Tag: H.G.Wells

Celebrate Alien Abduction Day with Our Top 5 Alien Abduction Books!

Its Alien Abduction Day! It’s a day when the skies are watched carefully by those who wish to find UFOs or be abducted by aliens. Most people celebrate the day by either UFO watching or watching movies featuring extraterrestrials. But you can always read some books featuring our alien friends! Below are five books dealing with alien abductions, both fictional and…er…nonfictional.

A portrait of an alien, showing a strange humanoid with dark slant eyes and a slit-like nose

Image Via Goodreads

5. ‘Communion’ by Whitley Strieber

Communion by Whitley Strieber is a supposed real life account by Strieber’s potential encounters with aliens. Strieber offers no interpretation of whether these events were real or not, leaving the audience to decide that for themselves. You can decide whether Strieber’s account is real or not but the novel itself is worth the read, if only for Strieber’s terrifying account of the actual abductions. Dream-like and surreal, these accounts are seriously disturbing and will keep you up at night for sure. The novel gets bogged down near the end with Strieber’s philosophical ramblings of what the aliens wanted from him but the book itself is a must read for UFO fans.

A small Martian, a humanoid little green man with a big head, stands on the cover of the novel Little Green Men

Image Via Goodreads

4. ‘Little Green Men’ by Christopher Buckley

Little Green Men is a comedy bent on the alien abduction trope. It centers on a man called John Oliver Banion who is abducted by aliens. Believing the aliens abducted him for a purpose, he concludes that purpose is to force Washington to acknowledge the existence of extraterrestrials! He soon becomes a cult figure to millions who want the truth as well and has to choose between his career, life, family or seeing his new cause through to the end. Funny, satirical, and with great characters, Little Green Men is a hilarious read.

The cover to Lagoon, featuring a young woman surrounded by aquatic life under the sea

Image Via Amazon

3. ‘Lagoon’ by Nnedi Okorafor 

Lagoon details humanity’s first contact with aliens, as when an alien spaceship crashes into a lagoon off the coast of Lagos, the fifth most populated city in the world, Earth is changed forever. The novel follows a rapper, a biologist, and a rogue soldier who come together as the city begins to get out of control. As the government considers bombing the city and its own citizens begin to riot, this small group of people must work as one to ensure peaceful first contact. A unique and highly engaging novel that details aliens landing somewhere that isn’t America, Lagoon is a great, fast paced read.

The cover to Contact featuring a swirling nebula, the dark void of space, and the planet Earth

Image Via Goodreads

2. ‘Contact’ by Carl Sagan

The basis for the more famous nineties movie, Contact centers on a young woman receiving a message from supposed aliens and attempting to decipher their message then somehow heads into space to make contact with the extraterrestrials. Touching on themes on faith, science, and what it means to be human, Contact is intimidating to read, as its very focused on the realistic side of space travel, which means like of high minded scientific concepts/math thrown at the reader. But its a wonderful read nonetheless and the reveal at the end makes the whole journey worth it.

The cover to the War of the Worlds, featuring a towering tripod vaporizing a ship in the sea

Image Via Pixels

1. ‘War of the Worlds’ by H.G. Wells

You know it, you’ve watched it, but have you actually read it? War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells started it all. The popularity of aliens, alien invasions, and the human conflicts against them began with this book. The aliens come without warning, attacking London at the end of the nineteenth century. The war against the aliens is still just as hard hitting as it was back then, despite countless other alien invasion stories popping up by the thousand since. Most famous are the giant tripods, the aliens war machines that stomp their way through London, annihilating everything in sight with their death rays. A great and exciting pulpy read, War of the Worlds started it all but holds up very well.

Featured Image Via IO9

New ‘War Of The Worlds’ Adaptation Begins Filming

Another adaptation of H.G. Wells’ epic science-fiction novel War of the Worlds is coming to the small screen. Filming has begun in Bristol for an eight-episode miniseries from AGC Television.

First published in 1897, War of the Worlds was one of the first stories to deal with the concept of contact with extraterrestrial life and follows two protagonists, a father and daughter, as they try to survive an incoming attack from martians. Two of its most famous adaptations include a 1938 radio broadcast, which fooled people into thinking that aliens were actually invading, and a 2005 feature film directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Cruise and Dakota Fanning.

 

Movie poster for War of the Worlds starring Tom Cruise
Image Via Amazon

 

The miniseries will star Gabriel Byrne and Elizabeth McGovern and will be set in present day Europe as a re-imagining of the classic story. It is unknown when the series is scheduled to be released.

 

Gabriel Byrne and Elizabeth McGovern
Image Via The Hollywood Reporter

 

This is not to be confused with the BBC adaptation starring Rafe Spall and Eleanor Thompson which will be airing later this year.

 

 

Featured Image Via BloodyDisgusting

image

George R.R. Martin Pens Tribute to Classic Mars Science Fiction

The world’s favorite alien planet is back in the news this week (and not just because of The Martian adaptation!): scientists have discovered liquid water on Mars, a possible indication that there could be life on the Red Planet. One person who’s excited by the news is George R.R. Martin, who grew up reading about Mars in paperbacks and comic books. In a new piece written for the Guardian, he reflects on the literary history of Mars.

In the article, the author of A Game of Thrones traces the legacy of Martian science fiction from H.G. Wells and Edgar Rice Burroughs all the way to the present-day writers who appear in Old Mars, a collection of Martian stories that Martin edited. Throughout the piece, Martin draws connections between scientific exploration and literature. In particular, he focuses on the Mariner spacecrafts’ discoveries and how they put an end to the more imaginative portrayals of Mars.

Despite NASA’s injection of realism to the science fiction community, Martin’s Old Mars collection will feature retro-style Martian stories. Martin anticipates some backlash from his community, but he defends the collection, saying:

Purists and fans of “hard SF” and other people with sticks up their butts may howl that the stories in Old Mars are not “real science fiction”. So be it. Call them “space opera” or “space fantasy” or “retro-sf” or “skiffy”, any term you like. Me, I call them “stories”, and like all stories, they are rooted in the imagination. When you come right down to it, I don’t think “real” matters nearly as much as “cool”.

Check out Martin’s entire piece over at the Guardian – it’s well worth reading!

 

Featured image courtesy of http://bit.ly/1LUknHY

Stephen L., Staff Writer