Tag: Ghost

Bookstr’s Three to Read Week Of 04/15/2020

Welcome back book lovers! We’ve had some locale changes and pandemic adjusting to do, but one thing remains a constant, and that’s Three to Read! I have three very exciting additions to your TBR this week, so let’s get into it!

Hot pick

and their children after them

by Nicolas Mathieu

IMAGE VIA AMAZON

Synopsis:

August 1992. One afternoon during a heatwave in a desolate valley somewhere in eastern France, with its dormant blast furnaces and its lake, fourteen-year-old Anthony and his cousin decide to steal a canoe to explore the famous nude beach across the water. The trip ultimately takes Anthony to his first love and a summer that will determine everything that happens afterward.

Nicolas Mathieu conjures up a valley, an era, and the political journey of a young generation that has to forge its own path in a dying world. Four summers and four defining moments, from “Smells Like Teen Spirit” to the 1998 World Cup, encapsulate the hectic lives of the inhabitants of a France far removed from the centers of globalization, torn between decency and rage.

And Their Children After Them

image via amazon

Why?

Nicolas Mathieu manages to capture the essence of coming-of-age throughout four hot summers. In a left-behind region in France, the feeling of stagnancy experienced by all rural teenagers is distinctly brought to life. The novel gives rural poverty a harsh spotlight, exposing its ills and effects on community. It will open your eyes to the strife of many, as well as exposing those distant memories of hazy, hot summers spent in fields, on beaches, and exploring yourself and the world around you.

 

Coffee Shop read

Indelicacy

by Amina Cain

Indelicacy: A Novel by [Amina Cain]

image via amazon

Synopsis:

A haunted feminist fable, Amina Cain’s Indelicacy is the story of a woman navigating between gender and class roles to empower herself and fulfill her dreams.

In “a strangely ageless world somewhere between Emily Dickinson and David Lynch” (Blake Butler), a cleaning woman at a museum of art nurtures aspirations to do more than simply dust the paintings around her. She dreams of having the liberty to explore them in writing, and so must find a way to win herself the time and security to use her mind. She escapes her lot by marrying a rich man, but having gained a husband, a house, high society, and a maid, she finds that her new life of privilege is no less constrained. Not only has she taken up different forms of time-consuming labor—social and erotic—but she is now, however passively, forcing other women to clean up after her. Perhaps another and more drastic solution is necessary?

Reminiscent of a lost Victorian classic in miniature, yet taking equal inspiration from such modern authors as Jean Rhys, Octavia Butler, Clarice Lispector, and Jean Genet, Amina Cain’s Indelicacy is at once a ghost story without a ghost, a fable without a moral, and a down-to-earth investigation of the barriers faced by women in both life and literature. It is a novel about seeing, class, desire, anxiety, pleasure, friendship, and the battle to find one’s true calling.

Why?

The structure of this novel is particularly interesting, with no set chapter or traditional format. This allows for an essence of individuality, and endows the novel with its own voice. You get from the narrative what you bring to your reading, with the novel’s core message of finding your own path in life ringing true for your appreciation, too.

This is a “ghostly feminist fable” that doesn’t have any particular ghost or moral.

Acutely observedIndelicacy is an exquisite jewel box of a novel with the passion and vitality found only in such rare and necessary works as The Hour of the Star and The Days of Abandonment. Through this timeless examination of solitude, art, and friendship, Amina Cain announces herself as one of the most intriguing writers of our time.” ―Patty Yumi Cottrell, author of Sorry to Disrupt the Peace.

 

dark horse

Advice i ignored: stories and wisdom from a depressed teen

by Ruby Walker

Advice I Ignored: Stories and Wisdom from a Formerly Depressed Teenager by [Ruby Walker]

image via amazon

Synopsis:

When Ruby Walker was fifteen, she went from a numb, silent, miserable high school dropout to a joyous loudmouth in one year flat. ADVICE I IGNORED answers the question everyone’s been asking her since: What happened?

In ten illustrated chapters, you’ll learn how to get out from under self-hatred, gain a sense of free will, create your way through an existential crisis, use exercise to beg your brain for endorphins, have an identity beyond “sad,” and more!

Full of embarrassing stories, honest advice, and fierce hope, ADVICE I IGNORED is a self-help book for people who hate help. And themselves.

 

Why?

If there is one thing we need right now, it’s positivity, and Ruby Walker is truly emblematic of this. Her book will help guide those who are suffering from depression through their struggle. Not only that, but her illustrations are gorgeous. This book will help you, move you, and amaze you. Coming from such a young voice, the book avoids being ‘preachy’ about mental health, because Ruby gets it! It’s worth bearing in mind that Walker is 18-years-old, and her book is a bona fide feat. Keep an eye out for Ruby on our upcoming 5×5, where she opens up about a particularly sensitive topic. For Ruby though, her sensitivity and honesty is what makes Advice I Ignored so great.

