Tag: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

The Rock Got Married! 6 Books About Rocks!

From CNN to the Tennessean, the news that Dwayne ‘The Rock Johnson’ has gotten married with Lauren Hashian is all over the place. The two songbirds announced via Instagram their sudden marriage, which they’ve managed to keep (mostly) secret from the press.

 

 

Johnson and Hashian met on the set of the 2007 film The Game Plan and since then everyone from their mother to their number-neighbor has been wondering when they would tie the knot. Already they have two daughters together, Jasmine Lia, three years old, and Tiana Gia, who’s only one!

But you might be wondering how we’re going to tie this story into books. Well, since you clearly didn’t read the title, let’s walk you through it.

  1. Dwayne Johnson is called “The Rock”
  2.  Dwayne Johnson is okay with being called “The Rock”. Proof below

 

3) Since The Rock likes to be called The Rock, we’re going to celebrate. Now The Rock might have written a book (The Rock Says), but this list is less about the best of the best, but more of instructive guide on the best books to learn about rocks, how to find rocks, how to befriend our rock, how to stick with our rock, how to eat our rock, and, finally, how to tie it all back into Harry Potter.

So let’s get started!

 

 

6-The Pebble in My Pocket: A History of Our Earth by Meredith Hooper

The Pebble in My Pocket: A History of Our Earth

Image Via Amazon

 

Are rocks pebbles? Are pebbles rocks? It seems out first step in uncovering all you need to knows about rocks is to learn about rocks. Thus, Meredith Hooper’s The Pebble in My Pocket: A History of Our Earth is our pick for how to learn about rocks.

 

A Page from "The Pebble in My Pocket: A History of Our Earth"

Image Via brownsbfs.co.uk

 

You can’t get a more epic beginning on earth than one that starts off with a fiery volcano! To show its massive scale we follow the story of a rock.

 

Another Page from "The Pebble in My Pocket: A History of Our Earth"

Image Via offamilylearningtogether.com

 

From there spectacular paintings give texture, weight, and movement with a stroke of a brush, we enter the mind of a rock as it goes through time. We learn about the processes of rock formation and erosion, learning that, ultimately, while the rock does come before the pebble, the rock is most certainly pebble (well, a million of them but you get the gist).

Want to learn about the rocks? Well, this book is one you should definitely carve up some time for.

 

5-Let’s Go Rock Collecting by Roma Gans

But now that we know a general history of rocks and pebbles, how can we find The Rock above all rocks? Well…

 

Go Outside!

Image Via Treehugger.com

 

Picture this: Mom tells you to go outside and so you go out the door, but there’s nothing outside but the blazing sun, grass, and dirt.

It’s a good thing you can read outside (unless it’s raining, but in that case why is Mom throwing you outside?) because this book has been helping kids of all ages since 1984!

 

Let's Go Rock Collecting

Image Via Amazon

 

Targeted at a five to ten year old demographic, this simple geology book will show you the wonders just hiding above and below the dirt.

It’s a guide on how to start a rock collection, educating children on the formation of rocks and how to categorize and recognize igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks, but it also teaches the history of how rocks shaped culture. Did you know the Romans built roads out of rocks? Great information, stunning watercolors, and gorgeous line drawings, this book will keep anyone engaged.

 

A Page from 'Let's Go Rock Collecting'

Image Via RainbowResource

 

Want to dig below the dirt and see you can find that The Rock above all rocks? Well, this book will help you out! Check out its rockin’ ad below.

 

 

4-Charlotte and the Rock by stephen W Martin

Now that we know about rocks and know how to find them, how do we care for our rock? Well…

 

Charlotte and the Rock

Image Via Amazon

 

A twist on Dr. Seuss’ What Pet Should I Get, this children’s book introduces us to Charlotte, a lovely little girl who wants one thing in this world: a pet. Her parent thus bestow her with a rock on her birthday.

While rocks can’t cuddle, fetch, or help her eat her vegetables, Carlotte loves her rock anyway. Sadly, no matter how much Charlotte loves her rock she will never be sure that her Rock loves her back, unless…

 

Wow!

Image Via Youtube

 

Beautiful on every page, this children’s book can warm those even with a heart of stone. Still, if you’re not sure you want to embark on this rocky road to friendship, then check out this awesome video below!

