Tag: gone girl

Off Broadway Production of ‘Three Sisters’ Cast

Anton Chekhov’s play, Three Sisters, is coming to Broadway. The play was originally written in 1900, and it centers on a conflict between illusions and reality, as well as three sisters who aren’t capable of changing their lives, but instead are squandering them in a provincial town. The very first performance of the play took place at the Moscow Art Theater and it is considered one of Chekhov’s best plays. Now, it is being adapted into an off Broadway production by Sam Gold, who will be the director. Clare Barron will be writing the screenplay.

Image result for the three sisters chekhov book cover

Image via Amazon

The actresses who will be portraying the sisters are Quincy Tyler Bernstine, who will be playing Olga, Irina will be played by Lola Kirke, and Greta Gerwig will be portraying Masha. Bernstine is an Obie Award winner, Kirke was in the hit movie based on the novel of the same name, Gone Girl, and Gerwig was just nominated for an Oscar for directing the (Oscar nominated) movie, Little Women. Gerwig isn’t only the award winner on the cast. Oscar Issac, of Star Wars fame, won a Golden Globe, and Steve Buscemi is a Golden Globe and Emmy award winner. Issac will be playing Vershinin, and Buscemi will be portraying Chebutykin.

 

Tony award winner Tony Ramos will be doing the costume design, and Andrew Liberman will be doing the set design, along with Brett J. Banakis. They, with others, will help bring this play to life once again. This will be the third reimagining of this play, and previews for it will begin on May 13, which is ahead of original date of June 1. It will run until July 12. Be sure to get tickets before then!

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Featured Image via The Economist

8 of Michelle Obama’s Must-Reads

Book lovers and Obama supporters alike wait with anticipation every year to hear Barrack Obama’s book picks for that summer. Fortunately, you now have another round of books to choose from thanks to Michelle who has a few book recommendations of her own. Despite your ever-growing to-be-read pile, when Michelle Obama tells you to read a certain book, you listen!

Following the release of her own memoir, Becoming, Michelle reveals eight more must-reads in her “By the Book” interview, published on December 6, 2018 in the New York Times. Other titles come from an interview with Jenna Bush Hager and a memorial posted on Instagram for what would have been a Holocaust victim’s ninetieth birthday.

 

 

8-Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison

Song of Solomon

Image Via Image via The Stanford Daily

 

Part of the reason why Morrison received the 1993 Nobel Prize for Literature, Song of Solomon follows the life of Michigan native, Macon through his life as he searches for a sense of identity.

 

7-The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

The Girl on the Train

Image Via Image via Penguin Books Australia

 

Before the major motion picture, Rachel was just a girl who liked to ride the train everyday to London and back. It’s definitely not because the train passes her ex-husband’s house or the because she can see the perfect couple she envies so who live a few houses down. Definitely not.

 

 

6-White Teeth by Zadie Smith

White Teeth

Image Via Image via Book Riot

 

Smith’s London-centric novel follows two friends, one Bangladeshi and one Englishman, as they navigate family, friendship and life in the city.

 

5-Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Gone Girl

Image via Apple Books

 

The archetype for unreliable narrators, Gone Girl will have you guessing until the very last page. Follow Nick and her husband Amy who disappears, but why…and how…and where?

 

4-An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

An American Marriage

Image Via Image via Oneworld Publications

 

Jones’ novel follows newlyweds who separate after a daunting rape trial. When they reunite later in life, things somehow get even more complicated.

 

 

3-Educated by Tara Westover

Educated

Image via Booktopia

 

Westover’s biographical memoir tells the story of how she fell in love with learning after growing up with little to none of it at all.

 

2-The Diary of Anne Frank by Anne Frank

The Diary of Anne Frank

Image Via Image via Book Depository

 

Frank’s diary which she kept as a young girl before her family was sent to concentration camps during the Holocaust relay the horrors of the terrible tragedy.

 

1-Commonwealth by Anne Patchett

Commonwealth

Image Via Inprint

 

Patchett’s bestseller tells the story of a family whose dynamic gets turned upside down at a family christening and what happens when that child grows up and decides to share that story.

 

 

Featured Image via AARP

8 of Michelle Obama's Must-Reads

Book lovers and Obama supporters alike wait with anticipation every year to hear Barrack Obama’s book picks for that summer. Fortunately, you now have another round of books to choose from thanks to Michelle who has a few book recommendations of her own. Despite your ever-growing to-be-read pile, when Michelle Obama tells you to read a certain book, you listen!
Following the release of her own memoir, Becoming, Michelle reveals eight more must-reads in her “By the Book” interview, published on December 6, 2018 in the New York Times. Other titles come from an interview with Jenna Bush Hager and a memorial posted on Instagram for what would have been a Holocaust victim’s ninetieth birthday.
 

 

8-Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison

Song of Solomon

Image Via Image via The Stanford Daily

 
Part of the reason why Morrison received the 1993 Nobel Prize for Literature, Song of Solomon follows the life of Michigan native, Macon through his life as he searches for a sense of identity.
 

7-The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

The Girl on the Train

Image Via Image via Penguin Books Australia

 
Before the major motion picture, Rachel was just a girl who liked to ride the train everyday to London and back. It’s definitely not because the train passes her ex-husband’s house or the because she can see the perfect couple she envies so who live a few houses down. Definitely not.
 

