Tag: gothic horror

15 Horror Books That Will Keep You Up All Night

Guaranteed to give you all the goosebumps you need this sinister season, the following list of spooktastic recommendations is your one-stop-shop for satisfying terror sessions. You won’t be able to put these intriguing novels down, and you won’t want to turn out the light.

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Carlos Ruiz Zafon

Carlos Ruiz Zafón, Author of ‘The Shadow of the Wind’, Dies of Colon Cancer

Carlos Ruiz Zafón, beloved author of bestseller ‘The Shadow of the Wind’, dies of colon cancer at 55.

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What Makes Mary Shelley’s ‘Frankenstein’ Relatable to Us

We all look for literature we can relate to.  Sometimes, we’ll read something that unfortunately doesn’t quite connect with us, and we may up wondering why we picked up the book in the first place. But one book that was published in 1818 and is still relevant today is Frankenstein by Mary Shelley.

 

image via origins

 

Mary Shelley was someone who had a difficult life from the moment she was born.  Her mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, died shortly after giving birth to her.  So, her father, William Godwin, and her stepmother, Mary Jane Clairmont, were the ones who raised her.

 

 

Mary experienced a lot of hardships in life.  Her stepmother never sent her to school, never appreciated her, and tried to get Godwin to focus more on her biological daughters.  She even lost her own three children after childbirth!  These painful experiences didn’t stop Mary, though, as she went on to write the famous novel we all know today.

 

The atmosphere in Frankenstein has elements of Mary’s own world: her passion and knack for detailing the natural world, the mountainous Swiss region, and loss.  The things that Mary writes about in her novel are things she has experienced herself.  Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein relates to us because of how much the characters lose.

 

 

image via study

 

Victor Frankenstein, the main character who creates the Creature (whom pop culture incorrectly calls Frankenstein!) experiences loss through the death of his loved ones.  The same applies to the very thing Frankenstein made; the creature loses his child-like innocence of the world and his unconditional kindness.  The novel itself embodies love and loss. Both are mutually exclusive, and something everyone knows all too well.

 

When we see Victor’s loved ones die, or the Creature slowly spiral downward, we feel the same torment that plagued Mary Shelley in her life.  This is what we all can relate to: loss.  Even if our experiences of it differ.

 

Featured image via  oupblog

 


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5 Timeless Dorian Gray Memes

The Picture of Dorian Gray is a horrifying and hilarious masterpiece, and as with it’s author, every single thing about it is iconic. Sure, it might have been heavily redacted and then also banned, but there’s still a lot to unpack, and how better to explore gothic literature than through memes? You already know.

 

No Biggie

Image via Meme

This is when I admit that I never watched iCarly as a kid. Goodness only knows why, but I can see now that I really missed out. Still, the hilarity of trying to play off an ostrich needs no context, and recast as Dorian and his posse it’s a whole other level. Nothing’s up! Just being super normal over here, not selling my soul even a little. Anyone want a smoothie?

 

Show Your True Self

Image via Pinterest

I feel like this is a pretty modern take, actually. We’re the generation that can see a lizard just doing its thing and be like… “same, bro”. If someone had a horrifying portrait of themselves in their living room we’d think it was ironic or avant garde, or at least a big mood. What an eccentric he is! Plus, he might’ve shown a little more self control if he was looking at the consequences, even if he wasn’t wearing them.

 

Guess How He Looks Now

Image via Sizzle

I love how this trope started as clickbait and turned into a meme. Who cares about how child actors look now? Not me, and clearly not a lot of people, because it’s been eons since I saw a version of this that wasn’t a joke. Of course, this is a little funnier than the average fare, though. It actually manages to make me feel old, because I’m laughing at a Dorian Gray meme. No judgement. I’m just saying.

 

No Good Deed

Image via Gramha

You think you know someone. You paint them, you have all this sexual tension, you grant them eternal life, and what do you get as thanks? Nothing good, I’ll tell you that. It’s just like the saying. I don’t really have an excuse for using a meme this out of vogue, except to say that I still think it’s funny. We may all be used to airpods now, but I still accidentally talk to people wearing them. Not usually to warn them of their impending murder, though.

 

Art is so Powerful

Image via Tumblr

Basil really does get the treatment usually reserved for women burned as witches. Sure, he can do something supernatural, maybe, but on it’s face, it’s only helping Dorian. Like, no one made him act like a careless lech or drink all that. If I had a portrait that granted me eternal life, I don’t know what I’d do, but not what Dorian did for sure. Basil was just trying to be, you know, a bro.

 

Featured image via Dorian Gray Suggests