Tag: fight club

Author Fight Club: William Faulkner VS Ernest Heminway

Now in real life, William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway had a tense relationship. That’s a nice way of saying they both thought the other was a garbage writer. So, in honor of Faulkner’s recent birthday celebration, we figured we would bring them together to settle their differences—by punching each other in the face.

So ignoring the broader themes of Chuck Palahniuk’s seminal work, Fight Club, we’re going to do what we do best and have two people fight each other.

Since we can’t talk about Fight Club (see rules one and two), we’re going to write about it. Specifically, we’re going to have two writers fight each other. Three rounds will determine their strength as we go through their power of description, their distinctive style, and their impact on the world at large.

Let’s fight!

 

 

1-Whose Writing Style is More Descriptive?

 

William Faulkner

Image Via Nobel Prize.org

 

Faulkner.

Actually, let’s wait up.

 

Ernest Hemingway

Ernie in his natural habitat / Image Via The Forward

 

Hemingway’s descriptions are brief and uncomplicated, yet his ability to paint such vivid imagery is astounding. Each word is a paintbrush and he puts them all together perfectly.

He’s the master of dialogue, but let’s look at his infamous short story: “Hills Like White Elephants“:

 

“What should we drink?” the girl asked. She had taken off her hat and
put it on the table.

“It’s pretty hot,” the man said.

“Let’s drink beer.”

“Dos cervezas,” the man said into the curtain.

“Big ones?” a woman asked from the doorway.

“Yes. Two big ones.”

The woman brought two glasses of beer and two felt pads. She put the felt pads and the beer glasses on the table and looked at the man and the girl. The girl was looking off at the line of hills. They were white in the sun and the country was brown and dry.

“They look like white elephants,” she said.

“I’ve never seen one,” the man drank his beer.

 

The dialogue is excellent, but I have one question for you: What do the characters look like?

It doesn’t matter what the charters looks like in this story, but we’re not talking about the power of this story, we’re using it as an example of Hemingway’s descriptive prowess.

 

A Rose for Emily

Image Via Inquiries Journal

 

Faulkner, unlike Hemingway, is known for his purple descriptions. Let’s look at A Rose for Emily: for an example, where he describes Miss Emily:

 

They rose when she entered–a small, fat woman in black, with a thin gold chain descending to her waist and vanishing into her belt, leaning on an ebony cane with a tarnished gold head. Her skeleton was small and spare; perhaps that was why what would have been merely plumpness in another was obesity in her. She looked bloated, like a body long submerged in motionless water, and of that pallid hue. Her eyes, lost in the fatty ridges of her face, looked like two small pieces of coal pressed into a lump of dough as they moved from one face to another while the visitors stated their errand.

 

Can’t you just picture it?

 

Hemingway writing

Image Via Quartz

 

Let’s get on some even ground through. What do the main buildings in these stories look like? Here’s an earlier passage from “Hills Like White Elephants”:

 

The hills across the valley of the Ebro’ were long and white. On this side there was no shade and no trees and the station was between two lines of rails in the sun. Close against the side of the station there was the warm shadow of the building and a curtain, made of strings of bamboo beads, hung across the open door into the bar, to keep out flies. The American and the girl with him sat at a table in the shade, outside the building. It was very hot and the express from Barcelona would come in forty minutes. It stopped at this junction for two minutes and went on to Madrid.

 

Well, we now know that the man and the woman are “the American” and “the girl”. Besides that, we know what isn’t there, such as trees and shade, and that there is a building with a curtain made of bamboo weeds as well as a bar. But what does the building look like? Is it big? Small? White?

Again, it doesn’t matter for this story, in fact it’s reservation is its greatest strength, but we’re not judging Hemingway for his story but for his description.

 

William Faulkner writing

Image VIa William Faulkner – WordPress

 

Here’s Faulkner describing a house in A Rose for Emily:

 

It was a big, squarish frame house that had once been white, decorated with cupolas and spires and scrolled balconies in the heavily lightsome style of the seventies, set on what had once been our most select street. But garages and cotton gins had encroached and obliterated even the august names of that neighborhood; only Miss Emily’s house was left, lifting its stubborn and coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and the gasoline pumps-an eyesore among eyesores. And now Miss Emily had gone to join the representatives of those august names where they lay in the cedar-bemused cemetery among the ranked and anonymous graves of Union and Confederate soldiers who fell at the battle of Jefferson.

 

We know the shape of the house, the fact it has a garage, the lights on the street, the history of the house, we know everything and anything we’ll need to know and even some things we might not need to know. Plus, the passage is bigger. Who’s got more description?

