Tag: feminist

#Bookstagrammer of the Week: @booksturnyouon

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This Week’s Featured creator: @booksturnyouon

 

Each week Bookstr is going to be highlighting your favorite Bookstagrammers. A Bookstagrammer is someone who shares all of their literary interests, ranging from book reviews and aesthetically pleasing book pictures to outfit pictures featuring their current reads. Anything that evokes bibliophile feels is on their Instagram pages. Make sure to give these Bookstagrammers the love they deserve! This week we are getting to know a Bookstagram account that is worldly and feminine positive: Cátia, or as you would know her on Instagram, @booksturnyouon.

Here is her story:

image via @booksturnyouon

 

 

Chapter 1: The Birth of a Bookstagram Account

 

When Cátia stumbled into the Bookstagram community, she decided she wanted to find a way to share her love of bookish culture with her country too.

At the time, I had been studying Portuguese Literature for at least seven years. However, and sadly, I didn’t encounter people who loved reading as often. I had this major passion but couldn’t really share it with anyone. I just wanted to discuss books with others. So, one night I was in bed and couldn’t sleep. I was checking my personal Instagram account and Penguin Random House stories came up. They had shared a post by @bookbaristas. That’s how I found the world of Bookstagram. I couldn’t find one similar account in Portugal, where I’m from. So that’s when I decided to become a Bookstagrammer!

 

Cátia is a fan of world lit, so her favorite books come from many different countries and genres, including:

 

image via @booksturnyouon

 

Cátia’s fun fact is that she reads in a very unique way.

When I connect to a character in a book, I like to say their lines out loud, like I am playing their role in a movie or something. I think that’s funny and I have no idea if other readers do the same. It’s just something I do because I feel very close to that character. My world completely fades away to be replaced by that life. But, when I notice that I am doing it, I laugh at myself.

 

 

Chapter 2: To The Bookstagramming

 

Bookstagrammers have a trained eye that finds the most photogenic book covers to post to their Bookstagram. Cátia has lots of favorites, but there’s one in particular that stood out to her.

Alfred A. Knopf shared the cover of Yaa Gyasi’s new novel that’s coming out on July 2020 and I must say that it’s terrific! I even shared it on my stories because I was amazed when I saw it.

 

https://www.instagram.com/p/B4VRH9Ug1kF/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

image via @booksturnyouon

 

 

Cátia’s followers consider her personal Bookstagram aesthetic to be vintage.

My aesthetic reflects my own personal style and taste. I love to have a balance between reviews, bookshops, outfits and even lifestyle so I have that in mind when I am creating content.

 

 

What are Cátia’s favorite Bookstagram accounts, and what advice would she give to aspiring Bookstagrammers?

My favorite accounts are @magicpages, @bookmateriality, @brisoler, @umacertagabi, and @coffeeandbookss. I love their authenticity and deep and well-argued reviews. Moreover, all these Bookstagrammers have similar literary tastes to mine so I end up connecting more with their accounts.

If aspiring Bookstagrammers are looking for a curated feed, then I’d recommend to think carefully about the kind of aesthetic they would like to have. The Instagram handle is also important. And, I would suggest they take some photos before creating the account so they can share content consistently at the beginning!

 

 

Chapter 3: TBR

Cátia has over 200 books on her TBR list—that’s a lot of reads! Some of her top TBR books are:

 

Cátia’s publisher of choice to supply her with a lifetime of books would be Riverhead Books of Penguin Random House.

They publish great books and they have an amazing team!

 

https://www.instagram.com/p/B1lyP2vA-fv/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

image via @booksturnyouon

 

 

Chapter 4: What does bookstagram mean to you?

 

It means a lot. It was life-changing for me. I’ve always thought I wasn’t particularly creative. That’s why I was researching literature instead of writing. For a person who has always loved all forms of art, that made me feel sad. Then, when I created my account two years ago, I had no pressure. I just wanted to have fun and create. So, that’s what happened. In such an innocent and unexpected way, I discovered I am very creative. Today, I work as a creative director and I write. As important as this, my account is a digital space where I can share my passions and ideas: books, bookshops, feminism, fashion. 

I want my account to inspire people to read more. I want to introduce my followers to books they haven’t heard about. I want my account to be a digital space where people can actually have meaningful discussions about books. And, I also discuss feminism on my account so I want to raise awareness. I want to spread the meaning of tolerance, respect and equality on Books Turn You On.

 

Well, what did you think of @booksturnyouon? Isn’t it amazing how passionate she is about spreading her love for books and creativity? Do you have a favorite Bookstagrammer in mind? Contact us through any of our social media platforms and maybe you will see them here next week! 

