Tag: film adaptation

The Artemis Fowl Film Adaptation is Way Off the Mark

How do you feel about a childhood book series being totally changed in a movie adaptation? The new Artemis Fowl movie being released by Disney this year is changing its main character, 12 year-old Artemis, into a good guy, instead the villain he famously was in the book series.

 

image via my kids timer

“Artemis Fowl” had been compared to “Harry Potter” in the past, but this comparison didn’t sit well with the author of the series, Eoin Colfer.  His response was that Artemis is an anti-Harry Potter figure, someone who robs and kidnaps and is largely unbothered by remorse.

 

In the first book, Artemis’s father, Artemis Fowl I, goes missing, and his mother goes mad with grief.  Artemis and Butler, someone he relies on for protection, discover a portal to the fairy underworld, and Artemis kidnaps a fairy and holds her for ransom in order to fund his search for his father.  The fairies fight against Artemis for doing this, and he has to fight back against their powers.

 

 

The trailer above opens with a dwarf named Mulch Diggums being investigated by a mysterious voice. The mysterious voice asks Mulch about the man he works for, to which Mulch replies, “This isn’t the father; it’s about the son,” grinning all the while.  We then see Artemis Fowl I praising Artemis Fowl II for his growth in strength and intelligence surpassing his expectations.

 

When Artemis senior disappears, Artemis junior receives a phone call that his father stole something important from an unknown group, and that he should return it or face consequences.  Butler then has no choice but to reveal Artemis senior’s underground lab to Artemis junior, stating that he has protected the world from secrets that could destroy Earth.

In the quest to find his father, Artemis partners with Mulch Diggums as well as a LEP elven reconnaissance officer named Holly Short.  There are then scenes of action-packed fighting against an otherworldly army.

image via football 365

The problem with this movie, according to hardcore fans of the book, is that it’s a far departure from the “evil genius” character that is seen in the books.  The above Nerdist article links some of people’s opinions on the upcoming movie (I featured two I liked).

 

 

As you can see, some people are just… not happy. Their reasoning isn’t far off, though. The fact that the new Artemis Fowl movie features Artemis as a hero rather than as a villain is probably an attempt from Disney to make the film more kid and family oriented. Nevertheless, the entire premise is changed, and when that happens the film just doesn’t honor the novel it’s adapting.

Of course, if this doesn’t deter you, you can go see the movie in theaters when it releases. It’s not a bad premise, but the hardcore fans will probably be passing on this one.

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Featured image via GameSpot 

Judy Blume Is (Finally) Ready for Hollywood

Just in time for Women’s History Month, beloved author Judy Blume has finally greenlit Lionsgate to bring the classic girl’s rite of passage novel Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret to the big screen. Since its publication in 1970, the iconic author has consistently denied Hollywood the rights to a movie, but now that Blume is nearing her mid-80s (though you’d never know it), she has decided we’re worthy of what’s sure to be a cinematic masterpiece:

 

If you’re not familiar with the book (you must read before the premiere), it’s a coming-of-age YA story of a sixth-grade girl’s search for god as she navigates the shaky grounds of puberty. With a Christian mother and Jewish father who choose not to raise Margaret religiously, and a group of friends who seem to be growing up much faster than she, neither feat proves easy for our outspoken little protagonist. The book has been updated several times since it’s original release to cater to the modern reader, but the heart of it remains a timeless classic nonetheless. After all… we will probably, unfortunately, always get our periods.

 

 

The film will be directed by the same woman responsible for the epic Edge of Seventeen film, Kelly Fremon Craig, who is an avid fan of Blume’s and is quite confident that she is the best one for the job of taking Margaret to the screen. This is all we know for now, but check back soon for updates, like who will play the leading lady!

featured image via av club

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‘The Woman in the Window’ Sparks Major Controversy

Dan Mallory’s thriller novel The Woman in the Window (written under pseudonym A.J. Finn) is headed to the big screen in May, spearheaded by English director Joe Wright. This won’t be Wright’s first rodeo when it comes to book adaptations; he is best known for his work directing Pride and Prejudice (2005), Atonement (2007)and Anna Karenina (2012)It is, however, the first to be met with severe criticism before even reaching the masses. Apparently, test audiences of the movie were left confused about the plot overall, forcing the crew into reshoots and a later release date than originally planned.