 

6-White Teeth by Zadie Smith

White Teeth

Image Via Image via Book Riot

 
Smith’s London-centric novel follows two friends, one Bangladeshi and one Englishman, as they navigate family, friendship and life in the city.
 

5-Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Gone Girl

Image via Apple Books

 
The archetype for unreliable narrators, Gone Girl will have you guessing until the very last page. Follow Nick and her husband Amy who disappears, but why…and how…and where?
 

4-An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

An American Marriage

Image Via Image via Oneworld Publications

 
Jones’ novel follows newlyweds who separate after a daunting rape trial. When they reunite later in life, things somehow get even more complicated.
 

 

3-Educated by Tara Westover

Educated

Image via Booktopia

 
Westover’s biographical memoir tells the story of how she fell in love with learning after growing up with little to none of it at all.
 

2-The Diary of Anne Frank by Anne Frank

The Diary of Anne Frank

Image Via Image via Book Depository

 
Frank’s diary which she kept as a young girl before her family was sent to concentration camps during the Holocaust relay the horrors of the terrible tragedy.
 

1-Commonwealth by Anne Patchett

Commonwealth

Image Via Inprint

 
Patchett’s bestseller tells the story of a family whose dynamic gets turned upside down at a family christening and what happens when that child grows up and decides to share that story.
 

 
Featured Image via AARP

3 Unreliable Narrators That’ll Keep You Guessing

A reader always wants to feel like they know the narrator from their favorite books. We want to be able to trust the characters we have grown to love. But certain genres—mainly thrillers or horror novels—benefit from a first person perspective that may not always be the most reliable.

In these novels, the author manipulates their storytellers to build up a false sense of trust with the reader that lends to twists, turns and surprises. Don’t trust everything these lead characters have to say…or do…

awkward gone girl GIF by 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment
Image via Giphy

1. Amy in Gone Girl 

Gone Girl

Image Via IMDB

Made famous with a 2014 film adaptation, Gillian Flynn’s family thriller follows Amy through her thoughts, actions, journals and eventual disappearance. Flynn conjures up a shifty relationship between the reader and Amy as we struggle to label Amy as a villain, a hero or something in between. Gillian’s thought-provoking adventure into Amy’s mind makes the reader furl in frustration as arguably the most famous unreliable narrator in recent literary history.

 

the girl on the train GIF by eOneFilms
Image via Giphy

 

2. Rachel in The Girl on the Train

The Girl on the Train

Image Via Amazon

Also donned with a film adaptation, Paula Hawkins creates a similar air of mystery and distrust surrounding every character in her London based thriller. Rachel’s alcoholism and failed marriage evoke sympathy in the reader…

…before learning of her history of stalking as well as breaking and entering. As Rachel interacts with police after a disappearance, the reader grapples with what is fact and what is Rachel’s booze clouded fantasy.

The film GIF
Image via Giphy

 

 

3. Just about every character in Behind her Eyes

Behind Her Eyes

Image Via Amazon

Sarah Pinborough’s domestic thriller seems similar to those which came before with a husband, a wife and another woman. Always another woman. However, Pinborough artfully bends and twists her characters so soon you forget who you were supposed to trust at the beginning.

Even the most seasoned thriller bookworm detectives fall short at guessing the end of this confusing, mysterious and certainly distrustful novel. This ending will stick with you…trust me.

 

 

Feature Image via New York Public Library

3 Unreliable Narrators That'll Keep You Guessing

A reader always wants to feel like they know the narrator from their favorite books. We want to be able to trust the characters we have grown to love. But certain genres—mainly thrillers or horror novels—benefit from a first person perspective that may not always be the most reliable.
In these novels, the author manipulates their storytellers to build up a false sense of trust with the reader that lends to twists, turns and surprises. Don’t trust everything these lead characters have to say…or do…

awkward gone girl GIF by 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment
Image via Giphy

1. Amy in Gone Girl 

Gone Girl

Image Via IMDB

Made famous with a 2014 film adaptation, Gillian Flynn’s family thriller follows Amy through her thoughts, actions, journals and eventual disappearance. Flynn conjures up a shifty relationship between the reader and Amy as we struggle to label Amy as a villain, a hero or something in between. Gillian’s thought-provoking adventure into Amy’s mind makes the reader furl in frustration as arguably the most famous unreliable narrator in recent literary history.
 

the girl on the train GIF by eOneFilms
Image via Giphy

 

2. Rachel in The Girl on the Train

The Girl on the Train

Image Via Amazon

Also donned with a film adaptation, Paula Hawkins creates a similar air of mystery and distrust surrounding every character in her London based thriller. Rachel’s alcoholism and failed marriage evoke sympathy in the reader…
…before learning of her history of stalking as well as breaking and entering. As Rachel interacts with police after a disappearance, the reader grapples with what is fact and what is Rachel’s booze clouded fantasy.

The film GIF
Image via Giphy

 

 

3. Just about every character in Behind her Eyes

Behind Her Eyes

Image Via Amazon

Sarah Pinborough’s domestic thriller seems similar to those which came before with a husband, a wife and another woman. Always another woman. However, Pinborough artfully bends and twists her characters so soon you forget who you were supposed to trust at the beginning.
Even the most seasoned thriller bookworm detectives fall short at guessing the end of this confusing, mysterious and certainly distrustful novel. This ending will stick with you…trust me.
 
 
Feature Image via New York Public Library