Tag: Good Omens

There’s a Petition for Netflix to Cancel ‘Good Omens’ – Which Isn’t on Netflix

Neil Gaiman’s Good Omens is a darkly comical television series based on the novel of the same name. It tells the story of an angel and a demon teaming up to prevent the apocalypse. The book was adapted into a six-part miniseries and was met with positive reviews upon release. However, not everyone has responded to the series so warmly, and some are going so far as to try and cancel it all together.

 

Image Via Amazon

 

American Christian group Return To Order, a campaign centered around a book of the same name by John Horvat II, has started a petition to cancel Good Omens on the grounds that it is “another step to make Satanism appear normal, light and acceptable.”

 

Image Via Amazon

 

Among the complaints about the series are that God is voiced by a woman (Frances McDormand), the Antichrist is portrayed as a child and that the angel & demon are portrayed as friends instead of enemies.

 

There’s just one problem: the petition calls for Netflix to cancel the series, but it’s only available on Amazon Prime. This little oversight didn’t escape the eye of Neil Gaiman, who responded on Twitter in the best way possible.

 


As of right now, the petition has garnered a little over 20,000 signatures. Do you think the makers of the petition will correct their mistake?

 

 

 

 

Featured Image Via KCRW.

good omens

Neil Gaiman Loves Bad Reviews From Certain People

The highly anticipated Good Omens has arrived, but not without its unpleasant detractors. One Twitter user complained about the amount of diversity shown in the opening few minutes, and decided to whine about it to the show’s creator, Neil Gaiman. Gaiman then reminded him of his place in the world.

 

 

The show begins with Academy Award-winner Frances McDormand narrating as the voice of God. The story of Genesis then unfolds with Adam and Eve, who are played by black actors.

 

eveImage via Ars Technica

 

This was apparently offensive to certain people, and Gaiman had actually addressed this potential reaction during an interview with Slashfilm.

 

Slashfilm: Do you expect the black Adam and Eve to ruffle some feathers, since some devout people still assume they were white?

Gaiman: You’re talking here about a drama predicated on the idea that the antichrist might actually be a nice kid in which a demon and an angel are working against the orders of Heaven and incidentally Hell in order to stop the apocalypse from happening and save the world. On this basis, I think a black Adam and Eve is a nice way of letting anybody who would be significantly offended by any of those concepts know that they can stop watching this now. It is safe to turn off.

 

good omensImage via IMDb

 

Good Omens follows the demon Crowley, and the angel Aziraphale, who also happen to be best friends in love with each other, as they try stopping the apocalypse in spite of Heaven’s decision to end the world. But yeah, the thing that throws people off is Adam and Eve’s skin color.

It’s nice to see that Gaiman can deal with these unpleasantries with grace and wit.

 

 

Featured Image via LATimes

good omens

Neil Gaiman Fought to Keep This ‘Good Omens’ Scene

The upcoming release of Good Omens will be a bittersweet one, given that co-creator Terry Pratchett is no longer with us. No expense was spared to make his narrative contributions come to life, especially under the watch of co-creator Neil Gaiman.

io9 reports that Gaiman was keen on filming a small, yet expensive scene during the TV series’ production. The scene featured one of Pratchett’s characters, Agnes Nutter, played by Josie Lawrence, getting burned at the stake in front of a village crowd for practicing witchcraft.

 

good omensImage via io9

 

Agnes’s character is more important to the backstory and world-building of Crowley and Aziraphale’s journey to stop the apocalypse than the story itself. However, when production raised concerns about the scene’s cost and proposed a budget-friendly solution, Gaiman couldn’t bring himself to exclude Pratchett’s creation. (It would also be a little awkward to remove the Agnes Nutter character from a book called Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch.)

 

It was a huge, complicated and incredibly expensive shoot, with bonfires built and primed to explode as well as huge crowds in costumes. It had to feel just like an English village in the 1640s, and of course everyone asked if there was a cheap way of doing it. One suggestion was that we could tell the story using old-fashioned woodcuts and have the narrator take us through what happened, but I just thought, ‘No’. Because I had brought aspects of the story like Crowley and the baby swap along to the mix, and Terry created Agnes Nutter.

So, if I had cut out Agnes then I wouldn’t be doing right by the person who gave me this job. Terry would’ve rolled over in his grave.

 

good omens

Image via Amazon

 

It’s touching to see Gaiman’s consideration and loyalty to his beloved co-writer. A deal originally dictated that an adaptation would only be possible if both creators were attached to the project, until Gaiman received a posthumous from Pratchett himself, requesting that he adapt it.

 

Good Omens hits Amazon on May 31st.

 

Featured Image via The Verge

Get Excited for the New ‘Good Omens’ Trailer!

The television adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s Good Omens is gearing up for the end times in this new short trailer.

 

Starring Michael Sheen and David Tennant, it tells the story of an angel and a demon who attempt to stop the apocalypse after the birth of the son of Satan. The series will consist of six episodes and all will be released on May 31st on Amazon Prime.

 


This new forty-five-second trailer features a sinister lullaby from Tennant’s character, Crowley, and some more images of impending doom, hinting at an epic battle for the fate of the world.

 

Are you excited for this new series?