IMAGE VIA AMAZON

The film will star Amy Adams as Anna, an agoraphobic child psychologist who thinks she may have witnessed a violent crime while spying on her neighbors. If this plot sounds familiar, it’s probably because we’ve seen (and read) it countless times. “Unstable woman reports suspicious activity that no one believes due to her instability” has become something of a money-making formula (see: Gone Girl, The Girl on the Train, The Woman in Cabin 10). While we love that courageous female protagonists are having a moment, we’re not particularly in love with this trope.

Aside from the severely overdone narrative, much of the controversy surrounding the upcoming film centers around debuting author of the bestseller, Dan Mallory. You know the little white lies most of us tell to get into college or get out of a long day at work? Mallory has been accused of, and admitted to, lying about the death of his mom and brother and his own battle with brain cancer. This vaguely echoes the social-climbing John Early character who fakes cancer for a book deal in the hilarious TBS hit Search Party. Mallory, however, claims that his lies about physical health battles were to protect a very real struggle with mental illness. Whatever the case may be, Mallory’s overnight success remains impressive.

IMAGE VIA LA TIMES

Sometimes we just need to enjoy things for what they are, and with a star-studded cast and famed director, this is sure to be entertaining at the very least. If you’re a fan of female-lead thrillers, scoop up a copy of The Woman in the Window before you catch the film in May.

Featured image via Slash Film 


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Adaptations Round-Up! 10 Adaptations Coming out This Year!

Adaptations galore is coming this fall season! What are the ones that you should look forward to most? Well, stay tuned!

 

 

It Chapter 2

 

It: Chapter 2

Image Via Vanity Fair

 

A sequel to the horrifying film It, the ‘Loser’s Club’ is back twenty-seven years later (or two years later). The group returns to Derry, Maine, where the Losers must finish what they started: destroy Pennywise.

Who from our lovely ‘Loser’s Club’ will be lost in the ensuing bloodbath? How will these losers defeat Pennywise? Well, it’s based on a Stephen King novel that was released back in 1986, so the answers are out there and, um, it’s pretty wild. Remember to sing your praises to Maturin this September 6th!

 

 

Joker

 

Joker

Image Via Variety

 

An original standalone origin story for a character who infamously doesn’t have a definitive origin, this movie starring Joaquin Phoenix has clearly taken cues from Alan Moore’s The Killing Joke by making Arthur Fleck, a mentally ill man disregarded by society, into an up-and-coming comedian. In the iconic comic book, the unnamed man’s career in comedy ends in a chemical bath, but Arthur Fleck’s story might end on a different note entirely.

Is that scene, where Arthur Fleck, in full-fledged Joker makeup, goes on stage with Robert Di Niro a callback to The Dark Knight Returns scene when the Joker poisons the audience and the talk show host alike in a scene of ‘hilarious’ death?

 

 

We’ll find out this October 4th.

 

 

Nancy Drew

 

Having been around since 1930, Nancy Drew has been around longer than your parents (not judging) and she’s spent her time well: solving mysteries even when people told her she couldn’t.

This series has been around forever and if you haven’t read it, you’ve definitely heard of it. Well, we’re getting an adaptation of this series that’s set to debut on October 9, 2019 on the CW.

 

 

 

Looking for Alaska

 

The Fault in Our Stars broke our hearts, and now John Green is at it again. Or has he already broken our hearts beyond repair? The Fault in Our Stars was Green’s sixth novel and Looking for Alaska was his first novel, but for all of you who haven’t read the book, you’re in for something special.

Miles Halter is our man and through his eyes we are introduced to Alaska Young. A new student meets a timid young girl? Sounds like a love story made in heaven, until Miles soon learns that her life isn’t as perfect as he originally thought.

We’ll get a chance for our spirits to rise and our hearts to grow and break and grow again this October 14th.

 

 

HBO’s Watchmen

 

Another (sort of) Alan Moore adaptation, this version of Watchmen will be, in the words of showrunner Damon Lindelof, “a remix.”

For those of you who need to be brought up to speed, an alien invasion took place which ended the Cold War, but it was all a fake-out. Rorschach, before his untimely demise, sent his journal to the press where he laid a bread crumb trail to the truth.