 

William Faulkner-happy
Don’t worry be happy / Image Via Literary Hub

 

Hemingway=0

Faulkner=1

 

 

2-STYLE?

Who’s got style? Whose method of writing is more memorable, distinctive, and just all around fabulous?!

Faulkner won last round, so he’s up at bat…

 

The Sound and the Fury
Image Via AMazon

 

Faulkner’s “The Sound and The Fury” experiments with switching perspectives, changing his style from chapter to chapter from children to an outcast to an insane characters and the illiterate. Like a musician he’s an expert at arrangement, building tension and breaking while at the same time filling it with a high emotions and Gothic elements. His characters are wide ranging and diverse, from descendant of slaves to poor whites to working-class Southerners and the aristocracy from old and traditional Southern families.

He experiments with everything and anything, but sadly this comes at a loss. What is his style? Flowery prose?

 

Hemingway writing away

Image Via Wikipedia

 

A pioneer of iceberg theory, Hemingway was known for his minimalist style. The idea of it is to write as little as possible with the truth lurking beneath like an iceberg.

As a foreign correspondent for the Toronto Star, while living in Paris in the early 1920s, Hemingway covered the Greco-Turkish War. His biographer Jeffrey Meyers explains that Hemingway “objectively reported only the immediate events in order to achieve a concentration and intensity of focus—a spotlight rather than a stage.” He brought this to fiction, believing that if an experience were to be distilled, then “what he made up was truer than what he remembered.”

Yes, “Hills like White Elephants” isn’t heavy on description and the dialogue doesn’t explain anything, but it doesn’t take a literary master to realize that the building with the beaded curtain is an abortion clinic. The story is about two people discussing about having an abortion.

His books are loaded with symbolism, but it all comes naturally. Why? Well, as Hemingway explained when he received the Nobel prize for literature (don’t worry fans, Faulkner got the same prize):

 

No good book has ever been written that has in it symbols arrived at beforehand and stuck in… That kind of symbol sticks out like raisins in raisin bread. Raisin bread is all right, but plain bread is better… I tried to make a real old man, a real boy, a real sea, a real fish and real sharks. But if I made them good and true enough they would mean many things. The hardest thing is to make something really true and sometimes truer than true.

 

Who’s got a distinct style? Faulkner’s certainly got style, but experimentation means people can’t pick you up at first glance. Maybe that’s a good thing, but for this competition it’s a bad thing.

Point for Hemingway!

 

Hemingway smiling

Don’t worry be happy / Image Via The Daily Beast

 

Hemingway=1

Faulkner=1

 

 

3-INFLUENCE/IMPACT

Both of these authors have made classic works, but whose influenced more authors?

 

Faulkner and Hemingway
Image VIa The Telegraph

Faulkner created revelations of life in the south, challenging perceptions of the area, but these revelations often hit on deaf ears because he makes the readers work for it. Like Joyce and Wolfe, his craft of social critique through fiction is as masterful as it is incredible.

Now I have to talk about the bad stuff.

The long and short of it is people don’t get him, so many stop reading. Even those that finished are often left in a state of confusion, as was one interview who posed Faulkner this question: “Some people say they can’t understand your writing, even after they’ve read it two or three times. What approach would you suggest for them?”

Faulkner’s response? “Read it four times.”

Let’s give Faulkner credit: he certainly has more complex emotions than Hemingway’s archetypal heroes have and he certainly has a style, given his love of the Gothic South and his frequent use of stream of consciousness. He’s far more experimental than Hemingway, but that’s hard to imitate.

 

Hemingway in Africa

Image Via Encyclopedia Britannica

 

Ernest Hemingway, on the other hand, is known not only for his iceberg theory and his terse, journalistic style, but his love of traveling. His stories have us drinking in Paris, trekking through Spain, warring in Italy, fishing in Cuba, and hunting in Africa.

As the pioneer of a simple style, his influence is everywhere. Plus, in the age of social media, what do you think people are reading more: long-winded symphonies of words, or pages filled with as little words as possible?

Point for Hemingway!

 

Hemingway

Image Via National Post

 

Hemingway=2

Faulkner=1

 

 

 

Winner: Hemingway

 

 

THE MATCH

Sweat poured down his face. On his knees, hands wrapped around his gun, Ernest Hemingway leaned against a rock. He had to lean his head down forward so Faulkner wouldn’t get a shot at him. Taking a breath, heart jackhammering in his chest, Hemingway looked down at his trusty rifle. The edges were worn, the gears were light with rust, but it could still fire a shot, or at least he believed it could.

