Tag: halloween

Check Out These Spooky Bookish Drink and Dessert Combos

Serve your ghoulish guests only the best at your literary Halloween party!

Click on the names of the drinks and the desserts to find the original source and/or recipe.

 

 

 

A Bloody Mary Shelley Cocktail with A Frankenstein Parfait

 

Images via The Printing Press Bar & Kitchen  and  Frog Prince Paperie

 

Mary Shelley, together with her beloved monster is meant to be!

The bitter and acidic flavor of a Bloody Mary goes perfect with a sweet vanilla parfait.

 

Polyjuice Potion with Butterbeer Fudge

 

Images via Buzzfeed and One Sweet Appetite

 

It’ll be a magical occasion once you bring out this drink and dessert combo!

Include apple in your potion and it will complement the fudge.

 

Poison Apple Cocktail with Snow White Apple Dumplings

 

Images via Thrillist and Feast of Starlight

 

This apple-based drink and dessert combination will send you to the cold afterlife, then bring you back to the warmth of home sweet home. Be careful who you take it from though, especially if you’ve been recently discovered as the fairest of them all.

 

 

Flame And Shadow Cocktail with Whitewalker Ice Cream

 

Images via Buzzfeed and Lets Eat Cake

 

Nothing says “A Song of Ice and Fire” quite like the combination of a fiery jalapeño-based cocktail with some chillingly sweet ice cream.

Is the cocktail too spicy for your taste buds? Well, the ice cream is sure to ease that pain away! If only it could heal the pain of all those character deaths…

 

The We’re All Mad Here Cocktail with Queen of Hearts Tarts

 

Images via Best of Las Vegas and Pinterest

 

Insanity and sweets combined, this is the perfect combo for Halloween! The cocktail also changes color when you add the little “drink me” bottle, adding more to the madness!

 

 

Hope these recipes bring you plenty of fun and sweetness for your Halloween!

 

Featured Image via Photocollage

Why We Love Being Scared by Horror Books and Movies

Horror is a genre that intrigues us because of its ability to terrify us and poke at our greatest fears. I believe that any mind-provoking book is a good book, but horror does more than provoke—it picks at our minds, invades us, and for whatever reason, this gives us a sense of excitement. So what’s the science behind scary stuff, and why do we love that adrenaline rush of fear?

 

 

The human body has hormones that trigger a flight or fight response as a reaction to fear, but when the body is in a setting that it knows its safe such as a roller coaster or haunted house, we’re able to enjoy that high-energy sensation of wanting to run or hide. Your frontal lobe is able to convince your body that you are physically okay, activating a response more akin to pleasure than panic. It’s similar to the adrenaline we get from being extremely happy or surprised, except fear is interpreted in a different way. Horror also represents creativity and allows us to delve into an unknown part of our minds.

 

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Image by the occult museum

 

It’s not just a matter of taste and adrenaline, either— there are two types of personalities in relation to fear and horror: those who are sensation-seeking, the avid readers of Stephen King who laugh at the worst jump scares because they enjoy being scared and want to be mentally challenged, versus those who exhibit more sensitive and fearful traits.

 

If you’re a horror lover who has seen every horror movie down to the goriest and the most disturbing, and you own a complete collection of Stephen King books, you’re probably sensation-seeking. You’ll probably also be the one who laughs at your friends when they hide their eyes in the movie theater. If you force your friends to prep you for every scary scene in advance and wake up screaming from nightmares of Pennywise from IT or, even worse, Charlie from Hereditary, you’re probably more sensitive and shy.

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image by alchetron

 

Those who love horror books or any type of spook tend to be extroverted and open to new experiences, but loving horror isn’t only for the bravest souls—it’s also a trait common in people with high levels of empathy. Understanding the emotions of a character on the page, even if it’s fear, helps us feel connected to the characters in books and movies.

 

 

Everyone is into horror nowadays and it’s hardly a disconcerting hobby, but readers still question the minds of horror writers like Stephen King.

The ideas for some of King’s books, like The Shining, came from his dreams (this interesting article lists the specific creation stories and original ideas for some of King’s novels), and it makes his readers wonder if he’s truly as twisted and creepy as the characters he creates. Who would dream up a man as terrible as Jack Torrance for fun, and who would write such a terrifying clown?

 

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image by the telegraph

Yet it’s still fun for us to read about these characters, and we’d be devastated if Stephen King stopped writing. There’s an article on Quora that asks, “Do you ever think Stephen King could be a seriously twisted person?” The responses to this question come from King fans who cite him as a family man and defend the uncontrollableness of the creative mind. So it’s more likely that Stephen King is just as creative and obsessed with adrenaline-inducing fear as the rest of us.

 

Feature image by The Thrillist

7 Hauntingly Horrible Halloween Costumes

Halloween is almost upon us! Or, at the very least, the time to plan ahead for Halloween is almost upon us!