What is known about this HBO series is that it takes place thirty-four years after the original comic left off. Taking place in an alternative reality in 2019 where this is no internet or smartphones, we are introduced to a United States where Robert Redford is now the longest-serving president, having been elected in 1992, a feat accomplished thanks to President Nixon abolishing the two-term limit back before the original comic book. Things are in disarray. A white supremacist group calling itself “The Seventh Cavalry,” with members who all wear homemade Rorschach masks, commits simultaneous attacks on the houses of police officers. Because of this, the police start wearing masks themselves.

What is this leading up to? Where are the original characters? Tune in to HBO October 20th find out.

 

 

Doctor Sleep

 

Another Stephen King adaptation, this one is an adaptation of Doctor Sleep, a sequel to The Shining. While the movie won’t be based on the Stanley Kubrick version, since the movie departs too much from the source material, this standalone is clearly drawing on the imagery set forth by Kubrick. Will it be any good? What’s going to happen?

The film arrives in theaters this November 8th.

 

 

 

The Good Liar

 

Catherine McKenzie brought us The Good Liar, and Warner Bros is bringing us the film adaptation. Ian McKellen is going to grace the screens as seasoned conman Roy Courtnay.

After he meets Betty McLeish online, he decides to steal a glorious amount of cash from her. But Betty McLeish, played by Helen Mirren, is too much for the conman and he finds herself falling for him. How will this sinister love affair turn out? See it in threaten this November 15th.

 

 

Cats

 

First, T.S. Eliot brought us Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats in 1939. From there we got a play, and now we’re getting a movie. The plot is hard to describe, but it basically follows a tribe of cats known as the ‘Jellicles’ who gather together to make the ‘Jellicle choice.’ Those who get the ‘Jellicle choice’ mean they can now be killed so they can go to heaven and come back because, you know, cats have nine lives.

Don’t get it? Doesn’t matter! There’s singing and there’s dancing and there’s this purr-fect trailer! It comes out December 20th.

 

 

His Dark Materials

 

Image via Amazon

 

This series has never been adapted before (we don’t talk about that other thing) and so THIS will be the first adaptation of Phil Pullman’s epic book series, His Dark Materials, in our books. The first season will draw upon the first book in the trilogy, following the life of a young Lyra (Dafne Keen) who is an orphan living with the tutors at Jordan College, Oxford. It’s not the Oxford you and I know, however, it’s an Oxford in an alternative world where all humans have animal companions called dæmons, which are the manifestations of their souls.

Lyra’s search for her missing friend will lead to uncovering a massive conspiracy linked to a mysterious substance called Dust and secrets from these two mysterious people, Lord Asriel (James McAvoy) and Marisa Coulter (Ruth Wilson).

If the first season is good (please let it be good), then we’ll be getting at least two more seasons! BBC One and HBO are teaming up, so hopefully they won’t disappoint us… In the meantime, however, I just want them to give a release date that’s more specific than “autumn.”

 

The Witcher

 

The Witcher is known as a great video game series, but did you know it started out a book series? In fact the saga is based on a series written by Andrzej Sapkowski that started in 1992 with Sword of Destiny. The last book in the series, Season of Storms came out in 2013.

The stories follow Geralt of Rivia, played by Henry Cavil, a solitary monster hunter who struggles to find his place in a world where people often prove more wicked than beasts. What will become of Geralt?

Check out the series on Netflix this sometime “late 2019”.

 

 

 

 

Featured Image Via HITC

Adaptation Of Horror Novel ‘The Troop’ Coming From James Wan

 

 

Though he has dabbled in action and fantasy films, James Wan is known for directing and producing horror films. He got his start with Saw and went on to create The Conjuring universe, as well as creating the short-lived Swamp Thing television series. Now, he’s adding another horror story to his resume.

 

Wan announced he has acquired the rights to the horror novel The Troop, written by Nick Cutter, and will produce a feature film adaptation. The film will be produced under his Atomic Monster production banner.

 

Image Via Wikipedia

 

The book tells the story of a scoutmaster who takes his troop on a camping trip for the weekend. The troop encounters a mysterious creature in the woods and must fight for their lives when they realize the creature is infected with a bio-engineered disease.

 

Image Via Amazon

 

The film will be directed by E.L. Katz, who has directed episodes of Swamp Thing as well as episodes of Syfy’s Channel Zero.

 

 

Have you read The Troop? Are you excited for this news?

 

 

Featured Image Via The Nerdist