Tag: Farms

5 Worst Horror Book Covers

Halloween is such a great season for scares, but what’s really scary is that a whole team approved these book covers for publication. I don’t know if these books are good, but I do know if I pulled any of them off a shelf they’d go right back there. Caution—they get increasingly stupid as you go down the list.

 

I’m So Scared… I guess…

 

Image via Too Much Horror Fiction

 

Is that a German shepherd? Even if it’s supposed to be a wolf, I’ve got some questions. Firstly, is this an entire book about a dog being evil or something? Putting aside the fact that ALL DOGS ARE GOOD, what can one dog actually effectively terrorize? A small colony of rabbits? Not to be dark, but hit that mangy upstart with your car and book over. I know I’m ignoring the elephant in the room, and sure, the doll’s at least broken, but I’m more alarmed by the fact that someone had a ceramic doll with a cheap weave. And are we sure the dog isn’t doing us a solid? That thing looks possessed.

 

 

Who is She?

 

Image via Spine Cracker

 

Not sure where to start. What’s that over the baby’s crib anyway? It’s not a mobile. Is it just a string of beads the size of oranges? Does being dead allow you to replace a bead with your head? It’s a specific power, but I guess I wouldn’t say no if someone offered it. Again, though, I’m ignoring the most mind blowing part. The tagline. I’m actually quaking, though I don’t think the fear of inconsistencies is the kind of terror they were going for. Listen. Listen to me. Look at that hair. Decadent? Decadent?!?! She doesn’t even have conditioner and they’re describing her as ‘so decadent?’ Seductive! I feel like there’s a lot to unpack, but I’m at a loss for words. Why is she balding?

 

 

Illustration is My Passion

 

Image via Horror Novel Review

 

They really did Stephen King like that. Stephen King! Say it with me. Respect. Genre. Fiction. What’s even going on here? The floating face is bad. I feel like someone needs to say that. His clothes are shredded, although maybe his jeans started distressed anyway. He’s not scratched up though! Whatever mauled him was like… panther attack, but make it fashion. I mean, it tells you nothing about the book, or at least, it doesn’t say anything to me, not having read it. But it goes further than that, and actively confuses me. What’s the threat? Witchcraft? Werewolves? He’s screaming but he hasn’t got so much as a scratch.

 

 

Wait a Second

 

Image via Good Show Sir

 

American Gothic, but like, a skeleton and also worse. But wait. What’s that there? Does the skeleton man… have a lobster claw? I’ve got to be honest, I’ve got no idea on this one. It’s like the Flying Dutchman, but in Michigan? I don’t know anything about lakes, but the internet says that they don’t have lobsters, so what, is this an oceanic curse that was like, you know what? I need to see the tulip festival. I now know about twice as much about Michigan as I used to. I still have no idea what’s going on. The barn has ghost crayfish? Something about that skull looks wrong, if I’m real.

 

 

Best Idea Ever

 

Image via Twitter

 

To be a fly on the wall in this pitch meeting. “Alright, hear me out: quicksand, but it’s sexy.” I mean the slime, the nudity, I’m not sure if they’re going to hang that guy or if he’s into it, and are those swamp monsters in the background? Skeletons? I just realized the naked woman has a sword. Is she beheading zombies in that getup? She’s like, sure this dress is see through, but if I’m going to effectively machete supernatural horrors, I need to be wearing LESS clothing. I feel like ‘sucking’ is also a little silly of a word if you want us to take this threat seriously. And what does it do? Follow you around trying to absorb you?

 

 

Featured Image via Wallpaper Access 

Explore The Natural World With These Wildlife Recommendations!

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most—just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s picks are wildlife recommendations to immerse yourself in the natural world. Dig in!

 

 

5. ‘Texas Reptiles and Amphibians’ by James Kavanagh

 

image via amazon

 

Texas Reptiles & Amphibians by James Kavanagh is a handy new guide for reptile lovers in Texas. The diverse habitats of Texas—swamps, marshes, pine forests, rocky hills, mountains, deserts and prairies—combined with its central location where species from the east, west and Mexico converge, make it a prime destination to find and study reptiles and amphibians. This portable folding guide includes illustrations and descriptions of 140 species and a back-panel map featuring some of the state’s top nature viewing hot spots. A handy field reference and the perfect take-along guide for visitors and nature enthusiasts of all ages.

 

4. ‘Wildling’ by Isabelle Tree

 

image via Amazon

 

Wildling by Isabelle Tree chronicles what happens when 3,500 acres of farmland are returned to nature and what happens when the wilder world overtakes the farm. For years Charlie Burrell and his wife, Isabella Tree, farmed Knepp Castle Estate and struggled to turn a profit. By 2000, with the farm facing bankruptcy, they decided to try something radical. They would restore Knepp’s 3,500 acres to the wild. Using herds of free-roaming animals to mimic the actions of the megafauna of the past, they hoped to bring nature back to their depleted land.

 

3. ‘Make a Home for Wildlife’ by Charles Fergus 

 

image via Amazon

 

Make a Home for Wildlife helps you see your property in new ways and is the resource you need to take the sometimes daunting steps to improve the quality of your land. Focusing on the eastern US from Canada to Florida and west to the Great Plains, this book describes basic habitat types—forest, shrublands, grasslands, and wetlands—and highlights over 150 select native and introduced trees, shrubs, and plants, explaining how they are used—or not—by wildlife. The book includes more than 100 profiles of prominent and interesting species of insects, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and mammals with information on animals and their habitat needs. Large and small mammals, resident and migratory birds, and insects are covered. Fergus relates stories of landowners who have made habitat in different states and regions in different ways.

 

2. ‘Ohio Wildlife’ by Amalia Celeste Fernand 

 

image via amazon

 

Ohio Wildlife by Amalia Celeste Fernand is a great fun book for kids and adults. Have you ever wondered where frogs go in the winter or how to identify a bird? Do you enjoy taking walks in the woods and want to learn more about the wildlife in your backyard? Then kids and adults, this book is for you! Unique coloring pages feature Ohio wildlife with information that is formatted like a guide book. Find out about animal tracks and scat, life cycles, diet, and habitat. Increase your nature knowledge with fun facts, an extensive dictionary, art, science, games, and more. Calling all Ohio Nature Explorers, this is your go-to guide for discovering more about your favorite animals!

 

1. ‘A Field Guide to the Natural World of the Twin Cities’ John j. Moriarty 

 

Image via Amazon

 

A Natural World of the Twin Citieby John J. Moriarty is a handy guide to the wildlife of Minneapolis and St. Paul. John J. Moriarty is a congenial expert on the remarkable diversity of plants and animals in the region’s habitats, from prairies and savannas to woods and wetlands such as swamps and marshes, to fens and bogs, lakes and rivers, and urban and suburban spots. Featuring Siah L. St. Clair’s remarkable photographs, maps, and commentary on natural history, this field guide invites readers to investigate the Twin Cities’ wildlife—familiar and obscure, sun-loving or nocturnal, shy or easily observed. Here are snapping turtles, otters, and Cooper’s hawks, the wild lupines, white water lilies, and sprawling white oaks, among hundreds of species found in the wild, the park, or even the backyard. Including notes on invasive species and a list of references and organizations, this book is a perfect companion and an unparalleled resource for anyone interested in discovering the rich natural world of the Twin Cities.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Amazon