 

 

 

 

3-Stick and Stone by Beth Ferry

Now that we have a rock friend, how do we stick with our rock down this not-so-delicious rocky road of life? Well, given that stones are rocks, we present to you: Stick and Stone, a story of a friendship that will last the ages.

 

Stick and Stone

Image Via Amazon

 

A little backstory: We have a sentient stone named Stone who is all on his own. Sad, lonely, life is going too well for Stone. Then it all comes crashing down when a Pine Cone starts to harass, torment, and bully our dear Stone. Luckily, Stick comes to the rescue and the two strike up a close friendship. But how will Stone repay Stick?

 

Page from "Stick and Stone"

Image Via Thepicturebookparty

 

A story that teaches us that friendships can last through stick and thin, we, as well as Stone, will learn that sometimes just being there for our friend, be he a Stick or a Rock, is sometimes just enough.

 

2-Stone Soup by Jon J Muth

 

How do we eat our rock? The answer is quite simple, and this lovely little folk tale retold in this glorious picture book will help show us.

 

Jon J Muth's "Stone Soup"

Image Via Amazon

 

In war-torn village suspicions run high. Both windows and doors are locked shut, so these three hungry strangers have to get clever. They make a feast for a King, and it all starts with some stones.

 

Page from Jon J Muth's "Stone Soup"

The Village comes together thanks to the power of rocks/Image Via Pinterest

 

Stones are rocks, and thus Muth gives this old tale a fresh twist for anyone who wants to learn about the the strength of working together and, more importantly, how to eat rocks.

 

The Biggest batch of Stone Soup Eva

The Biggest batch of Stone Soup Eva/Image Via Redeemermorristown.org

 

 

Can you smell what the rock is cooking? Well, the rock says…

 

1-Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J K Rowling

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

Image Via Amazon

 

Whether you call it the philosopher’s the sorcerer’s, either way a rock set off our first Harry Potter adventure. He-Who-Must-Not-Have-A-Nose is back! and he’s looking for that precious rock to keep him alive. But Harry doesn’t know, and he’s got his own plate full.

 

Harry's scar

Who do you know with this tattoo?/Image Via Pinterest

 

He just found out he’s a wizard, he just met this big dude named Hagrid, he just met kid named Ron, he just met this girl named Hermione, he just met Draco, and now he’s the youngest Quddich Seeker in many-a-year in Hoggwarts long, very long, history. Despite all this, that stone will bring Harry and Lord Voldemort back on the track of destiny.

 

Harry and the stone

See?! Harry’s got a rock in his hand!/Image Via Pinterest

 

See, I tied Dwayne Johnson into Harry Potter? Now, before we leave, let me give you one bit of information.

 

TV Resolutions Explained

Image Via 9gag.com

 

That is all.

 

 

Featured Image Via Twitter User @theobach97

The Top 10 Most Mouthwatering Foods in Children’s Fiction

We’ve all craved a magical food that doesn’t actually exist, or we’ve read about a real food that didn’t live up to the hype of our childhood imaginations. Here are some of the foods (in no particular order) that still seem to appear in my dreams.

 

1. Everlasting Gobstoppers (Charlie and The Chocolate Factory)

 

Willy Wonka with an Everlasting Gobstopper

Image via iCollector

 

There are what feels like hundreds of candies within the walls of Willy Wonka’s factory, all of which sound absolutely mouthwatering. However, everlasting gobstoppers stick out to me because they actually exist. You can go down to your local corner store and buy a box right now if you really wanted to.

But you don’t want to. Because the real everlasting gobstoppers are flavorless little balls of cement. And the fictional ones are, well, fictional.

#JusticeForEverlastingGobstoppers

 

 

2. Fruit From the Toffee Tree (The Chronicles of Narnia)

 

An illustration of the toffee tree

Image via Citizen of Anvard

 

C.S. Lewis doesn’t do the most creative job of describing this treat. The fruit falls from a tree, and it’s described as being “not exactly like toffee – softer for one thing, and juicy – but like fruit which reminds one of toffee.

The tree formed when a toffee candy was planted in the ground in the moment of Narnia’s creation, and it grew at an incredible rate because the song that brought Narnia to life was still clinging to the world.

Must taste pretty good, with an epic backstory like that.

 

3. ‘Eat Me’ Cookies (Alice in Wonderland)

 

'eat me' cookies from Alice in Wonderland

Image via Amino Apps

 

There are a couple of bad side effects when you snack on these magical cookies. In Alice in Wonderland, Alice takes a bite of one these and grows to be about the height of a one-story house.