 

Want to see your favorite Bookstagrammer featured next? Message @bookstrofficial here.

 

Featured image via @booksturnyouon

 

Feminist Dystopia ‘Last Ones Alive’ Is Getting a Film Adaptation!

The film rights to Sarah Davis-Goff’s dystopian novel Last Ones Left Alive have been acquired by Irish production company Treasure Entertainment, which means we’re getting a film adaptation on the way!

"The Last Ones Left Alive" Cover

Image Via Goodreads

Last Ones Left Alive oscillates between a young Orpen training as a child on her peaceful island-home of Slanbeg and Orpen as an adult traveling towards the mysterious Phoenix City.

Add in a four-legged companion and her wounded, wheelbarrow-bound guardian and you have a harrowing journey made all the more despite, and thus dramatic.

 

Sarah Davis-Groff

Image Via Irish Times

The Times writes that “[Sarah Davis-Goff] sees it as a wasteful dismissal of ‘the experiences, viewpoints and brilliant work of women’. Her enjoyable debut novel suffers from no such deficit,” and that might be the best summation of this novel.

Feminist, kickass, The Guardian noted that the novel “runs compellingly enough to an irresistible internal logic of violence,” with the The Irish Times writing “Davis-Goff blends narrow and wide lens writing to good effect”.

 

"The Last Ones Left Alive" Cover-2

Image Via Amazon

Perhaps it’s shouldn’t be as astonishing for the novel to get a film adaptation, but I can’t help but be blown away considered it was published by Tinder Press just a month ago on March 7, 2019.

Treasure Entertainment

Image Via Cinando

Screen Daily reports that Treasure Entertainment has bought film rights. Producer Rebecca O’Flanagan said in a statement that:

From my first read, I was struck by the visual nature of the book and could immediately see that it was a story that has huge potential to hit international screens with iconic and far-reaching success.

So far it’s not known who will be involved in the project. Davis-Goff is said to be “creatively involved” but will not write the screenplay. That makes sense, considering that Totally Dublin reports that “Davis-Goff has signed a two-book deal with publisher Tinder Press, so horror fans can expect another page-turner in the near-future”.

What are you more excited for: the film adaptation or the sequel novel?

 

 

Featured Image Via The Gloss Magazine

Britney Spears wearing angel wings performing on stage at Planet Hollywood, LV

Britney Spears Developing Feminist Fairytale Musical!

Britney’s coming to Broadway! In this article for the BBC Britney Spears revealed she will be developing a new musical featuring a feminist spin on old fairytales. The title of the play will be A One More Time, centering on a book club attended by various fairy tale princesses. Their lives are turned upside down when a rogue fairy godmother brings them a copy of The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan and makes them question their decidedly un-feminist roles.

 

Britney Spears dressed in a white, winged costume, standing on stage singing to an audience
Photo by Matt Baron/BEI/REX/Shutterstock (4705528u)

The musical will be set to numerous pieces of music from Britney Spears, including Baby One More Time, Toxic, and Oops I Did It Again. The piece is described as a ‘feminist jukebox musical’ and Spears said she’s very excited to bring it to the stage. The show will make its debut in Chicago later this year, before moving to New York in 2020.

 

Featured Image Via BBC

Marsha P. Johnson

17 Quotes from LGBTQ+ Trailblazers

It’s Pride month!

 

Now is the time for freedom, celebration, liberation, and love! The LGBTQ+ community has fought hard (and is still fighting) against societal and systemic oppression every single day (especially the Transgender community; here’s a list of all the lives that have been lost in 2018 alone).

 

This month is a time to celebrate how far we’ve come, to acknowledge the oppressions and inequalities that are still so prevalent, and to keep marching toward and fighting for the revolution we need.

 

It is also a time to recognize and remember the activists who got us here. We wouldn’t have rights, Pride, or any of the freedoms we get to experience day-by-day if it weren’t for their bravery, selflessness, and perseverance. 

 

Here are seventeen quotes from incredible activists who paved the way!

 

Marsha P. Johnson:

Now they got two little nice statues in Chariot Park to remember the gay movement. How many people have died for these two little statues to be put in the park for them to recognize gay people? How many years has it taken people to realize that we are all brothers and sisters and human beings in the human race? I mean how many years does it take people to see that? We’re all in this rat race together!

 

Harvey Milk:

If a bullet should enter my brain, let that bullet destroy every closet door.

 

Laverne Cox:

It is revolutionary for any trans person to choose to be seen and visible in a world that tells us we should not exist.

 

James Baldwin:

Everybody’s journey is individual. If you fall in love with a boy, you fall in love with a boy. The fact that many Americans consider it a disease says more about them than it does about homosexuality.

