Tag: goals

These 5 Books Will Change Your Life in 2019

Before the holiday, Bookstr had the pleasure of talking to Alec Penix, author of the faith based lifestyle book Seven Sundays. He told us all about his fitness journey and how faith helped him become his best self. Now, lucky for you, Alec has given us some amazing recommendations of books that he thinks can change your life in 2019! So sit back, and read all about how these books can help you improve your ambition, fitness, romantic life, mindfulness and finance.

 

 

 

Fitness: Make your body your temple this year!

Seven Sundays by Alec Penix

 

Image Via Amazon

Image Via Amazon  

 

A Biblically grounded, six-week plan to lead you on the path toward losing weight and getting healthier by focusing on the connections between spiritual and physical health.
So many of the books within the diet and fitness space focus on vanity or superficial reasons for striving for personal health and wellbeing. Is it any wonder then that a motivation that’s so surface-level has such a slim chance of working long-term?

 

But Alec Penix believes that all things are possible if you use faith as your bedrock.

Ambition: Get where you want to go this year!

As a Man Thinketh by James Allen

 

Image via Amazon

Image via Amazon 

Eminently quotable and full of practical advice for individuals who want to better themselves, As a Man Thinketh is an essential little volume published in 1902 which explains and promotes the direct connection between our thoughts and our happiness. Do you believe in the power of positive thinking — yet remain unclear as to how that power can be harnessed in your life?

 

James Allen’s As a Man Thinketh explains and promotes the direct connection between what we think and the direction our lives take. Part of the New Thought Movement, Allen reveals the secrets to having the most fulfilling existence possible, and it’s easier than any of us could have imagined. You, too, can learn how to master the output of your brain in order to obtain the personal success of which you have always — until now — merely dreamed.

Finance: Become the boss of your money!

Unshakeable by Tony Robbins

 

Image via Amazon

Image via Amazon

After interviewing fifty of the world’s greatest financial minds and penning the #1 New York Times bestseller Money: Master the Game, Tony Robbins returns with a step-by-step playbook, taking you on a journey to transform your financial life and accelerate your path to financial freedom. No matter your salary, your stage of life, or when you started, this book will provide the tools to help you achieve your financial goals more rapidly than you ever thought possible.

Robbins, who has coached more than fifty million people from 100 countries, is the world’s #1 life and business strategist. In this book, he teams up with Peter Mallouk, the only man in history to be ranked the #1 financial advisor in the US for three consecutive years by Barron’s. Together they reveal how to become unshakeable—someone who can not only maintain true peace of mind in a world of immense uncertainty, economic volatility, and unprecedented change, but who can profit from the fear that immobilizes so many.

In these pages, through plain English and inspiring stories, you’ll discover…

-How to put together a simple, actionable plan that will deliver true financial freedom.

-Strategies from the world’s top investors on how to protect yourself and your family and maximize profit from the inevitable crashes and corrections to come.

-How a few simple steps can add a decade or more of additional retirement income by discovering what your 401(k) provider doesn’t want you to know.

-The core four principles that most of the world’s greatest financial minds utilize so that you can maximize upside and minimize downside.

-The fastest way to put money back in your pocket: uncover the hidden fees and half truths of Wall Street—how the biggest firms keep you overpaying for underperformance.

-Master the mindset of true wealth and experience the fulfillment you deserve today.

 

Romance: Live the love life of your dreams in 2019!

The Five Love Languages by David Chapman

 

The Five Love Languages by David Chapman

Image Via Amazon

 

Simple ideas, lasting love

Falling in love is easy. Staying in love—that’s the challenge. How can you keep your relationship fresh and growing amid the demands, conflicts, and just plain boredom of everyday life?

In the #1 New York Times bestseller The 5 Love Languages, you’ll discover the secret that has transformed millions of relationships worldwide. Whether your relationship is flourishing or failing, Dr. Gary Chapman’s proven approach to showing and receiving love will help you experience deeper and richer levels of intimacy with your partner—starting today.