Yet somehow, that just makes them more tempting. What’s life without a little risk of becoming gargantuan?

 

4. Pasta Puttanesca (a Series of Unfortunate Events)

 

Pasta Puttanesca inspired by 'A Series of Unfortunate Events'

Image via Fiction-Food Café

 

Pasta puttanesca is a very real dish, and something you can order at most Italian restaurants. However, sometimes the way something tastes in reality just can’t compare to the way it tastes in your imagination.

In A Series of Unfortunate Events, the pasta puttanesca serves as a small amount of comfort in the bleak world that the Baudelaire children have found themselves in after the death of their parents. Something about the warm, homey feeling that it provides makes it an absolutely crave worthy dish.

 

5. Green Eggs and Ham (Green Eggs and Ham, obviously)

 

The cover of 'Green Eggs and Ham'

Image via io9

 

Sam-I-Am was pretty insistent about this dish. If someone follows you from a house, to a box, to a tree, to a train, to the dark, to the rain, to a boat just to get you to try a bite of their food then they’re probably insane.

But they probably also have some pretty good eats.

 

 

6. Leek and POTATO sOUP (Coraline)

 

Potato and leek soup

Image via Food Network

 

Coraline isn’t particularly excited by this dish, choosing instead to stick with her frozen mini-pizzas. However, considering the themes of family and parental love in this novel, this soup dish gives off a cozy and homey sort of vibe.

And if someone hands you a warm pot of homemade soup, that someone must love you an awful lot! Certainly more than your eyeless, soul stealing, puppet mom.

 

7. Saffron Tea (Kiki’s Delivery Service)

 

A moment from 'My Neighbor Totoro,' another Studio Ghibli film

Image via Studio Ghibli

 

Studio Ghibli, the Japanese animation studio, has a knack for animating foods in the most delicious looking way possible. This particular gif is from My Neighbor Totoro, as the saffron tea from Kiki’s Delivery Service didn’t make it’s way out of the book.

In the book the tea serves as a reminder of Kiki’s home while her travels become too much to handle. The smell and the warmth remind Kiki of her mother, and the memory helps keep her spirits high while she’s speeding around on her broom.

 

8. Unicorn Blood (Harry Potter Series)

 

A bleeding unicorn from 'Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone'

Image via Sci-Fi Stack Exchange

 

This one is a bit macabre, but there’s something undeniably intriguing about the unicorn blood in the Harry Potter.

The golden trio (plus Draco) are serving detention in the Forbidden Forest with Hagrid, when they stumble upon a pool of shiny silver goo. When they see a shadowy figure knelt over the body of the unicorn, the kids all run away screaming, except for Harry who stumbles over a tree root.

He’s saved by a centaur, the story moves on, and no one even asks for a sip of that shiny, magic goop.

Maybe this is why I never got my Hogwarts letter.

 

9. Magic Beans (Jack and the Beanstalk)

 

Some perfect beans

Image via Tourism Currents

 

If a bag of beans is worth selling your family’s only source of income, they better be some damn good beans.

 

 

10. Giant Chocolate Cake (Matilda)

 

The moment where Bruce Bogtrotter must eat a whole cake in 'Matilda'

Image via Giphy

 

Bruce Bogtrotter is one of literature’s bravest heroes. He’s punished for his humanity (what child wouldn’t try to sneak a piece of cake?) and still emerges triumphant despite all odds.

While this scene can be a bit nauseating, there’s always something enticing about the thought of having a triple layered chocolate cake plopped down directly in front of you.

Plus, you get to dive straight into that sucker fork first.

Might not be such a punishment after all.

 

 

 

Featured image via Simplemost

Is The ‘Harry Potter’ Series Middle-Grade or YA?

It’s J K Rowling’s birthday, which means it’s also Harry Potter’s birthday (it’s canon!), so let’s talk about the series.

Specifically, let’s tackle this ongoing debate: Is the Harry Potter series Middle-Grade or YA?

 

JK Rowling

Image Via Daily Express

 

For those unaware, middle-grade fiction is fiction aimed at readers between the ages of eight and twelve whereas YA, or Young Adult, is fiction aimed to readers who are thirteen to eighteen. See? Simple enough.

