Tag: Feminism

This 2021 Calendar Highlights the Best Ruth Bader Ginsburg Fan Art

Brought to you by the independent book publisher, Sourcebooks, The Legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg Wall Calendar is a collection of masterful art, by women around the world, honoring the renowned Supreme Court justice. With style, humor and a feminist flair, this 2021 wall art calendar is not just for those who wish to continue Ginsberg’s fight for women’s rights, but for pioneers of equality everywhere.

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Scarlett Johansson as ‘Bride’ in New Adaptation of Frankenstein

Johansson is playing Bride of Frankenstein, twisting the character in a different direction from James Whale's 1935 film adaptation, and giving the character a spotlight she's never received before.

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In Defense of Antoinette Cosway Mason, the Original Mrs. Rochester

That moment when you’re walking down the aisle and then find out that your groom was not only already married the entire time you were dating, but had his wife stuffed in the attic WHILE YOU WERE LIVING IN THAT SAME HOUSE. Right? No? Exactly, no. Because no one with a bare-bones sense of humanity would actually do that. I’m sending that poor woman a fruit basket with a key hidden under the pineapple, an escape map of the Rochester grounds, and a machete in case she wants to get revenge on her way out.

Here you go, love, via Pinterest

Before I found out about the existence of Wide Sargasso Sea (which has remained on my TBR for far too long), the “woman in the attic” storyline within Jane Eyre, framed by our male lead as some kind of terrible misunderstanding where he is the victim (*sighs in fucboi recognition*), gave me the heebie-jeebies for more reasons than the ones in plain sight. Mr. Rochester does not stop at duplicity, lying, or even the eye-popping, mind-boggling cruelty of imprisoning his spouse in an attic; he is violently and arrogantly ignorant, plagued by Victorian imperial entitlement, and, in plain English, thoroughly dehumanizing his wife.

If Antoinette Cosway Mason—her name before Edward Fairfax Rochester pulled the classic colonial gargoyle move of changing a creole woman’s name into something more English—had been of fine, stout mental health when she got married, she could have understandably hit her breaking point after her marriage. Victorian British repression, the war against the mythical female hysteria, and the iron fist of colonialism with all its layers (elitism, violent racism, rampant sexism) are the true forces behind the making of “the woman in the attic”—nameless, mad, villain. So much gaslighting my head hurts.

Listen to the queen, via Huffington Post UK

Mental Health Day is coming up. So, if you find Mr. Rochester as problematic as I do, humor me for a moment, and let’s speculate: what would have happened if Mr. Rochester had not been an imperial-minded, densely patriarchal, oppressive fucboi with severe allergies to accountability? Well, we’d be talking about a whole new character. Let’s give Antoinette a better partner: what would he look like? Let’s study the facts first.

Matchmaker mode, via Gifer

As of European imperialism, mental health in people of color has developed a branch particular to being under the boot of the colonizer. Every subject of the British empire who was not born on British soil to a completely white family and raised under British customs, was subject to a viciously layered form of oppression. We’re talking about a strong cocktail of dehumanization (“your life is of no value/less value than European lives” and quite literally “you’re not actually human”), powerlessness (“you do not nor will ever make the rules here”), abuse (“your purpose in life is to be used by others”), marginalization (“don’t forget this is not your country, stay on the sidelines and take the scraps”), and invisibility (“justice, laws, and protection do not apply to you”); take a moment to truly put yourself in these shoes, and you will need no further explanation as to why I maintain that Antoinette did not need a complicated family background to have become mentally ill.

She does, however, also have a traumatic family history; as per Wide Sargasso Sea, Antoinette Cosway Mason’s childhood includes sinking into poverty, an abusive stepfather, losing a sibling, losing a home, becoming separated from her mother, and witnessing her mother’s mental downfall due to financial and family struggles. Antoinette was also privy specifically to Englishmen taking advantage of vulnerable local women, as this was the reason why her mother acquired the English surname Mason in a second desperate marriage.
Upon marrying Rochester, Antoinette faces a blackmailer demanding money and threatening to destroy her reputation, and a cheating husband who flaunts his affairs and starts calling her Bertha? (Run, girl). Her marriage falls apart, she is an orphan, and (cherry on top) is shipped to England, where she knows no one. Enter attic arrest.