It can be tempting to pick a costume based on one of your favorite characters, or a costume that really amps up the sex appeal. In order to save you from some spooky strife this season, here are some of literary characters you definitely should NOT dress up as this Halloween.

1. The Cat in the Hat (The Cat in the hat)

 

Image via Yandy

 

I had never heard of Yandy before I began compiling this list, but they seem to specialize in the sexualization of characters no one wanted to see in a sexual context. They also seem to only have one model. Get acquainted with her, she’s in a lot of these.

 

 

2. Alex (A ClockWork Orange)

 

Image via Popscreen

 

One of the many themes in A Clockwork Orange is the overexposure to pornography and sexual violence in our society. I’m not sure that Anthony Burgess would really appreciate this version of his iconic anti-hero.

Also, Alex is 15. In the movie adaptation he appears to be closer to 20, but the age discrepancy still seems worth mentioning.

 

3. OOmpa Loompa (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory)

 

Image via Buzzfeed

Why, Yandy? Why?

 

 

4. HandMaid (The Handmaid’s Tale)

 

Image via Bustle

I don’t need to explain why this one is problematic. You get it.

 

5. Hannibal Lector (Silence of the Lambs)

 

Image via Yandy

Yandy strikes again. If the lambs had stopped screaming, I think they’d start up again after seeing this.

 

6. Pippi Longstocking (Pippi Longstocking)

 

Image via Tattoopins

Considering that this Pippi is much less sexually charged than many of the ‘child character gone adult’ costumes, I think the most egregious thing about this particular outfit are the heels. Very bold to pair your office pumps with your Raggedy Ann dress.

 

 

7. The Grinch (How The grinch Stole Christmas)

 

Image via Yandy

This one is barely even a costume. It’s just green. You could switch that Grinch hat out for a Shrek hat and no one notice the difference.

Plus, there doesn’t need to be a sexy version of the Grinch, he’s already sexy enough…

 

Image via Tenor

Featured Image Via Yandy 

5 Timeless Dorian Gray Memes

The Picture of Dorian Gray is a horrifying and hilarious masterpiece, and as with it’s author, every single thing about it is iconic. Sure, it might have been heavily redacted and then also banned, but there’s still a lot to unpack, and how better to explore gothic literature than through memes? You already know.

 

No Biggie

Image via Meme

This is when I admit that I never watched iCarly as a kid. Goodness only knows why, but I can see now that I really missed out. Still, the hilarity of trying to play off an ostrich needs no context, and recast as Dorian and his posse it’s a whole other level. Nothing’s up! Just being super normal over here, not selling my soul even a little. Anyone want a smoothie?

 

Show Your True Self

Image via Pinterest

I feel like this is a pretty modern take, actually. We’re the generation that can see a lizard just doing its thing and be like… “same, bro”. If someone had a horrifying portrait of themselves in their living room we’d think it was ironic or avant garde, or at least a big mood. What an eccentric he is! Plus, he might’ve shown a little more self control if he was looking at the consequences, even if he wasn’t wearing them.

 

Guess How He Looks Now

Image via Sizzle

I love how this trope started as clickbait and turned into a meme. Who cares about how child actors look now? Not me, and clearly not a lot of people, because it’s been eons since I saw a version of this that wasn’t a joke. Of course, this is a little funnier than the average fare, though. It actually manages to make me feel old, because I’m laughing at a Dorian Gray meme. No judgement. I’m just saying.

 

No Good Deed

Image via Gramha

You think you know someone. You paint them, you have all this sexual tension, you grant them eternal life, and what do you get as thanks? Nothing good, I’ll tell you that. It’s just like the saying. I don’t really have an excuse for using a meme this out of vogue, except to say that I still think it’s funny. We may all be used to airpods now, but I still accidentally talk to people wearing them. Not usually to warn them of their impending murder, though.

 

Art is so Powerful

Image via Tumblr

Basil really does get the treatment usually reserved for women burned as witches. Sure, he can do something supernatural, maybe, but on it’s face, it’s only helping Dorian. Like, no one made him act like a careless lech or drink all that. If I had a portrait that granted me eternal life, I don’t know what I’d do, but not what Dorian did for sure. Basil was just trying to be, you know, a bro.

 

Featured image via Dorian Gray Suggests

7 Nostalgic Spooky Stories to Put You in the Halloween Mood

One of the major themes of books and movies this year seems to be nostalgia. Everyone is constantly looking for a hint of that childhood magic and mystery, and with Halloween coming up, it’s a perfect time to revisit some of our favorite scary stories reminiscent of elementary and middle school Halloween parties. Here’s a list of seven of our favorite childhood spooks.