 

 

Not so. There’s a lot more that goes into books than the ages of their readers, so we have to get specific here. Lucky for us, Master Class defines both middle-grade and YA fiction using these useful bullet points, so those will be our foundation:

The characteristics that middle-grade fiction tends to share are:

  • They contain no profanity or graphic violence.
  • Romance is limited to crushes and first kisses.
  • Protagonists are roughly between the ages of 10 and 13.
  • Middle-grade novels are typically between 30,000 and 50,000 words long and voiced in the third person.
  • Characters typically react to what happens to them within their immediate world with a focus on friends and family.
  • The protagonist (and narrator) generally do not delve too much into self-reflection but instead focus on real-life situations.

The characteristics that young adult fiction tends to share are:

  • Profanity and graphic violence are permissible, reflecting the maturity of the reading group.
  • Romance is allowed, but not eroticism.
  • Protagonists are typically between 15 and 18 years old, reflecting the age of the reading group.
  • Young adult novels are generally 50,000 and 75,000 words, though fantasy does tend to exceed that length.
  • Young adult fiction is typically focused on how the main character fits in the ‘grown-up‘ world beyond their family and friends, reflecting on events and analyzing their meaning. to better understand themselves, their journey, and the world they are coming into
  • Because of the amount of self-reflection and internality, YA novels are often told in the first person from the protagonist’s point of view.

Examples of middle-grade would be Diary of a Wimpy KidCaptain Underpants, and the Goosebumps series, whereas examples of YA would be The Outsiders and The Fault in Our Stars.

Keep in mind that the points above aren’t hard and fast rules. Something can be YA and not hit all the points, something can be middle-grade are not hit all the points too. The long and short of it is they have to hit most of them.

 

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

Image Via Amazon

 

Using these definitions, it’s easy to determine that Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s/Philosopher’s Stone is most certainly middle-grade. There’s no profanity in the book except for Ron’s repeated exclamations of “Bloody hell!”

 

Ron Weasley Bloody Hell

Image Via Youtube

 

Let’s face it, kids can take that type of profanity. Maybe you won’t find that in a children’s book written by Dr. Seuss, but I could see you finding that ‘language’ in Diary of a Wimpy Kid.

The violence isn’t bloody and the only person who dies, Professor Quirrell, is off-screen in the book (not in the film, and I love it for it). There is no romance in the book. Harry’s much more concerned with safety and family.

At 76,944 words, the book is a little long for middle-grade, but, again, the rules listed above are not hard and fast ones.

Plus, since the eleven year old Harry Potter most certainly reacts to what happens to them within their immediate world with a focus on friends and family and doesn’t stop to ask, “Was knocking out that troll really the best thing I could do?”, than I’d say the first Harry Potter book is most certainly middle-grade.

 

Chamber of Secrets

Image Via Pinterest

 

Same goes for Chamber of Secrets. It’s a straight up mystery novel and Harry wants to find out who’s petrifying these poor children. Oh no! It was the bad guy all along, who’s still around thanks to his evil diary and the help of a giant snake! Heck, even though Ginny is obsessed with Harry, sending him a singing valentine. Harry just finds the whole thing embarrassing!

 

The Prisoner of Azkaban

Image Via Harry Potter Wiki – Fandom

 

While Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban still has Harry’s concerns mostly focused outwards and features no romance, but things are getting dicey. That man who’s a prisoner? He didn’t actually do it, and at the conclusion of the novel he hasn’t been proven innocent to the general public. Overall, the book is much more serious than the previous. The characters, such as Lupin and Sirus, are more ambiguous than the previous.

With Harry being fourteen, in the middle of what a typical middle-grade and YA protagonist is, we see Harry in his transitional phase as the series progresses to being a YA novel. Technically the book still might be middle-grade, but with a 107,253 word count I’m comfortable calling it YA because things are right on the cusp.

 

Goblet of Fire

Image Via Amazon

 

Things aren’t on the cusp in Goblet of Fire. Although there’s no profanity, there are some high intense situations involve a dragon and another involving mermaids and while there is no gore, an innocent boy by the name of Cedric Digory dies for absolute no reason. Romance is now front and center.

Harry finds himself smitten with Cho Chang from Ravenclaw and is jealous of Cedric Diggory who asked her to the Yule Ball before he had worked up the nerve while his best buddy Ron becomes oh so jealous that Victor Krum attends the ball with Hermione.

