Tag: gone girl

8 of Michelle Obama’s Must-Reads

Book lovers and Obama supporters alike wait with anticipation every year to hear Barrack Obama’s book picks for that summer. Fortunately, you now have another round of books to choose from thanks to Michelle who has a few book recommendations of her own. Despite your ever-growing to-be-read pile, when Michelle Obama tells you to read a certain book, you listen!

Following the release of her own memoir, Becoming, Michelle reveals eight more must-reads in her “By the Book” interview, published on December 6, 2018 in the New York Times. Other titles come from an interview with Jenna Bush Hager and a memorial posted on Instagram for what would have been a Holocaust victim’s ninetieth birthday.

 

 

8-Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison

Song of Solomon

Image Via Image via The Stanford Daily

 

Part of the reason why Morrison received the 1993 Nobel Prize for Literature, Song of Solomon follows the life of Michigan native, Macon through his life as he searches for a sense of identity.

 

7-The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

The Girl on the Train

Image Via Image via Penguin Books Australia

 

Before the major motion picture, Rachel was just a girl who liked to ride the train everyday to London and back. It’s definitely not because the train passes her ex-husband’s house or the because she can see the perfect couple she envies so who live a few houses down. Definitely not.

 

 

6-White Teeth by Zadie Smith

White Teeth

Image Via Image via Book Riot

 

Smith’s London-centric novel follows two friends, one Bangladeshi and one Englishman, as they navigate family, friendship and life in the city.

 

5-Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Gone Girl

Image via Apple Books

 

The archetype for unreliable narrators, Gone Girl will have you guessing until the very last page. Follow Nick and her husband Amy who disappears, but why…and how…and where?

 

4-An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

An American Marriage

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Jones’ novel follows newlyweds who separate after a daunting rape trial. When they reunite later in life, things somehow get even more complicated.

 

 

3-Educated by Tara Westover

Educated

Image via Booktopia

 

Westover’s biographical memoir tells the story of how she fell in love with learning after growing up with little to none of it at all.

 

2-The Diary of Anne Frank by Anne Frank

The Diary of Anne Frank

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Frank’s diary which she kept as a young girl before her family was sent to concentration camps during the Holocaust relay the horrors of the terrible tragedy.

 

1-Commonwealth by Anne Patchett

Commonwealth

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Patchett’s bestseller tells the story of a family whose dynamic gets turned upside down at a family christening and what happens when that child grows up and decides to share that story.

 

 

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3 Unreliable Narrators That’ll Keep You Guessing

A reader always wants to feel like they know the narrator from their favorite books. We want to be able to trust the characters we have grown to love. But certain genres—mainly thrillers or horror novels—benefit from a first person perspective that may not always be the most reliable.

In these novels, the author manipulates their storytellers to build up a false sense of trust with the reader that lends to twists, turns and surprises. Don’t trust everything these lead characters have to say…or do…

awkward gone girl GIF by 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment
Image via Giphy

1. Amy in Gone Girl 

Gone Girl

Image Via IMDB

Made famous with a 2014 film adaptation, Gillian Flynn’s family thriller follows Amy through her thoughts, actions, journals and eventual disappearance. Flynn conjures up a shifty relationship between the reader and Amy as we struggle to label Amy as a villain, a hero or something in between. Gillian’s thought-provoking adventure into Amy’s mind makes the reader furl in frustration as arguably the most famous unreliable narrator in recent literary history.

 

the girl on the train GIF by eOneFilms
Image via Giphy

 

2. Rachel in The Girl on the Train

The Girl on the Train

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Also donned with a film adaptation, Paula Hawkins creates a similar air of mystery and distrust surrounding every character in her London based thriller. Rachel’s alcoholism and failed marriage evoke sympathy in the reader…

…before learning of her history of stalking as well as breaking and entering. As Rachel interacts with police after a disappearance, the reader grapples with what is fact and what is Rachel’s booze clouded fantasy.

The film GIF
Image via Giphy

 

 

3. Just about every character in Behind her Eyes

Behind Her Eyes

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Sarah Pinborough’s domestic thriller seems similar to those which came before with a husband, a wife and another woman. Always another woman. However, Pinborough artfully bends and twists her characters so soon you forget who you were supposed to trust at the beginning.

Even the most seasoned thriller bookworm detectives fall short at guessing the end of this confusing, mysterious and certainly distrustful novel. This ending will stick with you…trust me.

 

 

Feature Image via New York Public Library

‘Gone Girl’ Author Sickened Over Lawyer’s Comparison to Missing Woman Case

Jennifer Dulos was last seen May 24th shortly after dropping her kids off at school. The prime suspect in the case is her estranged husband, Fotis Dulos, and his new girlfriend, Michelle Troconis. Both were arrested June 2 for tampering with evidence and hindering the prosecution. Both are out on bond, but these aren’t the strangest events in the missing person’s case.

Jennifer Dulos, missing Connecticut Mom

image via new york daily news

Dulos’ lawyer has come up with what he calls the “Gone Girl” theory: Jennifer Dulos planted evidence and ran off in an attempt to fake her own death and framing her husband. Gillian Flynn, author of the New York Times Bestseller, is not having it.