 

1. The Black cat by edgar allan poe

 

theblackcatcadabrabanner1200x627 - Exclusive: Cadabra Records is Back With Edgar Allan Poe's THE BLACK CAT

Image via dreadcentral

 

There are so many perfectly disturbing Poe stories that are suitable for Halloween, most of which feature themes of delusion, madness, and all-around creepy vibes. The Black Cat is one such story about a normally docile man who lashes out at his pet cat in a fit of rage while under the influence of alcohol. Poe describes the man cutting out his cat’s eye in horrific detail, and after the man comes back to his senses, a combination of alcoholism and guilt continue to drive him to madness. The man finally snaps and attacks his cat once again, but his actions lead to an even more gruesome, unexpected death. In typical Poe fashion, the man tries to bury his guilt until it returns to him in the form of the supernatural. This one’s sure to send shivers down your spine and may have traumatized you as a kid. It’s definitely not for cat fans!

 

2. The Monkey’s paw by w.w. jacobs

 

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image via comingsoon.net

 

If you remember The Monkey’s Paw from elementary or middle school, you probably remember being seriously spooked. The monkey’s paw is a charm from India that has the ability to grant three wishes to three different people. It had two other owners, the first of which used his final wish to take his own life before it ended up in Mr. White’s hands. But every time the White family makes a wish on the monkey’s paw, there’s a horrible catch. Their first wish for money results in the death of their son, Herbert, and the White family receives money as compensation for his death. In the midst of her grief, Mrs. White demands that her husband wish her son back to life. Just after he does, there’s an ominous knocking at the Whites’ door. This creepy story reawakens our childhood imagination and teaches us the ultimate lesson: Be careful what you wish for.

 

3. The Legend of sleepy hollow by Washington Irving

 

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image via fantasy & world music by the fiechters

 

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is a classic short story that tells the tale of Ichabod, a teacher living in smalltown Sleepy Hollow. Hoping to win the hand of Katrina Van Tassel, the daughter of one of the richest farmers in Sleepy Hollow, he goes to her father’s farm to win her over. But Brom Van Brunt, one of Katrina’s other potential suitors, is known for physically imitating anyone who tries to woo Katrina. Brom plays pranks on Ichabod until he gets frustrated, and as he’s heading home he runs into a creature far more terrifying than Brom. A dark figure riding a horse begins to follow Ichabod on his path home, and Ichabod notices—with utter horror—that the man’s head is detached from his body. The Headless Horseman throws his detached head at Ichabod, knocking him off his horse. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is spooky in a comforting kind of way. The world can’t be all bad as long as we have Sleepy Hollows with legends of Headless Horsemen. Or middle school legends of Bloody Mary hiding in the bathroom.

 

4. In a dark, dark room and other scary stories by Alvin Schwartz

 

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image via the paris review

 

In A Dark, Dark Room is a book to be read and chanted aloud, classroom-style. In the title story, things just keep getting darker and darker and spookier and spookier. Another memorable story in this collection is The Green Ribbon. It’s about a little girl named Jenny who always wears a green ribbon around her neck. When she grows older, her husband, Alfred, asks about the ribbon but she refuses to tell him. Once Jenny had grown old and was nearing her death, she removed the green ribbon and her head fell off. Jenny and her green ribbon are absolute proof that we pretended to be the bravest children ever (even though most of us were probably terrified.)

 

 

5. High beamS (Scary Stories To Tell In the Dark by Alvin Schwartz)

 

High Beams

image via scaryforkids

 

Scary Stories To Tell in the Dark is possibly the most nostalgic collection of spooky short stories of all. The movie was released this past month, but it’s worth revisiting the short stories and the movie in celebration of Halloween. There are three stories in the collection that are particularly terrifying, one of which is “High Beams,” a story about a woman driving home and paranoid about a man following her and flashing his headlights behind her. Once the woman gets home and runs inside calling for her dad, the man who had been following her explains he was trying to warn her about the person hiding in her backseat and holding a knife. This story is definitely shiver-inducing for anyone who’s ever driven alone in the dark.

 

6. “The red spot” (Scary Stories To Tell In the Dark)

 

 

“The Red Spot” is serious children’s—or adults’—body horror. In it, a girl gets a red boil on her face that turns out to be a bunch of spider eggs that hatch. Anyone will arachnophobia or a general disgust of eight-legged creatures has to shudder at that one, not to mention the horror movie-level illustration included with it.

 

7. “Harold” (Scary Stories To Tell In the Dark)

 

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image via refinery29

 

Finally, we have “Harold,” which might be the creepiest of all. It’s about two cowherds who hate a particular farmer and create a scarecrow imitation of him to taunt and spit at only to find that the scarecrow comes to life at night. One of the cowherds goes missing and when the other goes looking for him, he sees a giant version of Harold stretching out the bloody human skin of his friend. Serious childhood trauma right there.

 

 

Featured image via Dread Central