An-toi-nette, Roch. Say it with me, via Cheezburger

So, now that I have left you with some empirical context and stepped aside to drill a hole into my punching bag (which I labeled “Empires of the World”), let’s get back to the creative portion of this article: if I could have my way and put a different dude in Antoinette’s path that was loving, supportive and actually helpful, what would this person look like? Do you feel a list coming? I do.

1. Support, support, support

Antoinette has had a difficult life, and aren’t relationships supposed to be a kind of safe haven? The right person (let’s call them Human Jollywoke—Hugh, for short) would know this and maybe reassure Antoinette that she is no longer in that same turbulent place that was her childhood. She is safe now and she has a friend.

Couch cuddles, via Design You Trust

2. Thou shalt not gaslight

You don’t get to hit someone over the head with a (metaphorical) lead pipe and then complain that they’re on the ground. They’re on the ground because you hit them. Maybe if Rochester had asked Antoinette (not Bertha, DAMN IT) why she was upset, he might have realized that he was the one being a crapper.

Go into the accountability, Roch, via Matrix Harmonics

3. Awareness is sexy.

If Mr. Jollywoke was English, he would be aware of his privilege and use it for good. He would not leave Antoinette stranded in a sea of racism and nonexistent opportunities, but would help amplify her voice in their social circles, and walk by her side as a person who respects her. Mr. Jollywoke would not act like Antoinette is crazy when she points out that proper English ladies think less of her for being creole. He would listen to her, do his best to understand her, and use his influence to help empower her.

I gotchu, babe, via Pinterest

4. To diagnose or not to diagnose

Some of those who have studied Jane Eyre from a clinical perspective have come to the conclusion that Antoinette exhibits symptoms of Huntington disease. I personally don’t know if I buy it (see the aforementioned lead pipe), but I’m not above finding myself in the wrong. If she did develop Huntington disease at some point during her traumatic life, the answer was NEVER to have her husband tie her to a chair and lock her away from humanity. A clinical label is not a “certifiably crazy” stamp, but an invitation to take special care. I still hold the belief, though, that Antoinette’s only illness was being a traumatized creole woman in a consistently retraumatizing living situation.

Armor up, Antoinette, it’s a bumpy ride, via Design You Trust

5. Death already did us part because you are dead inside

It was too common a tale in colonial West Indies for European men to marry local women of white-enough appearance and upbringing, the result often being humiliation and abuse and a lot of men taking advantage of vulnerable situations. Mr. Jollywoke would be someone with no interest in silencing, taming, or stashing Antoinette away. Ideally, Hugh would have a healthy enough self-esteem to consult Antoinette on where they would live and what kind of a role she would have in their married life.

‘Cause girls just want to have fundamental human rights, via Picslyrics

In honor of Mental Health Day, please remember to do your part in crushing the systems that keep, in the words of George Orwell, some people “more equal than others.” Also, remember that red flags are real, and that they exist to keep you out of relationshits. Isolating and controlling someone’s access to the world are some of the early signs of an abusive relationship, so please please please call a friend or a domestic violence hotline if you fear for your life. Never forget you are the full weight of an Antoinette; it is no one’s right to make you a Bertha.

 

featured image via Khambay’s Words, Words, Words

Iman Vellani to Play First Onscreen Muslim Superhero- ‘Ms. Marvel’

Disney Plus brings its newest Marvel Studios' superhero to the screen with Canadian actress Iman Vellani to play Khamala Khan on Ms. Marvel. 

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The Kind of Thinkers Who Write Books and Get Censored (An Introduction)

Let’s not forget that book banning is, fundamentally, conversation banning. A book gets banned when someone with power deems it dangerous, and it is only deemed dangerous when the thoughts dripping through the pages threaten a comfortable yet questionable, well-enough-rooted institution. So, one of the most sensible ways of honoring forbidden literature is to continue the tradition of feeding uncomfortable yet necessary conversations, and partaking in them.

