Tag: film adaptations

Michael B. Jordan to Adapt Marlon James’ ‘Black Leopard, Red Wolf’

The star of Creed 2 and Black Panther is bringing a recently published novel to the big screen.

 

Michael B. Jordan and Warner Bros. recently acquired the film rights to Marlon James’ fantasy novel Black Leopard, Red Wolf, which was published on February 5th.

 

The first in a planned series called the Dark Star trilogy, set against the backdrop of two warring kingdoms in an epic fantasy world, the novel follows a hunter named Tracker who has been hired to find a missing child. The story draws heavily from African history and mythology, with James jokingly describing the novel as an “African ‘Game of Thrones’”.

 

Image Via Amazon

 

Jordan will produce the film under his Outlier Society production label, which he founded in order to bring more diverse stories to the big screen.

James is also known for his novel A Brief History Of Seven Killings, which is being adapted into a series by Amazon.

 

 

Featured Image Via TheVerge

The Nominations For The 91st Academy Awards Have Been Announced and Book Adaptations Take the Lead!

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences just released the nominations for this year’s Academy Awards, and book and graphic novel adaptations received their fair share of nominations.

 

Here are the literary adaptations that were nominated:

 

1. Black Panther – 7 nominations including Best Picture

 

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Image Via The Wrap

 

One of the highest-grossing and most popular films of 2018, this Marvel Comics film has become the first comic book adaptation to be nominated for Best Picture. It was also nominated for Best Original Score, Best Original Song, Best Sound Editing, Best Sound Mixing, Best Production Design and Best Costume Design.

 

2. BlacKkKlansman – 6 nominations including Best Picture

 

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Image Via The New York Times

 

Spike Lee’s latest “joint” is based on the memoir by Ron Stallworth, and tells the story about how he became the first black police officer in the Colorado Springs Police Department and used his position to infiltrate the Ku Klux Klan. This is the first time Spike Lee has ever been nominated for Best Director. The film was also nominated for Best Supporting Actor for Adam Driver, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Original Score and Best Film Editing.

 

3. Mary Poppins Returns – 4 nominations

 

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Image Via The Hollywood Reporter

 

P.L. Travers’ timeless classic was remade last year with Emily Blunt filling in for Julie Andrews as the title role. The musical received four nominations for Best Original Score, Best Original Song, Best Production Design and Best Costume Design.

 

4. First Man – 4 nominations

 

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Image Via Variety

 

This biopic about Neil Armstrong and the Apollo 11 mission to the moon is based on the biography First Man: The Life of Neil Armstrong by James R. Hansen. The film is up for Best Sound Editing, Best Sound Mixing, Best Production Design and Best Visual Effects.

 

5. Can You Ever Forgive Me – 3 nominations

 

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Image Via The Atlantic

 

Melissa McCarthy earned her second Oscar nomination for this biopic based on the memoir of the same name by Lee Israel, which follows her life as she begins to make money forging letters from deceased actors and playwrights. The film was also nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay and co-star Richard E. Grant was nominated for Best Supporting Actor.

 

6. If Beale Street Could Talk – 3 nominations

 

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Image Via Slate

 

Based on the James Baldwin novel of the same name, this drama film from the director of Moonlight follows a couple struggling to stay together when the man is falsely accused of a crime. It was nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Original Score, but Regina King’s performance as the mother of the accused has garnered the most attention and she is now the frontrunner for Best Supporting Actress.

 

7. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs – 3 nominations

 

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Image Via The Hollywood Reporter

 

This Netflix film from the Coen Brothers isn’t actually based on a novel, but rather on a series of short stories that the brothers wrote but never published. An anthology of six different Western stories, the film was nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Costume Design and Best Original Song.

 

8. Mary Queen of Scots – 2 nominations

 

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Image Via Daily Express

 

Saoirse Ronan is the star of this biopic based on the biography Queen of Scots: The True Life of Mary Stuart written by John Guy. Though it missed out on Best Picture, the film will be competing for Best Costume Design and Best Makeup and Hairstyling.

 

9. Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse – 1 nomination for Best Animated Feature

 

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Image Via Rolling Stone

 

A new take on the classic Marvel Comics character, this animated superhero film tells the origin story of Miles Morales as he interacts with an older Peter Parker and a number of other “Spider-People” from various dimensions. This film has emerged as the frontrunner for Best Animated Feature

 

10. Border – 1 nomination for Best Makeup and Hairstyling

 

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Image Via Variety

 

This Swedish fantasy film about a customs officer with an unusual sense of smell was selected as Sweden’s entry for Best Foreign Language Film. While it wasn’t nominated in that category, it did receive one nomination for Best Makeup and Hairstyling. The film is based on a short story of the same name by John Ajvide Lindqvist. The story can be found in his collection Let The Old Dreams Die.

