Amazon

 

Dafne Keen (Logan) will play Lyra, while James McAvoy (Glass) plays her uncle Asriel. Ruth Wilson (The Affair) plays the main villain, Mrs. Coulter. Lin-Manuel Miranda has also been cast in the series.

 

Image Via TVLine

 

With a stacked cast and HBO money behind it, fans can expect something epic from this new show. Thankfully, they don’t have to wait much longer.

It has been confirmed that the series will premiere on November 4th.

 

 

Are you excited for His Dark Materials?

 

 

 

Featured Image Via BBC

Don’t Clean Your Room! Read About The Top 8 Books About Dust

Riddle me this: What is everywhere in your room but doesn’t clutter up any space?

DUST!

Dust is actually very important, as far as books go. They can set a scene, they can create a mood, they can be an important plot element. So before you go off and clean your room or procrastinate about cleaning your room, you might just want to read through this list about our top 8 books that feature dust as an important element in the story.

 

 

8-Amelia Bedelia

 

Amelia Bedelia

Image Via Banres & Noble

 

Before we get dark, let’s start with a happy children’s book. Starting in 1963, Amelia Bedelia stars, well, Amelia Bedelia, which started this hit children’s series. Funny, brilliant, this stories often follow Amelia Bedelia, a maid in the Rodgers family, who often misunderstands various commands of her employer by always taking figures of speech and various terminology literally.

 

Dust The Strawberries

Image Via Teaching College English

 

Notably, she takes the command “dust the furniture” literally and, well, mayhem ensures.

Lucky, after a series of comic misunderstanding and general mayhem, Amelia Bedelia is usually able to the win the family over with a delicious pie or cake. After a while the Rodgers family becomes astute enough to realize that Amelia Bedelia takes everything they say literally so, instead of firing her, they give her more specific commands such as “undust the furniture”.

So remember: You shouldn’t ‘dust around the house’, you should ‘undust the house’. Or you can dust the house. I don’t care, you do you.

 

7-Cinderella

 

Cinderella book

Image Via Amazon

 

With that out of the way, let’s get dark. Dust can set a scene, set a mood, and you know that things are dark when this story opens with a little girl dusting the house while her step-mother and step-sisters are lounge around the house.

 

Cinderella dusting

Image Via Your Keyword Basket

 

Since her father’s death, Cinderella’s has been left in the dust, left in the squalor of her step-mother’s tyrannical rule. We all know where the story goes from here, either from the Disney movie or Grimm’s Fairy Tales, with her rising from the dust and into the arms of someone who loves her.

6-Infinity Gauntlet

 

Infinity Gauntlet Comic Book

Image Via The Wrap

 

Before the monsters of movies, Infinity War and Endgame, hit theaters, comic readers knew since 1991 that there was a chance our favorite heroes might get dusted. Though we weren’t sure if Disney was going to go through with it, we sat back in awe as our favorite characters, including Spider-Man, bit the dust.

If you want to see where this plot point came from, we’ll buy this comic and listen to Queen’s “Another One Bites The Dust” as you see characters you know and love and characters you don’t know but will love get dusted. Be warned:

 

 

It’s some heavy stuff.

 

 

5-Howl’s Moving Castle

 

Howl's Moving Castle

Image Via Hero Complex Gallery

 

Published in 1986, Howl’s Moving Castle is a fantasy novel by British author Diana Wynne Jones. A runner-up for the annual Boston Globe–Horn Book Award, the book was adapted into in 2004 was adapted as an animated film of the same name in 2004 and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.

 

Young and Old Sophie Hatter

Young and Old Sophie Hatter / Image Via Fairlight Books

 

The importance of dust cannot be understated. After her father dies, Sophie Hatter takes over her family’s hat shop but encounters some trouble when she meets a witch who believes Sophie is doing some magic in her territory. In the book Sophie’s guilty as charged, so the witch curses her into looking like an old woman.

She runs away and, cold alone, sneaks on board a moving castle. But she’s found out!

This is when dust comes into play. See, Sophie’s cover story is that, since the castle is old and dusty, she’s the new house keeper! A quick look around and everyone is satisfied with her story, and Sophie ends up actually cleaning the castle.

The story goes on from here, but the most important moral of the story is this: Dust is helpful.

 

4-The Help

 

The Help

Image VIa Amazon

 

Published in 2009, Kathryn Stockett’s The Help is about African Americans working in white households in Jackson, Mississippi, during the early 1960s.

A story about oppression, prejudiced, and hope, this story utilized dust to symbolize the hardships people go through and the impossibilities in cleaning away hatred.

 

3-Les Miserables

 

Les Miserables

Image Via VisitLondon

 

You might know the film, the play, or Victor Hugo’s magnum opus, this story shines a lighter on the misery and the pain of poverty and finding redemption in a cruel world. From the grimy streets of Paris to the dirt of the taverns, this story is known best for this image:

 

Les Miserables image: Cosette sweeping

Image Via Pinterest

 

There’s a reason for that. A young girl cursed to poverty, to survive and not thrive in a dirty world, she’ll have to work hard and, with a little luck, she might be given a new start and a clean slate.

 

 

2-Series of Unfortunate Events

 

Three orphans cleaning with toothbrushes because life sucks and then you die

Three orphans cleaning with toothbrushes because life sucks and then you die / Image Via Fast Company

 

In this series the Baudelaire orphans can’t catch a break. While they are bounced around to guardian after guardian, they are met with increasingly dire circumstances and squalor beyond repair. From a greedy man who just wants them for this vast fortune to a man engulfed in smoke who keeps them (including the baby!) working in a lumber mill, the orphans are no stranger to dust, grime, filth, and dusty things.

Thankfully, they never seem to catch a case of the sniffles, so I guess they’re lucky in that regard.

 

Count Olaf

Image Via Pinterest

 

Darkly funny and disturbingly horrific, this series is certainly something that’ll make you thankful because, even though dust seems to follow you everywhere you go, at least you’re not being chased by a villain.

If you are in fact being chased by an evil villain, considering calling 9-1-1.

 

1-His Dark Materials

 

His Dark Materials

Image Via The Verge

 

Does dust follow you everywhere you go? Well, that might be a good thing. In the His Dark Materials trilogy, dust are elementary particles associated with consciousness and are integral to the plot. Everyone is chasing dust.

In the first book, young Lyra is bombarded with adults who claim that dust is evil, a terrible particle that causes all the misery in the world. Even her father, Lord Asriel, tells her that

Somewhere out there is the origin of all the Dust, all the death, the sin, the misery, the destructiveness in the world. Human beings can’t see anything without wanting to destroy it, Lyra. That’s original sin. And I’m going to destroy it. Death is going to die.

In the first book, Lyra believes this wholeheartedly, but at the end of the novel her eyes are opened up to the wonders of dust when her daemon, Pantalaimon, asks her:

We’ve heard them all talk about Dust, and they’re so afraid of it, and you know what? We believed them, even though we could see what they were doing was wicked and evil and wrong…We thought Dust must be bad too, because they were grown up and they said so. But what if it isn’t?

From there, Lyra realizes:

If Dust were a good thing…If it were to be sought and welcomes and cherished..

‘We could look for it too, Pan!’ she said

The moral of the story? Don’t dust your house, because dust is magical.

 

 

Featured Image Via RZIM