Tag: GeorgeOrwell

The Handmaid's Tale

13 Quotes from Dystopian Novels to Get You Fired Up

For as long as we have been granted freedoms, there have been people fighting to take those freedoms away; this is the most human of cycles. There has never been (and will likely never be, at least not right now) a time when people haven’t had to stand up against the systemic and societal oppression they’ve been forced to deal with everyday.

 

We’ve been warned about what can happen when we allow ourselves to stop caring about the state of the world and the other people inhabiting it by authors since the beginning of time; the entire dystopian genre is centered around it. So, don’t allow yourself to grow sedentary but also don’t grow too fearful; for as many greedy, selfish, oppressive, bad figureheads there are in existence, there are way, way more of us who really do care and move with empathy while fighting for a world of genuine equality.

 

So, take a look at these thirteen quotes from dystopian novels and give yourself that extra push you may need to keep marching forward! 

 

“We were the people who were not in the papers. We lived in the blank white spaces at the edges of print. It gave us more freedom. We lived in the gaps between the stories.”  Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale

 


 

“Every faction conditions it’s members to think and act a certain way. And most people do it. For most people, it’s not hard to learn, to find a pattern of thought that works and stay that way. But our minds move in a dozen different directions. We can’t be confined to one way of thinking, and that terrifies our leaders. It means we can’t be controlled. And it means that, no matter what they do, we will always cause trouble for them.” Veronica Roth, Divergent

 


 

“Did you ever feel, as though you had something inside you that was only waiting for you to give it a chance to come out? Some sort of extra power that you aren’t using – you know, like all the water that goes down the falls instead of through the turbines?” Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 


 

“If liberty means anything at all it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.” George Orwell, 1984

 


 

“There must be something in books, something we can’t imagine, to make a woman stay in a burning house; there must be something there. You don’t stay for nothing.” Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

 


 

“We can destroy what we have written, but we cannot unwrite it.” Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange

 


 

“Of course they needed to care. It was the meaning of everything.” Lois Lowry, The Giver

 


 

“That was when they suspended the Constitution. They said it would be temporary. There wasn’t even any rioting in the streets. People stayed home at night, watching television, looking for some direction. There wasn’t even an enemy you could put your finger on.” Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale

 


 

“Our lives are not our own. We are bound to others, past and present, and by each crime and every kindness, we birth our future.” David Mitchell, Cloud Atlas

 


 

“Tell freedom I said hello.” Lauren DeStefano, Wither

 


 

“But you can’t make people listen. They have to come round in their own time, wondering what happened and why the world blew up around them. It can’t last.” Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

 


 

“Do not let your fire go out, spark by irreplaceable spark in the hopeless swamps of the not-quite, the not-yet, and the not-at-all. Do not let the hero in your soul perish in lonely frustration for the life you deserved and have never been able to reach. The world you desire can be won. It exists.. it is real.. it is possible.. it’s yours.” Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

 


“I may be the last one, but I am the one still standing. I am the one turning to face the faceless hunter in the woods on an abandoned highway. I am the one not running, not staying, but facing. Because if I am the last one, then I am humanity. And if this is humanity’s last war, then I am the battlefield.” Rick Yancey, The 5th Wave

 

 

 

via GIPHY

 

 

 

Featured Image via Romper

ks

10 Famous Authors Who Were Born in June

It’s finally June; the first month where it really starts to feel like summer! Now is the perfect time to grab your favorite book, pop on over to the nearest park, take root under a tree, and read while you soak up the sun.

 

And, what better way to celebrate the month of June than with the works of an author born this very month? Let’s say happy birthday to these ten Geminis and Cancers!

 

 

Thomas Hardy (June 2, 1840)

 

Thomas Hardy

via Famous People

 

Time changes everything except something within us which is always surprised by change.

 

 

Allen Ginsberg (June 3, 1926)

 

Allen Ginsberg

via My Jewish Learning

 

Follow your inner moonlight; don’t hide the madness.

 

 

Nikki Giovanni (June 7, 1943)

 

Nikki Giovanni

via NBC4

 

There is always something to do. There are hungry people to feed, naked people to clothe, sick people to comfort and make well. And while I don’t expect you to save the world I do think it’s not asking too much for you to love those with whom you sleep, share the happiness of those whom you call friend, engage those among you who are visionary and remove from your life those who offer you depression, despair and disrespect.

 

Maurice Sendak (June 10, 1928)

 

Maurice Sendak

via Newsweek

 

Why my needle is stuck in childhood, I don’t know. I guess that’s where my heart is.

 

Anne Frank (June 12, 1929)

 

Anne Frank

via innomag

How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.

 

William Butler Yeats (June 13, 1865)

 

Yeats

via Wikimedia Commons

Education is not the filling of a pail, but rather the lighting of a fire.

 

Joyce Carol Oates (June 16, 1938)

 

Joyce Carol Oates

via Lafayette Library and Learning Center

 

We are linked by blood, and blood is memory without language.

 

Octavia E. Butler (June 22, 1947)

 

Octavia E. Butler

via CNN

 

I just knew there were stories I wanted to tell.