The 5 Love Languages is as practical as it is insightful. Updated to reflect the complexities of relationships today, this new edition reveals intrinsic truths and applies relevant, actionable wisdom in ways that work.

Includes the Couple’s Personal Profile assessment so you can discover your love language and that of your loved one.

 

 

Mindfulness: Give your mind space to manifest your dreams!

Ask and It Is Given by Esther and Gerry Hicks

 

Image Via Amazon

Image Via Amazon 

Ask and It Is Given, by Esther and Jerry Hicks, which presents the teachings of the nonphysical entity Abraham, will help you learn how to manifest your desires so that you’re living the joyous and fulfilling life you deserve.

As you read, you’ll come to understand how your relationships, health issues, finances, career concerns, and more are influenced by the Universal laws that govern your time/space reality- and you’ll discover powerful processes that will help you go with the positive flow of life.

It’s your birthright to live a life filled with everything that is good- and this book will show you how to make it so in every way!

 

 

All synopses, featured images via Amazon

New Year Drinks

Quotes to Help You Kick Off 2019 With a Bang

The new year has begun and it’s time to take advantage of another fresh start. Hopefully these quotes will help you look ahead to new experiences and memories to come!

 

 

“Whatever it is you’re scared of doing, Do it. Make your mistakes, next year and forever.” -Neil Gaiman

 


 

“Hope smiles from the threshold of the year to come, whispering ‘it will be happier.'” -Alfred Tennyson

 


 

“My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive.” -Maya Angelou

 


 

“There are still many causes worth sacrificing for, so much history yet to be made.” -Michelle Obama

 


 

“Let us make our future now, and let us make our dreams tomorrow’s reality.” -Malala Yousafzai

 


 

“Nothing is impossible. The word itself says ‘I’m possible!’” -Audrey Hepburn

 


 

“You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” -C.S. Lewis

 


 

“We must be willing to let go of the life we planned so as to have the life that is waiting for us.” -Joseph Campbell

 


 

“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.” -Albert Einstein

 


 

“You know, my motto is ‘Excelsior.’ That’s an old word that means ‘upward and onward to greater glory.'” -Stan Lee

 

 

 

Featured Image via Sedona Verde Valley

2019

10 Reading Resolutions for the New Year

Everybody has that one friend who powers through seventy books in a year. Maybe you’ve got more than one friend who does this, and you’re the friend who doesn’t. Or maybe you are the friend who reads seventy books a year, driven by the knowledge that you—even you, of all people—will never be able to read them all. Reading goals depend on the person setting them, and no goal is better than any other. Most people want to read more, regardless of how much more actually is. Here’s the thing—you can read more and have a better time doing it. So here’s a list of New Years’ resolutions that don’t involve going to the gym.

1. Snag a book from your favorite author’s Goodreads page

 

Maggie Stiefvater's "read" shelf on Goodreads

 

Let’s assume your favorite author likes to read—that’s probably part of how they became your favorite author. (If your favorite author doesn’t like to read, maybe pick a new one.) Many authors have presences on Goodreads, but some actually use the site themselves. If you love an author’s actual writing just as much as you love their stories, search their profile for their own reviews and ratings. Chances are, you’ll find a new favorite book.

 

2. Read a book with friends

 

A group of friends reads 'Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass' by Meg Medina

Image Via Exchange.org

 

This doesn’t mean ‘read a book at the same time as your friend.’ It means read it with them. Choose the right book (or the right friend) and discuss your opinions, feelings, and reactions with each other. (Note: it still counts as a discussion if the reaction is !!!!!) Set specific places to check in and discuss—after part II, around 100 pages, etc. If one of you pulls ahead, the other will have to catch up before the faster-reading friend gets lowkey pissed. Peer pressure: now offering you more than cheap liquor and ill-conceived high school relationships.

 

3. Borrow from a friend

 

A flowchart to determine whether or not you can borrow my book.

Image Via Epicreads.com

 

Here’s the logic: if you borrow it, you’ll have to give it back. When you give it back, your friend will ask if you liked it. And if you admit you didn’t actually read it, you’ll probably feel like an idiot.