Featured Image via Bookstr

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5 Ghost Stories to Read on Christmas Eve

Though we might not readily associate ghost stories with Christmas Eve and winter celebrations, it was actually a very common practice to tell scary tales during the 19th century and even earlier on than that. For a number of reasons, some of which can be cited back to Puritan ancestry, this story telling tradition fell out of practice in America.

I, however, am a horror story buff, and I will look for any excuse to spin a scary yarn with friends and family.

 

Here are five ghost stories to read on Christmas Eve.

 

 

1. A Christmas Carol

 

image via Amazon

 

This is most definitely the longest ghost story on the list, but it definitely fits with the season. Charles Dicken’s A Christmas Carol is a culturally significant tale that has countless adaptations credited to it. This narrative follows Ebenezer Scrooge, an embittered old man who doesn’t just hate Christmas, but he just hates people in general. Yet out of everyone, he despises individuals who would dare to ask him for his time or, even worse, his money. He intends to spend Christmas Eve alone, as he does every year, but his plans are uprooted when the ghost of his former business partner comes to him and says that three more phantoms will be visiting him that night. Scrooge is forced to confront the ghosts of his past, and he is urged to change his ways. If he doesn’t, his actions won’t only result in ruining his life, it will also harm those directly impacted by his decisions.

 

 

2. The Turn of The screw

 

image via goodreads

 

Henry James‘s novella, The Turn of The Screw is an eerie tale that spans roughly seventy pages. The story begins with the narrator and his friends telling each other ghost stories one Christmas Eve, and the narrator claims that he is in possession of a one hundred percent real account of a haunting. What follows is the story of a governess who is hired to teach and care for two children. While her employment begins without incident, the governess soon begins to see strange, ghostly figures from a distance. She soon learns that these phantoms have sinister plans for the children, and she must do everything in her power to protect her two pupils.

 

3. The Kit Bag

 

image via literawiki

 

Written by Algernon Blackwood, The Kit Bag is a short story that follows Johnson, a lawyer’s secretary. Johnson is set to go on Christmas vacation after his boss wrapped up a case where he defended a man convicted of murder. He borrows a kit bag from his boss, but there is something very, very wrong with it. Johnson begins seeing images and hearing voices near the bag. This story is suspenseful and frightening, and it is definitely an excellent ghost story to read this winter.

 

 

4. The Canterville ghost

 

image via Alma books

 

This one is most definitely a breath of fresh air after the last two stories on this list. Oscar Wilde‘s The Canterville Ghost is a comedic story that plays with the tropes found in English ghost stories. This narrative follows an American family who moves to England and takes up residence in a haunted house. Try as the ghost may to frighten these new tenets, his efforts are in vain—the family just isn’t scared of rattling chains and random bloodstains. Unlike the previous two entries on this list, this story also has a happy ending. *Spoiler Alert*: This story begins as a playful ribbing of English ghost stories and ends with redemption for the ghost.

 

 

5. Oh, whistle, and i’ll come to you, my lad

 

image via pinterest

 

So many of the images for M.R. James‘s short story Oh, Whistle and I’ll Come to You, My Lad, are terrifying. This one is pretty tame by comparison to a few that I found. Professor Parkins, the story’s main character, goes on a golfing vacation. While on vacation, he comes across some old ruins and, and in these ruins, he finds a small whistle. Almost immediately after finding this item, Parkins begins to see a figure, have visions, and experience an oppressive energy. This all culminates in the final chilling encounter, where the figure that Parkins has been seeing in the distance appears in his bedroom.

 

Featured Image Via Den of Geek

 

 


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Here’s A New Look At Demi Moore’s Memoir ‘Inside Out’

The life of actress Demi Moore perfectly captures the ups-and-downs of being a leading lady in Hollywood. Despite the extensive media coverage surrounding Moore’s multiple marriages and lengthy hiatus from filmmaking, there is still much about the actress that people don’t know. Now, Moore is ready to bare it all in her new memoir.

 

Image Via Amazon

 

Inside Out sees Moore reflecting on her troubled childhood and the choices she made that led her to where she is now. Moore goes in-depth into her strained relationship with her mother, who attempted suicide when she was 12. The most shocking revelation in this section is that Moore was raped when she was 15, which caused her to move out of her mother’s house at 16. This is where Moore began to pursue a career in acting, which lead to a breakout role on General Hospital that blossomed into a successful film career.

 

Demi Moore

Image Via People

 

In an interview with The New York Times, Moore said that talking about these traumatic events gave more a new sense of vulnerability that she had never experienced before:

 

“It’s exciting, and yet I feel very vulnerable. There is no cover of a character. It’s not somebody else’s interpretation of me.”