 

George Orwell (June 25, 1903)

 

George Orwell

via Countercurrents

 

The Revolution will be complete when the language is perfect.

 

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (June 28, 1712)

 

Jean-Jacques Rousseau

via Wikipedia

 

Man is born free and everywhere he is in chains.

 

 

 

Featured Image via Tumblr

George Orwell

10 George Orwell Quotes That’ll Make You Question Everything

It was a bright day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.

 

When George Orwell published his iconic novel 1984, also known as Nineteen Eighty-Four, he used that opening line to invite readers to question everything. Question the existence of life. Question the gaze put upon them at any waking moment. Question the normalcy of a potentially fictional reality. Orwell’s dystopian novel blurred the lines between fiction and reality.

 

A cultural phenomenon since its release in 1949, the cultural impact and relevance of 1984 has only grown as time’s gone on. In the wake of recent political upheaval and social turmoil occurring around the globe, particularly in the United States, the novel has become a best-seller once again. These quotes will show you why. Here are 10 Orwell quotes from 1984 that will have you questioning everything.

 

orwell

Image courtesy of ‘Lesley Barnes’

 

1. “Perhaps a lunatic was simply a minority of one.”

 

2. “Reality exists in the human mind, and nowhere else.”

 

3. “But if thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought.”

 

4. “Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past.”

 

5. “Until they became conscious they will never rebel, and until after they have rebelled they cannot become conscious.”
 

 

orwell

Image Courtesy of ‘Wake Up World’

 

6. “Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.”

 

7. “The masses never revolt of their own accord, and they never revolt merely because they are oppressed. Indeed, so long as they are not permitted to have standards of comparison, they never even become aware that they are oppressed.”

 

8. “Being in a minority, even in a minority of one, did not make you mad. There was truth and there was untruth, and if you clung to the truth even against the whole world, you were not mad.”

 

9. “We know that no one ever seizes power with the intention of relinquishing it.”

 

10. “Big Brother is Watching You.”

 

via GIPHY

 

Feature Image Courtesy of ‘Her Campus’.

Guy writing in journal

I’ve Never Read These Books But Here’s What I’m Guessing They’re About

For a lot of people, their reading careers begin and end in high school. The works of F. Scott Fitzgerald, George Orwell, William Shakespeare, and a bunch of other white guys are piled on them until they believe there’s no other type of literature besides the kind that are allegedly well-written and conclusively boring.

 

But sometimes these books (a.k.a. literary canon) slip on by. There are a number of books it seems like everybody who graduated from high school besides me read. But I’ve heard about them through the grapevine, rumors and hearsay. I don’t plan on reading these books at this point because I’m pretty sure I know exactly what they’re about. Here are a few books I’ve heard so much about I think I probably know their stories.

 

1. Animal Farm by George Orwell

 

Animal Farm

Image Via Amazon

 

George Orwell’s classic has been read by high schoolers worldwide, and I’ve been told it has something to do with communism. Going off the title and what I know about communism, here’s what I think this book is about:

 

A bunch of animals live on a farm. They’re probably farm animals. I would guess pigs, chickens, and maybe some cows. Since it has something to do with communism, I’d say the animals have to share what they produce. So this book probably follows a hen who lays some eggs. A cow makes a bunch of milk. The hen takes some of the cow’s milk, and the cow takes some of the hen’s eggs. They then realize they want back what they respectively produced, but the farmer gets involved, things go awry, and a revolution happens. The book ends with the animals making an omelette that includes all of the farm’s produce.

 

2. 1984 by George Orwell

 

1984

Image Via Amazon

 

Here’s another Orwellian classic sixteen-year-old me was not provided with. As far as I know, Orwell skipped farm animals this time around and went after the 1980s. Also, I know Big Brother is involved. Here’s what I’m guessing 1984 is about:

 

This high schooler living in 1984 just wants a new Stratocaster like his hero, Eddie Van Halen. But, just as he saves up enough money to buy a new axe, Big Brother (i.e. his older brother) spies on him and finds where he’s hidden his savings. Big Brother then takes the high schooler’s money and uses it to update his wardrobe to impress a girl. The little brother then takes it upon himself to ruin Big Brother’s first date with this dream girl, which happens at the junior prom. It’s like a John Hughes movie set when? In 1984, of course.

 

3. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

 

Slaughterhouse-Five

Image Via Amazon

 

I’ve read The Sirens of Titan so I’m not as lost with Vonnegut as I am with Orwell. But, still, the plot of Slaughterhouse-Five has been delivered to me secondhand, and probably by people who only read half the book. Here’s what I think it’s about:

 

In a world where time travel exists, a man named Billy Pilgrim is a butcher on the run. He’s on the run from ravenous alien hunters who hunt people named Billy. As a cosmic butcher, Billy’s only hope is to travel between the galactic hubs called slaughterhouses. He goes from slaughterhouses one to four searching for safety from his alien hunters, but to no avail. His only hope is to try Slaughterhouse-Five, which nobody’s heard from in several thousand years. What will Billy Pilgrim find at the final cosmic slaughterhouse?