 

11. The Wife – 1 nomination for Best Actress

 

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Image Via Variety

 

Glenn Close is the frontrunner to win the Best Actress award for her role in The Wife, about a woman who confronts the sacrifices she has made in her life when her husband receives a literary award. The film is based on the novel of the same name by Meg Wolitzer. Catch our interview with Meg Wolitzer below!

 

 

12. Avengers: Infinity War – 1 nomination for Best Visual Effects

 

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Image Via Polygon

 

The biggest Marvel Comics movie yet was only able to secure one nomination, but it seems fitting that it would be for Best Visual Effects.

 

13. Christopher Robin – 1 nomination for Best Visual Effects

 

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Image Via Hollywood Reporter

 

This new take on A.A. Milne’s classic characters takes them into the real world so they can help a grown-up Christopher Robin find his sense of imagination again. The CGI-versions of Pooh and his friends were nominated for Best Visual Effects.

 

14. Ready Player One – 1 nomination for Best Visual Effects

 

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Image Via CLTure

 

Steven Spielberg’s latest adventure film, which takes place almost entirely inside a video game, is based on Ernest Cline’s novel of the same name and was nominated for Best Visual Effects.

 

 

Which adaptation do you hope wins?

 

 

Featured Image Via Awards Daily

The Birds

5 Terrifying Movies Based on Even Scarier Short Stories

Can a short story really be scary enough to inspire two hours of terror? The answer is a resounding YES. These short stories might be small in size, but they’ve made it to the big screen. From the earliest days of silent film up into the present, here are five full-length horror movies inspired by famously spooky short stories.

 

1. The Avenging Conscience (1914)

 

Still from D.W. Griffith's film 'The Avenging Conscience'

Image via youtube.com

 

This early silent horror film draws inspiration from Edgar Allen Poe‘s famous short story, “The Tell-Tale Heart.” In the film, a young man in love plots the murder of an uncle who stands in the way of his would-be marriage. As in Poe’s story, the guilt comes with some nasty side effects… mysterious noises, strange apparitions… but are these just the unfortunate dreams of a troubled conscience, or is something else really going on?

 

2. The Body Snatcher (1945)

 

Original poster for Robert Wise's 'The Body Snatcher'

Image via poster-rama.com

 

Robert Wise’s film, famously starring cultural icon Bela Lugosi, shares its name with its source of inspiration: Robert Louis Stevenson‘s The Body Snatcher. Stevenson authored many prolific works that brought him fame in his lifetime, including Treasure Island and Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.  And while Stevenson’s story inspired director Wise, real events inspired Stevenson.  The true source material of “The Body Snatcher” is the gruesome tale of murderous surgeon Robert Knox. Until the Anatomy Act of 1832, the only bodies permitted for scientific research were those of criminals the courts condemned to death and dissection. It was common to snatch bodies of the recently deceased (from houses or graves!) in order to keep up a fresh supply of corpses. Knox took it a step further, hiring thugs to murder the homeless and wayward drunks. If you want something done right, you have to do it yourself…?

 

3. The Birds (1963)

 

Still from Alfred Hitchcock's 'The Birds'

Image via moma.org

 

The name The Birds is immediately identifiable as a Hitchcock film, one of the most classic and widely-known thrillers. Fewer people know the film draws upon a horror novelette of the same name: “The Birds” by Daphne du Maurier, which first appeared in her 1952 collection The Apple TreeA British writer, du Maurier wrote this story as a metaphor for the Blitz, the infamous and devastating air raids over England during World War II. Though the film counterpart is set in America and lacks the same meaning, Hitchcock’s film is still culturally significant with its preservation in the National Film Registry.

 

4. Children of the Corn (1984)

 

VHS jacket cover of 'Children of the Corn'

Image via wallpapertag.com

 

This cult classic horror film is notable as perhaps the best of many film adaptations of Stephen King‘s short stories. Other King short story adaptations include “1408,” “Apt Pupil,” “The Boogeyman,” “The Mist,” “Graveyard Shift,” and many, MANY more— not to mention adaptations of his full-length novels. (You can read the best of King’s short stories here.) A large number of King’s film adaptations are faithful to the original. In this case, both the film and the short story depict a cult of children living in a cornfield in Nebraska, murdering anyone over the age of eighteen at the order of their sinister deity.

 

5. The Tournament (2009)

 

Ian Somerhalder in 'The Tournament'

Image via collider.com

 

This indie British film, starring Lost and The Vampire Diaries‘ Ian Somerhalder, takes inspiration from classic short story “The Most Dangerous Game” by Richard Connell. A source of fear and delight for students across the world, Connell’s 1932 story describes a castaway’s chilling fight for survival as an unhinged aristocrat hunts him for sport. The film adaptation reinterprets this struggle as a televised competition between wealthy human-hunters. While The Tournament itself didn’t achieve much box office success, it’s notable as one of nearly twenty film adaptations of this dark and thrilling story. It’s also made its way into TV pop culture, inspiring episodes of hit shows Supernatural and Law and Order: SVU.