 

Did yah put yah name in da Goblet of Fiyah?!

Image Via Twitter

 

Harry is fifteen, young for a YA protagonist but still a YA protagonist. Harry’s not really on a mission to find out who put his name in the Goblet of Fire, he’s more concerned with social expectations. He’s looking into himself, most certainly, even if the book isn’t first person.

 

Order of the Phoenix

Image Via Amazon

 

Order of the Phoenix has Harry dealing with the fact the Ministry of Magic doesn’t believe that He-Who-Has-No-Nose is back. As a result, he starts getting rebellious. His angst-ridden interior very much has a YA voice. I don’t know about you, but this book gives me real Hunger Games vibes with Harry’s whole “I’m going to rebel” shtick even after a professor who loves the color pink and cats tortures him.

On the romantic side, Harry goes on his first date and has his first kiss. Both of which are with Cho, but those don’t go well. She’s still grieving her loss. Speaking of internal conflict, Harry’s dealing with the call to action to fight He-Who-Must-Not-Look-Human.

I’d call it YA.

 

Dead Sirius

Image Via Imgflip

 

Plus, that’s not even mention how Sirius bites the bullet in the end because of his murderous cousin.

 

Half-Blood Prince

Image Via Harry Potter Wiki – Fandom

 

Come Half-Blood Prince we have Ron dating Lavender Brown to make Hermione, and Harry getting on board with dating Ginny. Also typical of YA book, Henry has to look inwards: Does he want to put his friends and girlfriend in danger?

No, and that’s why his relationship with Ginny ends. It’s a very personal reason to end a relationship, and thus is why I’d call this book YA.

Plus, given that Snape becomes the most sympathetic before doing the most heinous thing in front of Harry, different things are getting ambiguous and thus adding to Harry’s internal conflict.

 

Deathly Hallows

Image Via Barnes & Noble

 

In Deathly Hallows we get the conclusion to the series and the conclusion to all of these character arcs. Along the way, we see jealousy when Ron is influenced by the locket and thinks harry might just end up with Hermione, which means there’s a ton of internal conflict for both Ron and Harry. What should Harry do? Send his friend away, or try to resolve the situation? This only add to the fact that this is Ginny’s brother, and Harry misses Ginny like nobody else except a man head-over-heels.

With the conflict right at their doorstep, Harry, while he cares about them, focuses less on his friends and more on how to defeat He-Who’s-Name-Sounds-Like-Moldy-Wart.

Plus, Harry realizes how those around you can surprise you. Remember Snape, the sympathetic guy turned villain? Well, he’s the hero of this story who only killed Dumbledore because it was all apart of the plan. Also, things get a little gray when it turns out Snape was in love with Harry’s mom far before Harry’s Dad, James, came along.

Despite the fairy tale epilogue, this book I’d still call YA given it has Harry realizing how he can stand as his own person and do what he feels is right.

 

The complete Harry Potter series

Image Via Amazon

 

All in all, I’ll say whatever everyone else has said: The series grew up with its readers

But I don’t want to end it there. With the debate ongoing about whether or not how much or how little The Chronicles of Narnia is YA or how much or how little The Giver series is YA, the debate of what the Harry Potter series hasn’t ended just because one of the best articles you’ve ever read has been published.

 

 

Thus, I have to ask: does it even matter? On Harry Potter’s 20th anniversary, Vox wrote that “[Harry Potter] was a global sensation that everyone had to read, even adults…in a post- Harry Potter world, it is taken for granted that YA is universal”.

 

F Paul Wilson

Image Via VJ Books

 

At ThrillerFest 2019, F Paul Wilson was asked why he decided to write middle-grade fiction. His response was simply: after he went into Microsoft Word to check and see how many active and passives sentences he had. While on there, Microsoft also told him his reader level. “Didn’t have to change my style,” he noted, but it was helpful knowing the reading level when it came to marketing the book.

 

R L Stine

Image Via Fatherly

 

However, the best summation of middle-grade and YA came from R. L. Stine, who noted that, “The main difference between middle-grade and YA is ten dollars.”

 

 

 

Featured Image Via CBC.ca

The 5 Most Magical Unicorns in Literature

It truly is a wonderful world where we can collective say that today, April 9th, is National Unicorn Day. These mythical creatures have floated around in our popular consciousness since  the time of the Ancient Greeks and have continued to stay in our culture. Remember this?