 

4. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

 

The Old Man and the sea

Image Via Amazon

 

I once did a presentation on Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro,” so you can say I’m something of a Hemingway expert. Also, I saw Midnight in Paris (not bragging). I get the impression the title explains quite a bit of the plot, so, in the sparse style of Hemingway, here’s my impression of this book’s plot:

 

An old man goes fishing. Also, he drinks a lot. Probably says something misogynistic.

 

5. The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien

 

The Things They Carried

Image Via Amazon

 

This one I’ve heard has to do with Vietnam and it’s quite touching. It’s either a very understated, dramatic title or one O’Brien came up with right before he sent the manuscript to his editor. Here’s the plot:

 

Set during the Vietnam War, a battalion of American soldiers are stuck in Vietnam, all communication cut off from base camp. They’re deep in enemy territory. Each soldier has a distinct personality and something back in America they have to get back to. Also, they each carry something, such as backpacks, guns, and canteens. But, it becomes clear as the stakes rise, that the heaviest things these soldiers carry are not on their backs…but in their minds.

 

Feature Photo by Sticker Mule on Unsplash

Guy writing in journal

I've Never Read These Books But Here's What I'm Guessing They're About

For a lot of people, their reading careers begin and end in high school. The works of F. Scott Fitzgerald, George Orwell, William Shakespeare, and a bunch of other white guys are piled on them until they believe there’s no other type of literature besides the kind that are allegedly well-written and conclusively boring.

 

But sometimes these books (a.k.a. literary canon) slip on by. There are a number of books it seems like everybody who graduated from high school besides me read. But I’ve heard about them through the grapevine, rumors and hearsay. I don’t plan on reading these books at this point because I’m pretty sure I know exactly what they’re about. Here are a few books I’ve heard so much about I think I probably know their stories.

 

1. Animal Farm by George Orwell

 

Animal Farm

Image Via Amazon

 

George Orwell’s classic has been read by high schoolers worldwide, and I’ve been told it has something to do with communism. Going off the title and what I know about communism, here’s what I think this book is about:

 

A bunch of animals live on a farm. They’re probably farm animals. I would guess pigs, chickens, and maybe some cows. Since it has something to do with communism, I’d say the animals have to share what they produce. So this book probably follows a hen who lays some eggs. A cow makes a bunch of milk. The hen takes some of the cow’s milk, and the cow takes some of the hen’s eggs. They then realize they want back what they respectively produced, but the farmer gets involved, things go awry, and a revolution happens. The book ends with the animals making an omelette that includes all of the farm’s produce.

 

2. 1984 by George Orwell

 

1984

Image Via Amazon

 

Here’s another Orwellian classic sixteen-year-old me was not provided with. As far as I know, Orwell skipped farm animals this time around and went after the 1980s. Also, I know Big Brother is involved. Here’s what I’m guessing 1984 is about:

 

This high schooler living in 1984 just wants a new Stratocaster like his hero, Eddie Van Halen. But, just as he saves up enough money to buy a new axe, Big Brother (i.e. his older brother) spies on him and finds where he’s hidden his savings. Big Brother then takes the high schooler’s money and uses it to update his wardrobe to impress a girl. The little brother then takes it upon himself to ruin Big Brother’s first date with this dream girl, which happens at the junior prom. It’s like a John Hughes movie set when? In 1984, of course.

 

3. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

 

Slaughterhouse-Five

Image Via Amazon

 

I’ve read The Sirens of Titan so I’m not as lost with Vonnegut as I am with Orwell. But, still, the plot of Slaughterhouse-Five has been delivered to me secondhand, and probably by people who only read half the book. Here’s what I think it’s about:

 

In a world where time travel exists, a man named Billy Pilgrim is a butcher on the run. He’s on the run from ravenous alien hunters who hunt people named Billy. As a cosmic butcher, Billy’s only hope is to travel between the galactic hubs called slaughterhouses. He goes from slaughterhouses one to four searching for safety from his alien hunters, but to no avail. His only hope is to try Slaughterhouse-Five, which nobody’s heard from in several thousand years. What will Billy Pilgrim find at the final cosmic slaughterhouse?

 

4. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

 

The Old Man and the sea

Image Via Amazon

 

I once did a presentation on Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro,” so you can say I’m something of a Hemingway expert. Also, I saw Midnight in Paris (not bragging). I get the impression the title explains quite a bit of the plot, so, in the sparse style of Hemingway, here’s my impression of this book’s plot:

 

An old man goes fishing. Also, he drinks a lot. Probably says something misogynistic.

 

5. The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien

 

The Things They Carried

Image Via Amazon

 

This one I’ve heard has to do with Vietnam and it’s quite touching. It’s either a very understated, dramatic title or one O’Brien came up with right before he sent the manuscript to his editor. Here’s the plot:

 

Set during the Vietnam War, a battalion of American soldiers are stuck in Vietnam, all communication cut off from base camp. They’re deep in enemy territory. Each soldier has a distinct personality and something back in America they have to get back to. Also, they each carry something, such as backpacks, guns, and canteens. But, it becomes clear as the stakes rise, that the heaviest things these soldiers carry are not on their backs…but in their minds.

 

Feature Photo by Sticker Mule on Unsplash