He hadn’t fired a single shot yet. Not biggie, neither had Faulkner. Hidden in his home, the door shut, the blind cautiously drawn, leaving only a inch of space where the black eye of a rifle, similarly worn and rusty, pointed out at the bolder. Hemingway could feel the black eye of Faulkner’s rifle just above him. His neck hurt, every bone in his body urged him to pick his head up and crane his neck, just for a small stretch, but he knew the moment he did Faulkner would take his shot. He had to move something, anything, so moved the only thing that was safe to move: his mouth.

“You bloody drunk!” Hemingway screamed.

His voice echoed through the wide open plains and came back to him. The echo rang out in his ear. Take the shot. Stand up and fire.

“And you’re a coward!” Faulkner screamed from inside his house.

“I am not!” Hemingway barked, still hiding behind his rock.

“Are so!”

“Stop hiding then!” Faulkner screamed. “Oh, but you won’t, will you? You would never crawl out on a limb. You have no courage and have never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary.”

That attack on his manhood felt like a punch in his manhood. “Poor Faulkner,” Hemingway spat. “Do you really think big emotions come from big words? You think I don’t know the ten-dollar words. I know them all right. But there are older and simpler and better words, and those are the ones I use.”

“I am lambas and ambrosia!” Faulkner was hurling fire at him, firing with great speed, “And you are bread and beer!”

“Everyone loves beer!” Hemingway shot back. “Now face me, you coward!”

But Faulkner did not. He did not speak, and Hemingway did not respond. He simply sat behind his rock, crouched there, his eyes squinting from the sun.

His eyes were narrowed. The moon shined a light upon him, like the bright lights on the stage. Should he stand? Is it worse to die a coward, or to die sober?

“I will get that liquor,” Hemingway muttered, and with that he jumped out from behind the rock, turned, and saw that the rifle wasn’t in the window.

Taking a breath, rifle aimed in front of him, Hemingway approached the house.

Coming to the door, he kicked it open. A useless gesture, the door was already unlocked.

Swinging his head from left to right, Hemingway saw on the left was Faulkner, lying on the ground.

“I’ve won,” Hemingway said, “I’ve won!” He threw his rifle to the ground, but it did not come away from his hand. It was stuck there, thanks to sweat and fear. Who cares? After all this time, fighting from dusk til dawn, he had won out.

Victorious, Hemingway marched passed Faulkner and found his liquor cabinet. Smiling wide, he opened the cabinet wide.

But all the bottles were empty. With that revelation, Hemingway cried.

 

 

 

Image Via Writers Write.co

5 Books You Can’t Just Can’t Listen To

You read the title, you know what this article is about. With all the hoopla over the last hundred or so years of us asking the same few questions (Will the book die out? Is the book dead?) over and over again, I’ve decided to do something a little more productive than just roll my eyes.

I’ve decided to give you five great books that you just can’t listen to. Yes, you may be able to find some actor with the soothing chirp of Michael Caine or the deep drawl of Morgan Freeman, but simply listening isn’t going to give you the full experience. For these books, you have to read them yourself.

I think you get the idea.

Now for this list I’ve discounted Mad Libs, coloring books, pop up books, or any comic book/graphic novels/manga. None of those will be appearing on this list. You’re old enough to know that you can’t just hear the soothing voice of a Stephen Fry while you’re running on the treadmill to get the full picture—you actually have to open up the comic book and read it. There’s no use of me reiterating that for the hundredth time.

What’ll be on this list are books. Books with spines and pages and words. Ready?

 

 

5. Hopscotch by Julio Cortázar

 

Hopscotch: A Novel (Pantheon Modern Writers Series) by [Cortazar, Julio]
Image Via Amazon

Written in Paris, Hopscotch was published in Spanish in 1963 and in English in 1966. Okay, so we’ve got Horacio Oliveira, an Argentinian writer who lives in Paris with his mistress, La Maga. Everything is going well until a child dies and La Maga disappears off the face of the planet. Not sure what to do, Oliveira returns to Buenos Aires, where he works by turns as a salesman, a keeper of a circus cat which can truly count, and an attendant in an insane asylum.

Easy, right?

 

Rayuela

The Spanish Version / Image Via Wikipedia

 

Oh yeah, ninety-nine chapters are expendable. You read that right, expendable. Meaning they are useless, that they can be cut out of the book with no loss to the story, and with a book that’s 155 chapters in total, that means that about 63.87% of the book can be thrown out in the trash.

Why didn’t the editor do his/her job? I hear you ask, and the answer is why this book made this list.