 

 

Moore is well-known for starring in several box-office successes in the 80’s and 90’s such as About Last Night, Indecent Proposal, Ghost, and A Few Good Men, but her career stalled after a string of flops. Her marriages to both Bruce Willis and Ashton Kutcher were the subject of intense media scrutiny, and the high salaries that she received for her work led to public shaming by many.

 

But Moore has nothing to apologize for. In an interview with GMA, Moore is proud of her accomplishments:

 

“Why shouldn’t I? Why shouldn’t all women be paid equal to the quality of the work they’re doing? Just treat me the same. No better, no worse.”

 

 

Inside Out is available now.

 

 

Featured Image Via Yahoo

Six Galaxy Brain Tweets from SparkNotes

If you’re anything like me, SparkNotes has always been there when you need it. Now, they’re not only helping you pass your classes, but also serving you the spiciest of literature memes. They’re all pure gold, but here are just a few.

 

 

Theseus or not, YOU. ARE. VALID.

 

 

Unfortunately there’s no third option, so if you want to set the Minotaur up on a blind date with your friend, you’re kind of out of luck. Otherwise, you’re good though. What color do your sails need to be if you didn’t slay the Minotaur but you’re seeing it this Friday?

 

 

 

Some people appreciate attitude

 

 

I mean, he’s already in love with her by that point, but you get the idea. He’s always talking about how mean she is, and then boom, marry me! Of course, the same could be said of her. What a stressful ship. Still though, you know, I’m on it.

 

 

 

Want to delay your problems forever?

 

 

Curiosity may not have killed the cat, but it sure killed Dorian Gray. Still, he lived a while looking fresh and evil in stead of old and evil, so if you’ve got the attic space, why not? In this economy though? The thing’s going under the bed.

 

 

 

Do You haunt an old building? Then you need…

 

 

 

Sure, you might not be the most conventionally attractive, but your secret underground hideaway is second to none, and isn’t it what’s on the inside that matters? What’s under the surface? (What’s directly  under the opera house?)

 

 

 

People can’t know we sit! And… murder!

 

 

Maybe not as relatable as the original video, but definitely a strong mood, and just as futile. The body stays right under the floorboards after all. If only there’d been seashells on the doorknobs, maybe things would have gone better.

 

 

 

Hindsight is… Ah man I botched it.

 

 

Don’t look back in anger (or at all). Going to the depths of hell is a nice gesture, and who doesn’t like musicians, but you’ve gotta stick the landing by actually fulfilling the deal. Just one opinion, but if both of you don’t come back alive, that’s a bad date.

 

 

 

All images via SparkNotes

Demi Moore for ‘Brave New World’ TV Adaptation!

Golden Globes, Game of Thrones, and Downton Abbey are all heading to the same place:  Brave New World.

 

Demi Moore

Image Via Nicki Swift.com

Not kidding.

 

 

The Jakarta Post reports that Demi Moore, two time Golden Globe nominee for Ghost and If These Walls Could Talk and whose had a role in classics like The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me, and A Few Good Men, will be playing Linda in the upcoming TV adaptation of  Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World.

 

Harry Lloyd

Image Via TVLine

Coming along for the ride is Harry Loyd, knowing for his roles as Viserys in Game of Thrones, Peter Quayle in Counterpart, and Brian in Theory of Everything. He’ll be playing Bernard Marx.

 

Jessica Brown

Image Via The Telegraph

Completing the novel’s super duo is Jessica Brown—Downton Abbey‘s Lady Sybil Crawley, Albatross‘ Emelia Conan Doyle, and Harlots‘ Charlotte Wells—who will play Lenina Crowe.

For those unaware of the story, Bernard Marx and Lenina Crowe, two New Worlders, journey to the Savage Lands where they meet John the Savage, a man raised outside the confines of their society, and his mother Linda.

As for the rest, well, you’ll have to read the book!

 

Alden Ehrenreich

Image Via Entertainment Weekly

Alden Ehrenreich of Solo: A Star Wars Story, is already cast as John the Savage.

 

David Weiner

Image Via IMDB

Behind the scenes we have David Wiener, a writer on Amazon’s Homecoming, as series showrunner and executive producer.

 

Owen Harris

Image Via IMDB

Owen Harris, who directed Black Mirror season three episode San Junipero and season five episode Striking Vipers, will direct the first two episodes and also executive produce the series.

 

Grant Morrison and Brian Taylor

Image Via Variety

Comic book legend Grant Morrison and Brian Taylor, who worked to bring us the outstanding series Happy! to the small screen are also executive producing.

 

Amblin Television

Image Via Logopedia – Fandom

The final two executive producers are Amblin Television co-presidents Darryl Frank and Justin Falvey.

 

Aldous Huxley

Image Via The New Yorker

Looks like the adaptation is in good hands! Any thoughts Huxley?

“There are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors of perception.”

Cool!

 

 

Featured Image Via Everyman Theatre