 

Barbara Smith:

Remember, goals are stars to steer by, not sticks with which to beat ourselves.

 

Audre Lorde:

When I dare to be powerful, to use my strength in the service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid.

 

Bayard Rustin:

When an individual is protesting society’s refusal to acknowledge his dignity as a human being, his very act of protest confers dignity on him.

 

Andrea Gibson:

It is untrue that bravery can be measured by a lack of fear. It takes guts to tremble. It takes tremble to love.

 

Barbara Gittings:

As a teenager, I had to struggle alone to learn about myself and what it meant to be gay. Now for [48] years I’ve had the satisfaction of working with other gay people all across the country to get the bigots off our backs, to oil the closet door hinges, to change prejudiced hearts and minds, and to show that gay love is good for us and for the rest of the world too. It’s hard work—but it’s vital, and it’s gratifying, and it’s often fun!

 

Jennicet Gutiérrez:

Immigrant trans women are 12 times more likely to face discrimination because of our gender identity. If we add our immigration status to the equation, the discrimination increases. Transgender immigrants make up one out of every 500 people in detention, but we account for one out of five confirmed sexual abuse cases in ICE custody. The violence my trans sisters face in detention centers is one of torture and abuse. The torture and abuse come from ICE officials and other detainees in these detention centers. I have spoken with my trans immigrant sisters who were recently released from detention centers. With a lot of emotional pain and heavy tears in their eyes, they opened up about the horrendous treatment they all experienced. Often seeking asylum to escape threats of violence because of their gender identity and sexuality, this is how they’re greeted in this country. At times misgendered, exposed to assault, and put in detention centers with men.

 

Frida Kahlo:

I used to think I was the strangest person in the world but then I thought there are so many people in the world, there must be someone just like me who feels bizarre and flawed in the same ways I do. I would imagine her, and imagine that she must be out there thinking of me too. Well, I hope that if you are out there and read this and know that, yes, it’s true I’m here, and I’m just as strange as you.

 

Sylvia Rivera:

I was a radical, a revolutionist. I am still a revolutionist…I am glad I was in the Stonewall riot. I remember when someone threw a Molotov cocktail, I thought, “My god, the revolution is here. The revolution is finally here!

 

Martina Navratilova:

I never felt I had anything to hide. I never felt being gay was anything to be ashamed of, so I never felt apologetic. I didn’t have issues with it, didn’t grow up with any religion, so I didn’t have any religious, you know, issues to deal with as far as homosexuality is concerned. So, I accepted it very easily. For me, it wasn’t that big a deal.

 

Mabel Hampton:

I, Mabel Hampton, have been a lesbian all my life, for 82 years, and I am proud of myself and my people. I would like all my people to be free in this country and all over the world, my gay people and my black people.

 

Christine Jorgenson:

Everyone is both sexes in varying degrees. I am more of a woman than a man.

 

Brenda Howard:

Bi, Poly, Switch—I’m not greedy, I know what I want.

 

Janet Mock:

Self-definition and self-determination is about the many varied decisions that we make to compose and journey toward ourselves…It’s okay if your personal definition is in a constant state of flux as you navigate the world.

 

 

via GIPHY

 

via GIPHY

 

 

Featured Image Via Famous Biographies

Cat yawn

‘Cat Person’ Author Speaks out About Real-Life Inspiration for the Viral Short Story

This past December, a 4,000-word short story took the internet by storm when it was published in The New Yorker. The story is titled Cat Person, and details the trials of twenty-year-old college student Margot as she meets and briefly dates thirty-four-year-old Robert.

 

The all-too-realistic piece of fiction showcases Margot throughout the many quick-changing stages of a blooming, new relationship: the excitement, the giddiness, the butterflies of a growing new crush, the fantasies about everything this relationship could possibly grow into, all the way through unto the grounding realization that this person is not at all who you’d hoped they were.

 

*** SPOILERS AHEAD***

 

The rose colored glasses always begin to fade, and, when they do, Margot realizes Robert is not someone she wants to see. And, by the time everything’s progressed to their first (and only) sexual encounter, Margot’s already realized that she’s not at all attracted to this stranger of a man. She feels repulsion towards him, but doesn’t know how to stop, seeing as sex has already been initiated and they are well in the midst of it all. Margot allows her mind to drift off so she can “just get it over with” while Robert does what he wants until he’s finished:

 

…she felt like a doll again, as she had outside the 7-Eleven, though not a precious one now—a doll made of rubber, flexible and resilient, a prop for the movie that was playing in his head.