See there are a couple of ways to read this book. You can read it from chapter one to chapter fifty six, or you can “hopscotch” throughout the book using the “Table of Instructions”. Or you can go completely random.

 

Julio Cortazar

Image Via AZ Quotes

 

Reading the book in order means that ninety-nine expendable chapters will make little to no sense. They’re nothing more than random musings.

Reading them using the “Table of Instructions” means that some of these expendable chapters can be revelations. See, the entire book is written in an episodic, snapshot manner. A real slice of lie type story. These expendable chapters, when you put them in order, can add information about the characters, such as giving more information about this guy named Morelli who pops up for a small cameo in the novel. At first, he’s random. Diving deep, we realize what he means.

Point is, these “expendable” chapters at first seem like random musings, but upon closer inspection some of these ‘musings’ are actually answers in disguise.

 

Image result for Julio Cortazar
Image Via La tinta

Wait! I hear you say, can’t we just have two audio versions: One where a narrator goes through the book linearly and one where he “hopscotches” around using the “Table of Instructions”.

Well, assuming money is no obstacle, yes, but you forget about the third way to read this book: figure it out yourself.

Remember how I said reading the table means that only *some* of the expendable chapters make sense? That’s where making it up as you go along comes. Yes, that part where I said “you can go completely random” wasn’t a joke. In fact, Cortázar himself gives the reader the option of choosing a unique path through the narrative.

The book is a puzzle. It’s a choose your own adventure where you are left on your own devise to figure out the timeline between all these chapters. It won’t be easy, given that the narratives techniques switch from first person and third person to stream-of-consciousness and traditional spelling and grammatical rules are often bent or even outright broken, but this isn’t your typical book.

It’s a book you can’t just simply listen it.

 

4. Chuck Palahniuk’s Invisible Monsters Remix

 

Invisible Monsters Remix by [Palahniuk, Chuck]
Image Via Amazon

Do you like Chuck Palahniuk? He wrote Fight Club, and I love Fight Club. I can’t stop talking about Fight Club. Did you know that Chuck Palahniuk, author of Fight Club, thinks Fight Club is better than Fight Club?

Chuck Palahniuk also wrote Invisible Monsters, a novel about a fashion model who has everything: a boyfriend, a career, a loyal best friend, but loses it all from when a sudden freeway “accident” leaves her disfigured and unable to speak. She becomes an ‘invisible monster,’ but then Brandy Alexander, Queen Supreme, walks into her life and teaches her that reinventing yourself means erasing your past and making up something better.

It’s a great book, and I wish I could talk about it, but I won’t. Instead I’ll talk about what Palahniuk deems the ‘director’s cut’ called Invisible Monsters Remix.

 

Invisible Monsters Remix

Image Via Amazon

 

This remix chops up the original story, presenting it in short scenes which end with a request to skip to another page. It’s a choose-your-own-adventure novel in which readers must follows the directions and flip through the book a la Hopscotch, but this book takes it one step beyond.

Yes, you can read the book linearly, yes you can flip around and, as per the introduction “jump to Chapter Forty-one,” or you could go completely random, but Palahniuk takes it one step beyond.

For a start, you can take out a pen and mark up the book. I’m serious. See, Palahniuk has added  new chapters interspersed throughout the book and you can get lost flipping through the book. To solve this, the author himself encourages you, dear reader, to mark each page with an ‘x’ so when you get to the end (which is in the middle) you can look back to see if you’ve missed any pages.

You will miss pages. About three three chapters worth, in fact.

Plus, unlike Hopscotch, Palahinuk has this:

 

This is real

Image Via Danielshankcruz.files.wordpress

 

There’s nothing like two sequences where the pages that are printed backwards so you gotta use a mirror to read them. Wouldn’t you agree that the experience be less if you just listened to someone reading the pages normally?

 

3. S by Doug Dorst and J. J. Abrams

 

 

Image Via Amazon

 

The book is called S, but not really. It’s actually called Ship of Theseus, but not really. Let me explain.

Ship of Theseus was written by an elusive author named V. M. Straka and published in 1949.

S was written by Doug Dorst and J.J. Abrams, and they wrote three stories that are packaged into one.

The core story is Ship of Theseus by V. M. Straka, published in 1949, which is about an amnesiac, known only as S., who’s trying to figure out who he really is after waking up in a strange city who becomes trapped in a conflict between a violent, oppressive industrialist and his rebellious workers.