So, in celebration of Banned Books Week, I hereby give you a drop’s worth of some of the current thought leaders around the world—authors, activists, visionaries, and public officials— whose discourse is worth researching for anyone with even the mildest commitment to human evolution. Not all of them have written books, but plenty of them have, and all of them are serving the thoughts that banned books are made of.

 

  1. Nawal El Saadawi
    An Egyptian writer, physician, and psychiatrist, Nawal El Saadawi has dedicated half a century to peeling back the layers of patriarchal thought, and advocating for women’s rights. She has honed in on the topic of female circumcision, but nowhere near stopped at that; her ceiling-shattering feminist rhetoric and refusal to conform to oppressive class and gender norms have gotten her exiled, censored, imprisoned, and pilloried throughout her life. Thoroughly self-educated and an extraordinary modern thinker, El Saadawi has written in almost every genre and has been published in at least thirteen languages. Her autobiography, A Daughter of Isis (not to be confused with ISIS), is a detailed account of her early life and involvement in social freedom struggles.
Nawal El Saadawi mid-schooling a group of dudes in Tahrir Square, via Sampsonia Way

 

2. Hoda Katebi
A twenty-three-year-old advocate for education and an ethical revolution in the fashion industry, Hoda Katebi is one of the notable young activists that makes me proud to be a millennial. Officially labeled a “writer, community organizer, and creative educator” on her website, this Chicago-based Iranian-American is not only a major mouthpiece for garment workers’ rights, but also a fearless liberal voice in regards to modern Muslim identity, and against military regimes. She is astonishingly fashionable (a detail that is only relevant due to the fact that she works in fashion), so if you look through her Insta feed, you’re likely to gather outfit inspiration. Or, you could check out her book Tehran Street Style, a photographic compilation of some of the best dressed men and women in the political and fashion capital of Iran.

Hoda Katebi’s plaid game, via Glamour
Hoda Katebi in a SCARF, via Chicago Magazine
Hoda Katebi with Hasan Minhaj, via Vogue

 

3. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
One of the modern queens of feminist and anti-racist literature, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is a prodigious master of activism through storytelling, and it would seem she has become so intentionally. In her Ted talk “The Danger of a Single Story,” she discusses the power of stories in creating biases, ideas, and conceptions about people—racial and gender biases being no exception. Her feminist rhetoric is inclusive and intersectional, and her representations of the world so real, you can pick them up and pin them on your bulletin board next to your polaroids. So far, she has written six books, including her wildly famous We Should All Be Feminists and Americanah.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on The Daily Show, via Comedy Central

 

4. Sarain Fox
An indigenous Canadian dancer and artist as well as an activist, Sarain Fox’s involvement in social and environmental issues boils down to a concept she has coined as reconciliACTION. Her mission is fundamentally rooted in seeking truth as a bridge towards sustainability and reconciliation of the peoples who inhabit her native Canada, aboriginal or otherwise. She uses her artistic platform to facilitate necessary dialogue between original populations and the descendants of European colonists.

Sarain Fox speaking with Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau, via Working it Out Together

 

5. Paola Mendoza
Author of the recently published Sanctuary (in addition to her 2013 novel The Ones Who Don’t Stay), Paola Mendoza is a major mouthpiece for human rights, particularly in the context of immigration. Mendoza has so far co-founded the Women’s March, written two social commentary novels, risen in her personal life from gang member to civically engaged activist, directed bilingual films, and advocated for fair trade clothing production. Mendoza is nothing short of a superhero.

Paola Mendoza advocating for cruelty-free wear, via Fair Trade Certified

I’m going to go ahead and reiterate that these are a handful—a starting point, if you will, to an educational journey into forward-thinking literature and discourse. Start right here, but once you get to that rabbit hole—yes, that one—take it. For God’s sake, go down that rabbit hole.

Featured Image via The Joplin Globe