 

 

Featured Image Via The Verge

"Happy Hour": 3 cartoon alcoholic beverages smile, as if not knowing they will soon be consumed

Booze & Books(tr): 7 Cocktail Pairings to Get You Lit(erary)

It’s Thirsty Thursday, and Bookstr is bringing you Booze & Books, our newest weekly feature dedicated to drinking games and booze-book pairings. This week, we’re bringing you another booze & book pairing. Our recommendation? Any booze and any book. Since that’s a little too general, we’re going to be paring classic & popular novels with cocktails to help you get what all the buzz is about. Admittedly, some of these cocktails are pretty vile. But since vile people often feature heavily in books, the drinks make for appropriate pairings. (That is, these cocktails are nasty unless you actually WANT to put milk into beer. If you do, you may be one of the aforementioned vile people.)

So, friends, read up & drink up. By the end of this list, these pages won’t be the only thing turnt.

Remember: drink responsibly and read voraciously!

 

1. The Great Gatsby – Long Island iced Tea

 

'The Great Gatsby' & Long Island Iced Tea

Images Via Amazon & liquor.com

 

Ingredients: Gin, white rum, silver tequila, vodka, triple sec, simple syrup, lemon juice, cola. Alternatively, whatever you found in your mom’s cabinets dumped into the sublte water bottle that clearly no longer contains water.

Now, I know what you’re thinking. Why didn’t I pair The Great Gatsby with a classy beverage, like a Tom Collins or anything with an umbrella in it? It’s pretty simple—Gatsby’s not all that classy of a guy. He may have some serious panache, but in the end, he’s new-money who likes to show off what he’s got: the biggest house, the best parties, the hottest ride. It all seems romantic because it’s set in the roaring 20s, but if this were the 2000s Gatsby was after a girl who went to the Ivies while he got a practical degree at State, you know he’d be trying to impress her with his McMansion and excessive Instagram stories of his house parties. ESPECIALLY given that the novel is set on Long Island, a place that may as well have been named after the drink.

Also, a Long Island Iced Tea will get you drunk, which is maybe the only thing you’ll have in common with this cast of high-society characters.

 

 

2. Landline – 1-900-FUK-MEUP

 

'Landline' by Rainbow Rowell & 1-900-FUK-MEUP

Images Via Amazon & Drinking.land

 

Ingredients: Absolut Kurant, Grand Marnier, Chambord raspberry liqueur, Midori melon liqueur, Malibu rum, Amaretto, cranberry juice, pineapple juice, whatever tears you have left to cry. 

‘1-900-FUK-MEUP’ is an accurate description, both of the story and what the story does to our fragile little hearts. If you’re not familiar with this newer release from #1 bestselling author Rainbow Rowell, the gist is that Georgie, a TV writer in a failing marriage, discovers a way to communicate with her husband—a phone that makes calls to the past. It seems like a second chance, an opportunity to talk to a younger Neal and fix the problems in their marriage before they begin. But maybe fixing the relationship isn’t the thing Georgie is supposed to do. Maybe she’s supposed to prevent it from happening. Emotional, right? Drink up.

 

3. The Metamorphosis – A Short Trip to Hell

 

'The Metamorphosis' by Franz Kafka & A Short Trip to Hell

Image Via Amazon & Relish.com

 

Ingredients: Peach, strawberry, and wildberry Schnapps, Red Bull, Jägermeister, profound existential pain.

At only fifty-five pages, Franz Kafka’s novelette is a short trip down into the blackest depths of human consciousness. If you can for a moment forget that you’re alone in the world and strapped to a mortal body that may never reflect your internal self-perception, Kafka is here to make sure you remember. We’re all just bugs on this Earth, baby!

 

4. Equus – Horse Jizz

 

'Equus' & Horse Jizz

Image Via Amazon & PROOF.MEDIA

 

Ingredients: Beer, milk, a sudden loss of dignity.

Whether or not you’ve read Equus, just look at that cover and tell me the pairing doesn’t work.

Also, don’t Google search ‘horse jizz.’

 

5. The Old Man and the Sea – The Old Man and tHE sEA 

 

'The Old Man and The Sea' & Drunken Sailor

Image Via Amazon & Chilled magazine

 

Ingredients: Rum, Luxardo Maraschino, lime juice, grapefruit juice, years of substance abuse.

Of course Hemingway, literary icon and known drunk, would have a cocktail named after his own work—an accomplishment that, while less impressive than naming a university wing after yourself, may or may not be cooler. Back in 1935, a mystery man in a Cuban bar downed a daiquiri that was left sitting unattended (classy move, E.H.). His response was as to-the-point as his dialogue: “that’s good, but I prefer it without sugar and double rum.”

Apparently, the reason Hemingway wanted less sugar was so he could drink more of them—which makes him as relatable as he was talented.

 

6. GOOD OMENS – The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse

 

'Good Omens' Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett & The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse

Images Via aMAZON & tiPSY bARTENDER

 

Ingredients: Jim Beam, Jack Daniels, Jameson, Johnnie Walker Black, Bacardi 151, at least one bad idea.

Listen: a flaming shot is a beverage that was not created for the flavor. If you start your night off drinking one of these, you’re going to be getting into some shenanigans. And shenanigans is basically the plot of Neil Gaiman and the late Terry Pratchett’s Good Omensshenanigans and the End of Days, which are, apparently, exactly the same thing. So why not drink this one at the end of the world? When you wake up the morning after, it’s going to feel like the apocalypse anyway.

 

 

7. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – Fearless Redneck

 

'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' & Fearless Redneck

Images Via Amazon & Inside Tailgating

 

Ingredients: Jim Beam Black Label Bourbon, Sobe No Fear energy drink, a blatant disregard for your own mortality.

You’ve got to be pretty fearless to start smoking at the age of eleven.

 

 

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Featured Image Via Giphy.