The book has footnotes describing how the author, V. M. Straka, was a secretive anarchist who might have written this book as an allegory of a real conflict and assassination conspiracy of which he was a part. No one knows who Straka is and supposedly he is dead, but the book’s editor, F. X. Caldeira, not only wrote the introduction but also included various footnotes throughout the book that seem to contain coded messages in an attempt to contact Straka.

 

S-Inside The Book

Image Via Pinterest

 

Now the book itself is a mock-up of a high school library’s check-out history of the book, spanning the years 1957 to 2000. A grad student named Eric has been working on his own theory of who Straka was, writing his notes in the margins. Jen, an undergrad student who works at the college library, writes out her responses in the margins, creating a conversation as they trade the book back and forth, blossoming into a romance as soon as they begin to encounter some danger by people who don’t want the truth to be known.

 

S-Everything Inside

Everything The Book Comes With / Image Via Emily Short’s Interactive Storytelling

 

One book, three stories.

 

 

2.  The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall

 

The Raw Shark Texts by [Hall, Steven]

Image Via AMazon

 

Do you like pictures? Do you like words? How about pictures made out of words? Well there’s a word for that and it’s calligrams and this book is choc-full of them. Moving text, text that forms pictures, giant texts to emphasize words, this book has it.

Let’s take a step back.

A man named Eric Sanderson wakes up in a house he doesn’t recognize, unable to remember anything of his life. A note instructs him to call a Dr. Randle, who informs him he’s had another episode of memory loss.

Apparently this has been happening for the last two years, but Eric isn’t too sure. He decides to learn the truth, escaping the predatory forces that threaten to consume him.

Postmodern magic rituals, conceptual predators swimming the abstract depths of consciousness, this psychological odyssey is a brilliant story by its own, but Hall takes one step beyond.

The text loops and swerves, putting the reader in Hall’s mindset.

 

The Raw Shark Texts-Swerving Words

Image Via Goodreads

 

It even gives us an image of what Hall sees with images like this:

 

The Raw Shark Texts-Eye

Image Via Than Words

 

Try have someone reading that text out loud! Hall knows that simply saying “an eye appeared” wouldn’t be as powerful as showing us an eye made up of words, making our skin crawl as we feel multiple eyes staring right as us through the very page itself.

But Hall then doesn’t just make the text see, he gives it a face.

 

The Raw Shark Texts-Shark

Image Via Pinterest

 

A picture is worth a thousand words, and these pictures are made of words

 

1. House of Leaves by Mark Z Danielewski

 

Image Via Amazon

 

This book is 709 pages and I read it over the courage of two days. My eyes could not be peeled away. I was lying on the bathroom floor in a hotel at midnight, my cousin’s wedding in eight hours, and I refused to close the book. My brother was asleep in the next room so I couldn’t turn on the light, so I went in the bathroom and lay across the floor and read this book until I was finished.

My cousin’s wedding is a blur, but this book isn’t.

House of Leaves is about a house that is about a little less than an inch bigger on the inside than it is on the outside.

Let’s back up. We start off with a first-person narrative by Johnny Truant, a Los Angeles tattoo parlour employee and professed unreliable narrator. Looking for an apartment, Traunt finds out about the meant of the recently deceased Zampanò, a blind, elderly man.

Curious, Traunt goes to the apartment and finds that the blind man was writing a book. Yes, the blind man was writing a book. The book is an academic study of a documentary film called The Navidson Record, even though, according to Traunt, there’s no evidence that the film or its subjects ever existed, even though Zampanò quotes the likes of famous figures from Stephen King to Stanley Kubrick and Anne Rice.

 

Mark Z Danielewski

Image Via KCRW

 

From here, Traunt’s story is told through increasingly long footnotes sprinkled into The Navidson Record, which is about a documentarian who moves into a house with his family and realizes that their house is bigger on the inside than the outside.

What’s more, the house seems to be expanding while the outside stays the same. Plus, a dark, cold hallway opens in an exterior living room wall that should project outside into their yard, but does not. It’s also impossible to shine a light in this hallway and, furthermore, seems to be shifting and growing.

The book utilizes different fonts to distinguish characters. These are: Times New Roman (Zampanò), Courier (Johnny), Bookman (The Editors), and Dante (Johnny’s mother).

It also uses color changes.

 

A Red Passage from 'House of Leaves'

Image Via Fox Burrow Magazine

 

The word “house” is colored blue (gray for non-color editions of the book and light gray for red editions.

The word Minotaur and all struck passages are colored red.

References to Johnny’s mother are colored purple.

This is just the basic stuff right here.