 

She ends their relationship shortly after, telling Robert she’s not interested and asking him to stop texting her. The story ends months down the line when Robert gets drunk at Margot’s go-to bar, then spends the remainder of night verbally harassing her via text messages, starting with:

 

“Hi Margot, I saw you out at the bar tonight. I know you said not to text you but I just wanted to say you looked really pretty. I hope you’re doing well!”

“I know I shouldnt say this but I really miss you”

 

And quickly escalating to and ending with:

 

“Answer me”

“Whore.”

 

This story spoke to millions of women of all ages who couldn’t help but see themselves in Margot. The societal expectations placed upon women and girls to always be appeasing, to never come across as difficult, and to never anger or upset the man you are in bed with are an unmanageable weight to bear. This story spread to such immense popularity because it worked to shine a light on the ways in which we are taught that consent always looks like x, y, or z. And that, if you agreed to the encounter initially, there’s no backing out; we are taught to believe that you cannot revoke your yes.

 

I don’t think I, personally, know any women (myself, included) who haven’t been in this exact situation multiple times over the years. Nights that end this way always feel like they’re surrounded by this foggy cloud of discomfort, fear, disappointment, dissociation, and disgust (both with them and with yourself). It’s scary to be alone with someone you don’t know very well, and feel just completely stuck inside their house with no real way out. You never want to be rude by asking to leave, and you also don’t want to anger them for fear of how they might react.

 

It’s the sort of situation where your heart races and your palms sweat and you feel yourself quickly weighing out all of your options until you, eventually, decide that, well, it’s already pretty late and, if you just stick it out until morning, you can go home and shower and pretend it never happened. This way, you avoid any awkward or scary confrontations, and ensure they’re feelings remain unhurt while you just mime your way through the rest of the evening; letting your thoughts wander somewhere else, to some far-off place until it’s all, finally, over. (It doesn’t even have to be a stranger from some Tinder date; we can all-too-often find ourselves ignoring uncomfortable or coercive behavior from people we are already in committed relationships with, allowing them to do what they want under the guise of being in love and being too afraid to rock the boat.)

 

This situation is such a commonality within the dating-sphere, it’s no surprise that author Kristen Roupenian drew from her own personal, real-life experiences to create this story. Roupenian spoke to The Times earlier this week, opening up about her own Cat Person for the very first time.

 

It all started when Roupenian, who had spent many years in a long-term committed relationship, found herself single at thirty-five for the first time since she was in her twenties:

 

When I was 26 and dating, I was such a mess and everything was terrible. I thought now I would be a mature adult and wouldn’t screw up and would understand when people are garbage right away. But instead I felt just as smacked by it and just as confused…I went on a date, it went poorly, and we got in a fight. And that’s alright, but I thought, ‘I’m 35, how did I make this mistake? How did I misread someone so completely?

 

The story grew to success seemingly overnight, and resulted in Roupenian landing a two-book deal with Scout Press, including a collection of short-stories set to release in 2019 and a currently untitled novel.

 

The success was by no accident, however. The story resonated, and still resonates, with people across the board.

 

Dating is never as easy as any of us hope it’s going to be. And, it can be difficult when you’re meeting all of these people to not feel tired of it all, and just ready to settle down with the next semi-charming, borderline-compatible adult human you stumble across. But, once you’ve already begun to force a connection with someone and convince yourself of it’s sustainability, it can be nearly impossible to come to terms with how you genuinely feel, walk out, and leave the situation behind you.

 

Roupenian went on to tell the Times about her own views surrounding the dating culture our society has built:

 

I think that young women in particular feel they have to manage and control and soothe and charm and weave this magic around men…The truth is, most people are not the right person for you, and the person who is the right person for you will still not be a perfect human being.

 

Since the Cat Person publication, Roupenian has learned she was never really alone in this thinking. Women all over have shared their own stories of uncomfortable dates that have ended in aggression, shame, and coercion.

 

I only hope that, now that a light has been shone on the aspects of dating and consent that before we had only ever been told to deal with and ignore, we can finally begin to see a shift in what we do and do not consider normal, healthy, and okay. 

 

In the meantime, we can continue sharing our stories. We can acknowledge and find comfort in the autonomy of our own bodies, and the fact that no one, no matter what their previous relationship to us may be, is allowed to steal that from us. We can refuse to accept the things that feel uncomfortable, scary, or harmful, and not feel any embarrassment, guilt, or shame in vocalizing that. We can understand and accept our own imperfect humanness, and work on erasing both our desire to mold and shift others’ views of us and our impossible desire to never disappoint.

 

We can keep standing up and speaking out. 

 

 

 

Featured Image via Sykesville Veterinary Clinic