 

 

Featured Image Via Popsugar

Viggo Mortenson

Viggo Mortensen Almost Died During the Filming of ‘Return of the King’

Most people know that filming for the Lord of the Rings franchise took place in New Zealand, widely known for its pristine natural landscape that seems almost closer to fantasy than reality. People even pay for Lord of the Rings tourism to see for themselves. So yes… everyone knows about the mountains. Fewer people know about the un-detonated explosives. Viggo Mortensen definitely didn’t when he rode his horse straight into them.-

 

Viggo Mortensen on horseback

Image via Vulture.com

 

The Return of the King definitely has its life-and-death moments, but one of them was a lot realer than anyone would have liked. Shooting for Aragon’s impassioned speech outside the Black Gates of Mordor took place in the Rangipo desert… where New Zealand had once conducted military training. Since the area was riddled with un-detonated explosives, directors established a ‘safe location’ away from the bombs. Sounds safe, right? It was— until an improvising Mortensen rode into the minefield during the famous scene.

 

Watch it again for extra stress (as if you needed more).

 

 

Director Peter Jackson, apparently, thought for sure that Mortensen would die. Ian Nathan writes in his upcoming book Anything You Can Imagine: Peter Jackson and the Making of Middle Earth: “Having found their perfect Aragorn, they were going to watch him get blown up by an unexploded New Zealand bomb.”

 

 

Featured image via maxim.com

books 4 life

Check Out These 5 Confirmed Film Adaptations For YA Series

In 2018 alone, we have around 32 film adaptations either made and released or still being made to release later this year. More and more authors are opting to bring their works to the silver screen and the popular trend does not seem to be stopping anytime soon. So, without further delay, here are five new confirmations of film adaptations from young adult authors.

 

 

1. Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds

 

 

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Image Via Amazon

 

 

Reynolds’ work is both parts unique as it is inspiring. Instead of choosing to write a traditional story, Long Way Down is set in the time of a teenager’s elevator ride. The main character at first only has revenge on his mind, but the narratives of several others offer up a vital and expansive look on the cycle of violence.

 

 

The project has been optioned by Universal Studios. Michael De Luca and John Legend are on set to produce the adaptation to Long Way Down.

 

 

 

2. Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi

 

 

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Image Via Allthesebrokenhearts – WordPress.com

 

 

In Shatter Me, our protagonist is a seventeen year old girl named Juliet living in a dystopian world. She is afflicted with somewhat of a curse known as the “fatal touch”; whenever someone touches her, they instantly die. Our hero is sent to prison after an accidental murder, but her peril doesn’t end there.

 

 

Tahereh Mafi has agreed to develop Shatter Me with ABC Signature Studios. Updates and news regarding the new television adaptation can be found on the author’s social media.

 

 

 

3. The Sandcastle Empire by Kayla Olson

 

 

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Image Via Amazon

 

 

Olson’s story is set in a world that has been afflicted with the misfortunes associated with radical climate change. Resources are scarce and society is ruled by a ruthless upper class named The Wolf Pack. Our heroine, Eden, decides to leave her home due to the criminal ways of The Wolf Pack, and discovers the mysterious and eerie Sanctuary Island. 

 

 

It was announced before back in 2016 that Leonardo DiCaprio would be producing The Sandcastle Empire alongside his business partner Jennifer Davisson. Paramount Pictures is on-board for distribution.

 

 

 

4. Cursed by Tom Wheeler

 

 

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Image Via GeekTyrant

 

 

Written by Tom Wheeler and illustrated by Frank Miller, Cursed looks to be an interesting project. This is because the adaptation is being worked on while the actual book hasn’t even been released yet. Cursed is planned to release some time in fall 2019 in book form while the adaptation will come not long after that.

 

 

Wheeler and Miller take us on an adventure set in Arthurian Legend. Our heroine this time is a young teenager named Nimue and she is to become the famous Lady of the Lake from the tales of Prince Arthur

 

 

5. Red Rising by Pierce Brown

 

 

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Image Via Subterranean Press

 

 

In Red Rising, author Pierce Brown takes us to a futuristic version of a society on Mars. Different social classes are color coded, with red being the lowest standing. Darrow is our protagonist, and also a member of the red caste. Equal to slaves, the red caste is forced to work on the planet and told to do so in order to make it inhabitable for future generations. However, Darrow begins to find out that Mars has sustained life for longer than he has been lead to know.

 

 

Previously, Universal Studios was said to be adapting Brown’s book. However, the author has since stated that he is reaching out to several streaming services to make a series and that he is also working with an undisclosed director. We don’t know for sure when we will get to see the film yet, but we can be sure to hear more in the near future.

 

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Slashfilm