 

House of Leaves

Image VIa Goodreads

 

A prime example of ergodic literature, the book contains copious footnotes, many of which contain footnotes themselves…

 

Image VIa Ergodic Design

 

…while other pages contain only a few words or lines of text…

 

House of Leaves

Image Via Goodreads

 

…some of the text is arranged to mirror the events in the story or a character’s mind…

 

Image result for House of Leaves danielewski footnotes
Image Via The Reader’s Room

 

There are sections where there were just a few words on the page while a chase was happening so you sped through the pages like you were running through the halls and there are sections where the dialogue from people on top of a staircase was high on the page while speech from the characters down below was on the bottom of the page.

 

House of Leaves

Image Via Cornerfolds

 

Housse of Leaves
Image Via Goodreads

 

Give me audiobook of that! You can’t, because to read this book, to read all these books, you have to do more than skim through the pages, you have to interact with them. You have to rip them apart, mark them up, twist them and turn them.

Call these big five art, call these big five artsy, call these big five pretentious, I call them the reason why “The book is dead” question makes my eyes roll into the back of my head.

 

 

 

Featured Images Via Amazon

Anjelica Huston as The Grand High Witch in The Witches

6 Times the Book and Movie Had COMPLETELY Different Endings

Some (especially me!) would say that the ending is the most important part of the story. It is the last chance for the author to effect the audience, to really say something. It is the moment when everything comes together, the moment that everything builds to. Here, the intentions behind the story become clear.

Which is why it’s really frustrating, blood-boiling even, when the movie changes the ending! Here are six movie adaptations that completely changed the book’s ending. Some of them make for a better story, but not all of them. Especially not that film.

Oh yeah, spoilers. But these books and films are like —*mental math sounds* —old.

 

6. The Witches

 

According to Syfy, the 1990 film The Witches is the most iconic Roald Dahl adaptation. It’s both terrifying and awe-inspiring. The witches have, as described in the book, bald heads, eyes that change color, and toeless feet. Heck, just look at the Grant High Witch (Anjelica Huston) in all her glory:

 

Image result for witches, grand high witch
IMAGE VIA BOOK PUNKS

 

Just kidding. That’s just her unmasking. This is what she REALLY looks like:

 

Image result for witches, grand high witch
IMAGE VIA SYFY WIRE

 

Most 90s kids will agree that image sent shivers up their spine and is burnt into their consciousness. The story follows a little boy named Luke Eveshim who unwittingly stumbles upon the annual meeting of witches, taking place in the hotel where he is staying with his grandmother. The witches are planning to turn children into mice, and Luke is one of their first victims.

The film follows the 1983 child’s book of the same name rather closely. That is, until the ending. In the book, Luke remains a mouse, however this is not portrayed as a sad ending, as his lifespan as a mouse will be about equal to the amount of time his grandmother has left alive, and thus they will live out the remainder of their lives together.

In the film, HOWEVER, one of the witches doesn’t like how the Grand High Witch is treating her so she bails, and tracks down Luke (who is still a mouse), reversing the spell and turning him back into a little boy.

BBC News reported that Roald Dahl, dismissed this film’s ending as “utterly appalling”. Personally, I think after seeing their interpretation of the Grand High Witch,  I’d cut the film some slack for its happy ending.

 

5. The Shining

 

We’ve all absorbed the story through the cultural zeitgeist—through either reading the Stephen King novel, seeing the Stanley Kubrick film, or just seeing enough stills and hearing enough quotes from the film to consider ourselves fairly familiar with one of the most iconic thrillers of the modern age. So, as you probably know, The Shining follows Jack Torrence (portrayed by Jack Nicholson), a man struggling with both with writer’s block and alcoholism, who brings his family to a remote hotel he can finally complete his play.

 

IMAGE VIA THE EUROPEAN UNION TIMES

 

Unfortunately, the two creators – King and Kubrick – were fundamentally at odds with each other. According to The Guardian, King received one call from the infamous director which went something like this:

Kubrick: “I think stories of the supernatural are fundamentally optimistic, don’t you? If there are ghosts then that means we survive death.”

King: “What’s that mean?”

(A long pause)

Kubrick: “I don’t believe in hell.”

So the two creators didn’t see eye to eye. What more is that the films diverge far before the ending. According to Steven King, “in the book, there’s an actual arc where you see this guy, Jack Torrance, trying to be good, and little by little he moves over to this place where he’s crazy. And as far as I was concerned, when I saw the movie, Jack was crazy from the first scene.”

Knowing this, it’s hard to explain why these two approaches reach vastly different endings. In the novel, Jack Torrence regains his senses and sacrifices himself – giving his son Danny and wife Wendy time to escape with Dick Hallorann.

