Tag: graphic novels

Netflix’s Production Of “The Magic Order” Will Not Be Moving Forward

Deadline‘s author Nellie Andreeva released the announcement that Netflix’s production of The Magic Order will not be moving forward due to an assortment of reasons.

Andreeva goes on to say that “I hear a decision was made that the series as currently envisioned won’t move forward,” which seems to imply that there is still the possibility that this series will be picked up for a television or streaming production. Here’s to hoping!

One of the factors for halting production was due to the fact that the Czech republic, where The Magic Order was in pre-production, has reached a record level of COVID-19 infections. There was the indication that other reasons did exist for this decision, however those reasons were not stated.

image via Comics Beat

Mark Millar‘s series The Magic Order is a series of comic books that currently spans six issues that have been consolidated into one omnibus. Goodreads provides the following description of the series: “We live in a world where we’ve never seen a monster, and The Magic Order is the reason we sleep safely in our beds. Magic meets the Mob in The Magic Order, as five families of magicians — sworn to protect our world for generations — must battle an enemy who’s picking them off one by one. By day, they live among us as our neighbors, friends and co-workers, but by night they are the sorcerers, magicians and wizards that protect us from the forces of darkness…unless the darkness gets them first.”

Millar’s series is cited as one of the most bestselling comic book series in the past twenty years–which is no small feat!

While we wait for more news about what future this series has on the silver screen, we have the books to read and enjoy. Let’s hope for the best with this series!

Cover image via Engadget

Shyamalan’s New Movie, ‘Old,’ Coming in 2021

Filmmaker, M. Knight Shyamalan, known for spine-tingling horror films such as 'Signs', 'The Sixth Sense', and 'The Village', is in production for his next film, 'Old'.

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Are Comics Real Literature?

I recall a conversation that I had with my mother. I just returned from Barnes & Nobles with the final The Walking Dead compendium under my arm, and he asked me how I, an individual she considers quite well read in the classics of literature, can read something intended for children. While that may be a paraphrase of how exactly that interaction occurred, the implication of her inability to understand the value of a comic struck me.

It didn’t take me long to realize why my mother thought this way. She was born in the 60’s, the height of Betty and Veronica, the time when the only place you saw comics were on the magazine rack in a drug store, not amongst the works of great novelists in a bookstore. It was the time of Adam West’s Batman and, as she grew older, Lou Ferrigno’s The Incredible Hulk. In short, comics and comic characters were seen as nothing short of mindless children’s entertainment with nothing substantial to provide a grown adult with. They weren’t taken seriously.

Yet are they taken seriously now? Most definitely. You only have to look at Marvel Studios and see how influential their movies have been to modern pop culture. People openly wept when Tony Stark sacrificed himself at the end of Endgame. People furiously petitioned to shut down Rotten Tomatoes because they gave a negative review to Batman v. Superman. People even started using the “Wakanda Forever” salute from Black Panther as a symbol to celebrate black excellence, influencing the future of an entire political movement. I think it’s safe to say that people take the comic world very, very seriously.

But what about the books? Do those hold the same substance as the movies? Does Marvel Comics have the capacity to elicit the same emotions from their readers as Marvel Studies does with their audience? I believe firmly that the answer is yes. In Hulk: The End, Bruce Banner (and, by extension, the Hulk) is the last survivor of a nuclear holocaust. An old man now, and with only a floating camera left by an alien race to document the demise of the human species to talk to, Bruce aimlessly wanders what’s left of the world. Not only does Hulk: The End provide the reader with a beautiful character study of Bruce Banner, Hulk and the relationship the two have, but it also evokes the legend of Prometheus at the end (I won’t tell you why, though, so you go find the comic online for yourself!)

Image via Dark Age of Comics

Yet are comics books taken as seriously as the movies? While, over the years, the comic book industry has been booming (In 2015, the comic book industry in North America was worth over one billion dollars), there’s still a stigma attached to the medium, especially for the older generations. Despite this, comic books still hold just as much substance as novels, and are, most definitely, literature.

 

featured image via verge