 

4. Try a new genre

 

Three popular genre works, including super-famous 'Children of Blood and Bone'

Image Via Nerdmuch.com

 

“I hate all fantasy. It’s all about swords and elves and fighting. Sometimes,” you say, like someone who has read two fantasy novels, tops, “they change it up and kiss each other.” The elves kiss the swords? If you insist. The point is that, chances are, you dislike a particular genre because of a few unpleasant encounters. Maybe you dislike the ‘classics’ because you’ve never gotten over your whitewashed high school curriculum (not that you need to get over it). Maybe your brain will liquefy if you see another poster for a YA dystopian blockbuster. Just try again.

 

5. Join your local library

 

"Having fun isn't hard, when you've got a library card!"

Image Via Tumblr.com

 

The cartoon aardvark Arthur said it best: “having fun isn’t hard—when you’ve got a library card.” Many people are surprisingly hesitant to take life advice from an early 2000s cartoon. If the advice is that a teenager can and should catch a murderer via trap-door and pulley system (Scooby Doo), that’s fair enough. This one’s solid, though. Even better, it’s completely free.

 

6. Find a BookTuber whose opinions you trust

Logo for Booktube, a subsection of YouTube content which covers books and authors

Image Via Bookwork.com

 

Here’s some news: YouTube isn’t just a place for pre-teens to make asinine comments. (It’s also for Vine compilations.) You may not be aware that the site has a thriving literary community, with many avid readers recording reviews, reactions, unboxings, and more. The obvious downside is that YouTube can be a bit of a popularity contest, and the top BookTubers to come up when you search might just have the highest-quality cameras or the most colorful bookshelves. Try searching for a review of a book you adore to find people reading the same things as you (regardless of the hits on the video). If you agree with that review, maybe you’ll agree with the others.

 

7. Try a memoir that speaks to you

 

Some of the best memoirs of 2018, including 'Educated' by Tara Westover and 'Sick' by Porochista Khakpour

Image Via Time.com

 

Maybe you assume most memoirs are too dramatic to resemble your life. They’re only for famous people, you think, or geniuses, orphans, criminals—people who are important, or tragic, or so often both at once. That’s a big assumption to make when life is the most dramatic possible thing, and you’re important already because you’re alive. Whether you relate to a writers’ cultural background, sexuality, profession, or even sense of humor, it’s powerful to feel a connection to another person—a person who, this time, is far from fictional. Many audiobook versions of memoirs are actually read by the author, which makes the experience all the more personal.

 

8. Learn something new

 

A selection of 2018's bestselling reads

Image Via Time.com

 

The difference between a work of non-fiction and your high school textbook is that the former is meant to be as fascinating as possible—while the latter is usually thick enough to inflict blunt-force trauma. Maybe you encountered a new topic on YouTube and want more information than a twenty-minute video can provide. True crime? Scientology? The Roman Empire? The real difference between a work of non-fiction and your high school textbook is that, with non-fiction, you can learn exactly what you want.

 

9. Pick a destination

 

An open book with a globe coming out of it

Image Via Abaa.org

Chances are, you’ve always wanted to go somewhere. (No, ‘to the refrigerator’ doesn’t count.) The destination doesn’t need to be far to be a destination—it only has to excite you. Or maybe you have an upcoming trip to somewhere a little less thrilling. (Off for the holidays to see your estranged aunt in rural Kansas, anyone?) It’s always possible that the sun over the fields will feel more beautiful once you’ve seen it through someone else’s eyes.

 

10. Develop a routine

 

A book, a fire, and a cup of whiskey

Image Via Craftybartender.com

 

In the ideal world, reading is a little more like this: you’re curled up by a fire with a mug of your preferred warm beverage (cocoa with marshmallows, Hot Toddy heavy on the whiskey), possibly in a sprawling library filled with plants you haven’t managed to kill yet. But you’re not in the ideal world—you’re in this one. Since it’s unlikely that you’ll ever have a day of uninterrupted, peaceful reading, it’s better to carve out thirty minutes to read and drink a cup of tea before you head off to bed.

 

Featured Image Via Goodhousekeeping.com