In the Kubrick film, Danny runs from a crazy Jack through a hedge maze ( the book features topiary animals that come to life, but no giant hedge maze) and eventually evades Jack. Exhausted, Jack collapses to the ground while the others escape – without Dick Hallorann as he is killed in the film version – and Jack freezes to death.

 

Image result for kubrick frozen jack
IMAGE VIA SICK CHIRPSE

As Steven King said, “…the book ends in fire, and the movie in ice.”

That sums it up pretty well.

 

4. Fight Club

 

Here’s a case in which the author actually preferred the film adaptation to their own book.

Chuck Palahniuk’s novel Fight Club ends with with Jack/Tyler Durdan in a mental hospital. Yeah, that was inevitable.

 

Image result for fight club
IMAGE VIA IFC CENTER

But the David Fincher film gets revolutionary. Jack holds hands with Marla while Project Mayhem goes off without a hitch, and the city’s buildings crumble to the ground. Brief shot of a penis (see the movie, read the book to get it) before we cut to credits.

 

Image result for palahniuk chuck
IMAGE VIA FAMOUS BIOGRAPHIES

Mr. Palahniuk himself said in an interview “…when I sat down…[to]…record a commentary track for the DVD, I was sort of embarrassed of the book, because the movie had streamlined the plot and made it so much more effective and made connections that I had never thought to make”.

So the film is Palahniuk approved.

 

3. A Clockwork Orange (1971)

 

Oh, Kubrick. I love you – you made greats films like 2001: A Space Odyssey and Dr. Strangelove: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb – but sometimes, you were too smart for your own good.

What was I talking about? Oh yeah: in 1962 Anthony Burgess published A Clockwork Orange and 1971 saw the release of the Kubrick’s film. While Anthony Burgess made it clear he didn’t want to be remembered by this novel, his fate was fixed when Kubrick had a young Malcolm McDowell stare into a camera lens, his glassy eyes gazing right through the audience.

 

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IMAGE VIA INDIE WIRE

Both stories follow the character of Alex before and after his imprisonment. While the plot of the novel and the film are largely the same (except for character swaps here and there) the endings differ.

In the film Alex is de-conditioned during his recuperation in a hospital, during which time, he meets with government office and makes a deal with them: Alex will tell everyone the government isn’t at fault and they are friends (even though the government in this dystopian setting are to blame for Alex being literally unable to defend himself). After this deal, Alex looks at the camera and goes, “I was cured alright,” as Beethoven’s 9th blare out. Alex’s fantasies are back in full wind and he faces no more consequences for his actions.

 

IMAGE VIA THE INTERNATIONAL ANTHONY BURGESS FOUNDATION

The novel, on the other hand, includes an extra chapter. In Chapter Twenty-One, Alex finds an old friend, Pete, who is now married and settled down. Alex begins imagining that kind of life for himself, signifying his change into adulthood. Consequence of Sound quotes Anthony Burgess as saying, “My young hoodlum comes to the revelation of the need to get something done in life.”

 

2. First Blood

 

The iconic 1982 movie is based on David Morrell’s 1972 novel First Blood, in which Rambo dies!

Yes, the iconic character dies. Also, his name is Rambo in the book. Just Rambo. The film takes extensive liberties such as giving Rambo a first name (John).

 

Book cover for First Blood by David Morrell
IMAGE VIA CANNONBALL READ

 

In the film, Rambo goes after Sheriff Teastle and, as he prepares to kill him, his commanding officer Trautman arrives to stop Rambo. Rambo ceases fighting and surrenders to Trautman in order to be taken into custody.

However, in the novel, Rambo puts a stick of dynamite against his chest when he goes after Sheriff Teastle. But Sheriff Teastle doesn’t fire back and that Rambo is too weak to light the dynamite. Alas, he is then shot in the head. No sequel for Rambo. Trautman has put him out of his misery and Teasle feels a moment of affection for Rambo before he dies.

 

First Blood movie poster feature Stallone
IMAGE VIA ALL POSTER

Both mediums are about Vietnam veterans, but the novel, released during the Vietnam War, depicts a character unable to stop fighting while the film, released seven years after the war officially ended, shows a character who is willing to surrender for the greater good.

 

1. I Am Legend

This totally isn’t that film that I was talking about in the beginning. Calm down.

So Richard Matheson’s book and the 2007 film starring Will Smith have the same premise: a man walks alone in a post-apocalyptic city filled with plague monsters. In the book, they’re vampires. In the film, they’re zombies. Oh well. I can live with that. So far, so good.