 

Starbucks Unicorn Frappucino
Image Via Starbucks

It was delicious. So, in honor of these honored creatures that have both shaped and been shaped by our shared culture, let’s look at the 5 unicorns that been galloped pop culture.

5.  Not Quite a Narwhal

Not Quite Narwhal Cover

Image Via Amazon

Let’s start with a recent book. Published February 14th, 2017, we have Not Quite a NarwhalIt might not seem much, but this little picture book was nominated for Goodreads Choice Awards Best Picture Books, stunning both children and parents alike with its beautiful artwork…

 

Not Quite a Narwhal
IMAGE VIA SIMON & SCHUSTER
…and its themes of finding who you are and where you belong.
Not Quite A Narwhal, End Page
IMAGE VIA SIMON & SCHUSTER
Congrats to Jessie Sima! Clearly a talent author and illustrator, she has a lot to be proud of.
Unicorn from Narnia, illustration
Image Via The Chronicles of Narnia WIki
Let’s get serious now. A war is raging. The Evil White Witch is leading an attack against Aslan and, for the sake of all of Narnia, Aslan needs all the help he can get. Of course Unicorns join this great battle in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.
The Last Battle
Image Via Gavin Ortlund
But when Aslan needs everything to join him in the terrifying climax in The Last Battle against the devil God Tash, and with everyone from Eustace Scrubb to Lucy Pevensie, of course the unicorns are back.
“Dear King,” said the Unicorn, “I could almost wish you had, so that I might forgive it. Farewell. We have known great joys together. If Aslan gave me my choice I would choose no other life than the life I have had and no other death than the one we go to.”
Unicorns are an inspiration to us all.
Peter riding a unicorn
Image Via Narnia Fans

3. You Don’t Want a Unicorn

This book is no joke. In fact, it might save your life. Released on, February 14th, 2017 the information this book provides is so valuable that I can’t believe we’ve survived as a species this long without this crucial knowledge.

I’ve dilly-dallied enough. Ame Dyckman teams up with illustrator Liz Climo to create this laugh-out-loud hilarious book, You Don’t Want a Unicorn. It’s a cautionary tale taken to the extreme, asking us the hard hitting questions like: Are unicorns magical delight incarnate or are they a mythological menace?

 

You Don't Want a Unicorn book

Image Via Amazon

With images of a unicorn getting its horn stuck in a ceiling after a gentle hop to cupcakes you can’t eat all over the house (don’t ask where they come from), you’ll laugh until you have tears down your face. You might not think about this book right after you put it down, but, like a boomerang, it will come back…

…and at that moment you’ll realize that this story actually has broader themes. From pets to children, this cute cautionary tale gives you the right amount of laughter and the right amount of fear all rolled into one pretty (and disarming) package.

 

2. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Although a unicorn never shows up to properly stab Voldemort in his snake-like face, they do encounter each other. Unfortunately it’s in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone and Voldemort is on the back of Professor Quirrell. And he’s eating unicorn blood to sustain himself.

 

Image Via Harry Potter Wiki Fandom

Thanks JK. Why couldn’t a unicorn get revenge on Voldmort by stabbing him? Or at least at one point in the book the unicorn could have gotten in a quarrel in Professor Quirrell.

1. The Last Unicorn

Neil Gaiman is a fan (“I loved The Last Unicorn…”), George R R Martin is a fan, but are you a fan of Peter S. Beagle’s The Last Unicorn?

Image Via The Mary Sue

First published on March 25th, 1968, the book is about a unicorn named Lady Amalthea who realizes she is the last her kind. Setting out to find her compatriots, Lady Amalthea. Along the way she picks up the sorcerer Schmendrick and the bitter but hopeful Molly Grue.

This may seem to be a lighthearted journey, and in many ways it is — after all, it is a young adult child’s book — but within the pages are universal themes that reach beyond the words themselves. The book talks about death, fate, what when to fight and when not to fight, and what doing what needs to be done even if you don’t want to.

Cover for The Last UnicornImage Via Amazon

The novel deals with very adult themes, showing that unicorns can be used to express anything from purity to love to grief and heartache — in fact, unicorns can cover that cover the whole human spectrum of emotions, and that’s amazing considering they are usually just white horses with a horn on their head.

 

Featured Image Via Etsy