In Flynn’s book, Gone Girl, the wife stages the scene of a violent crime in her shared home with her husband and disappears. The story is told through the eyes of her husband, who comes home to find her gone, and her old diary entries. Both are unreliable narrators, taking the story from a mystery that immediately implicates the husband to a story on how the wife planned on faking her own death. By comparing Jennifer Dulos’ case to Flynn’s book, they are belittling the very real issue of domestic violence, a threat that doesn’t disappear when a relationship ends.

'Gone Girl' movie and book cover side by side

image via screencrush

Norm Pattis, Fotis Dulos’ attorney, brought up Jennifer’s 500-page novel, which she wrote over seventeen years ago, in conjunction with Flynn’s work saying “We don’t know what had become of Jennifer, but the ‘Gone Girl’ hypothesis is very much on our mind.”

Flynn also responded to these comparisons with NBC News, saying:

I’ve seen in recent coverage that Jennifer’s husband and his defense attorney have put forward a so-called ‘Gone Girl theory’ to explain Jennifer’s disappearance. It absolutely sickens me that a work of fiction written by me would be used by Fotis Dulos’s lawyer as a defense, and a hypothetical, sensationalized motive behind Jennifer’s very real and very tragic disappearance.

Gone Girl, which is also a major motion picture, is sensational because of the storytelling elements Flynn uses to capture the emotions of the reader and shock them with the ending. The truth of the matter is that it is far more likely Fotis Dulos is behind his wife’s disappearance due to trends in violence among men and women than it is that Jennifer Dulos is faking her own death.

Carrie Luft, a representative of Jennifer’s friends and family, also responded to Pattis’ outlandish comparison stating, “Jennifer is not here to protect her children, and these false and irresponsible allegations hurt the children now and into the future.”

featured image via world times news
flynn

Female Rage Is Real and Shouldn’t Be Minimized, Says ‘Gone Girl’ Author Gillian Flynn

Female rage is at the forefront of Gillian Flynn’s novels. Her memorable female protagonists, including Amy Dunne (Gone Girl) and Camille Preaker (Sharp Objects), exemplify the complexities of emotion and behavior as well as how female anger is oppressed by societal gender rules. Through her complex protagonists, Flynn hopes to open the floor about female anger and cease ignoring and minimizing it. 

 

In an interview with Vanity Fair, In Flynn expressed her views towards female anger, why we ignore it, and why we need to let women voice their frustrations.

 

“I think there’s a deep societal fear of female rage, partly because it hasn’t been experienced a lot,” Flynn told Vanity Fair. “Men—I speak in vast generalities—are often very afraid of what they don’t know how to handle. And they haven’t had to handle female rage a lot, and they think they need to handle it.”

 

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Amy Adams as Camille Preaker in Sharp Objects (2018) | HBO

 

Flynn also discussed female anger, or lack thereof in regards to the #MeToo movement, a phenomenon which has heavily exposed the gross sexual harassment many women have experienced. According to Flynn, though the movement would be as an appropriate time as ever to voice female anger, many females have been urged to react differently.

 

But I’ll tell you what concerns me: there’s a lot of shushing going on. I keep doing these panel discussions where I hear women advising that we shouldn’t be angry, that we shouldn’t be approaching this [#MeToo moment] with anger, that we should embrace this moment with care and gentleness. And I think that’s insane.

 

“There’s a huge place for anger right now—particularly for the many, many women who’ve been violated—and this is a time to be angry. Let’s be very angry. Constructive anger is a very useful tool, and is a very important thing to express.”

 

Read the full interview here.

 

Feature Image Via Amazon/Meaww

Amy Adams

Get a First Look at Amy Adams in HBO’s ‘Sharp Objects’ Adaptation

Gillian Flynn’s debut novel Sharp Objects is coming to HBO in an eight-part miniseries and we’ve got our first look! Get your first look at Amy Adams and Patricia Clarkson, courtesy of Entertainment Weekly here.

 

 

Flynn wrote the screenplay for David Fincher’s 2014 Gone Girl adaptation, for which she won a Critics’ Choice Award. She has co-written the script for Sharp Objects alongside Marti Noxon (UnREAL). The series will be directed by Big Little Lies showrunner Jean-Marc Vallée.

 

Amy Adams stars as Camille Preaker and Patricia Clarkson plays her mother, Adora. Adams and Clarkson can essentially do no wrong, so their performances alone are worth the space on your DVR. But also it’s another female-led crime thriller from Vallée. You have reason to get hyped! To top it all off, the wait isn’t too long. Sharp Objects is set to premiere on HBO this summer.

 

Here is the book’s summary, courtesy of the publisher:

 

Fresh from a brief stay at a psych hospital, reporter Camille Preaker faces a troubling assignment: she must return to her tiny hometown to cover the murders of two preteen girls. For years, Camille has hardly spoken to her neurotic, hypochondriac mother or to the half-sister she barely knows: a beautiful thirteen-year-old with an eerie grip on the town. Now, installed in her old bedroom in her family’s Victorian mansion, Camille finds herself identifying with the young victims—a bit too strongly. Dogged by her own demons, she must unravel the psychological puzzle of her own past if she wants to get the story—and survive this homecoming.

 

Feature Image Via IMDb