 

I Am Legend book cover by Richard Matheson featuring hoard of vampires
IMAGE VIA AMAZON

The movie ends with Will Smith’s Dr. Robert Neville in an all-out brawl with the infected zombies, eventually sacrificing himself to save other survivors while they escape with a cure.

Movie poster for I Am Legend featuring Will Smith
IMAGE VIA ROTTEN TOMATOES

The book ends with Robert Neville attacking in an all-out brawl with the infected zombies, eventually realizing that he has become a monster. The world is no longer meant for humans – and the monsters fear him the way he fears them. He understands that their desire to kill him is not something he can condemn and thus resigns from life, leaving the earth to the monsters.

Get a load of this kicker: the filmmakers actually had the book’s original ending in the script. Heck, they even filmed that ending. But it didn’t do well with test audiences, so it was given a Hollywood ending. Even the film’s director, Francis Lawrence, told Screen Rant, “I agree [the book has] the better ending.”

Dear children, I’m not mad. I’m disappointed.

 

 

Featured Image Via Potentash

Chuck Palahniuk and the cover of 'Fight Club 3'

Chuck Palahniuk Is Writing ‘Fight Club 3’ and It’s a Little Different…

Ah, Fight Club. Chuck Palahniuk’s 1996 novel about an unnamed insomniac narrator finding solace in beating the absolute heck out of other people—and being beaten back in turn— that winds through a mind-boggling plot, driven by the novel’s demented antagonist, Tyler Durden. The story ends with one of the most startling twists in fiction, and has earned an enormous following and birthed several beloved quotes, including: “The things you used to own, now they own you.” and “It’s only after we’ve lost everything that we’re free to do anything.”

 

Cover of 'Fight Club'

Image via AbeBooks

 

The novel was left as a standalone until 2015, when Fight Club 2: The Tranquility Gambit was released. Fight Club 2 is a comic book “meta-sequel” to its predecessor, and continues the story of the original protagonist as told by the original antagonist (no spoilers, but if you know how Fight Club ends that plot device is way more compelling then your typical antagonist-as-narrator story).

 

Cover of 'Fight Club 2'

Image via Amazon

 

Now, Palahniuk has just announced that Fight Club 3 is on its way! This upcoming installment will throw a new complication into the already chaotic Fight Club universe: a child. There’s no telling what Tyler Durden is going to do now that he’s got to deal with a baby around but I, for one, am deeply concerned.

 

In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, Palahniuk gave this little tidbit about the comic:

 

Fight Club 3 is about what happens when you need to team up with your enemy,” Palahniuk said in a statement. “And the situation is even more complicated here, given Tyler Durden and Balthazar’s unique relationship. And, yes, bodily fluids will be exchanged.

 

Sounds gross but cool, much as I would expect from Palahniuk. The first issue of the comic will be published by Dark Horse Comics on January 30th, which ought to be plenty of time for all of us to catch up on the series.

 

Cover and variant covers of 'Fight Club 3'

Image via Comic Book Resources

 

Featured Image Via Flavorwire and Comic Book Resources

Chuck Palahniuk

‘Fight Club’ Author Chuck Palahniuk’s Newest Book Promises to Offend

Chuck Palahniuk, author of the iconic novel-turned-Academy-Award-nominated film Fight Club is releasing a new book in May 2018. 

 

His upcoming novel, titled Adjustment Day, will reach bookshelves on May 1, 2018. It will be published by W.W. Norton & Company, who has worked will Palahniuk before and published Fight Club, Invisible Monsters, and Survivor.

 

Though Palahniuk and his publishers have remained vague on plot details, the novel promises to be a hell of a read, according to a press release.

 

The press release goes on to say:

 

Fight Club put Palahniuk on the map as a transgressive visionary. Now, Adjustment Day blows past all previous markers for impropriety with a brilliant, hilarious, and outrageous story that is perfect for our era. Every reader, of every stripe, will find something in Adjustment Day that is as profoundly wise, funny, and affecting as it is offensive. And, make no mistake, everyone will be offended.

 

Palahniuk goes on to compare his newest novel to perhaps his most popular work, stating:

 

W.W. Norton brought my first book, Fight Club, into the world. My next book, Adjustment Day, is to Fight Club what Atlas Shrugged is to The Fountainhead—a bigger package of bold characters and norm-bashing ideas. And it’s proof that W.W. Norton and I have great faith in one another. I’m pleased as punch to be working once more with such a brave, ground-breaking publisher.

 

While readers should stay tuned for additional details regarding Adjustment Day, brave fans can go ahead and pre-order the novel today.

 

Featured image via The Talks / Amazon