Tag: fantasy

Quotes From ‘Coraline’ To Make You Shiver

The movie adaptation of the classic Neil Gaiman novel Coraline came out eleven years ago today and let’s face it, it’s still creepy. I absolutely love it though, so here are some great quotes in honor of the movie coming out and how it gave us all wonderful nightmares.

 

 

Image via Indiewire

 

 

“We are small but we are many
We are many we are small
We were here before you rose
We will be here when you fall.”

 

“It doth not hurt”, whispered a faint voice, “She will take you life and all you are and all you care’st for, and she will leave you with nothing but mist and fog. She’ll take your joy. And one day you’ll wake and your heart and soul will have gone. A husk you’ll be, a wisp you’ll be, and a thing no more than a dream on waking, or a memory of something forgotten.”

 

 

“And then, in a skittering, chittering rush, it came. The hand, running high on its fingertips, scrabbled through the tall grass and up onto a tree stump. It stood there for a moment, like crab tasting the air, and then it made one triumphant, nail-clacking leap onto the center of the tablecloth.
Time slowed for Coraline. The white fingers closed around the black key….”

 

“We have eyes and we have nerveses
We have tails we have teeth
You’ll all get what you deserveses
When we rise from underneath.”

 

Image via RealRundown

 

Featured  image via Focus Features 

 

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Five Frigid Books for a Warm Winter

On a personal level, I could be more broken up about it being 45 every day in NYC, but there is definitely something not in the spirit of things. Since this winter’s been so warm, get your fix of snow and frost with these books about deep winter.

 

Winterwood – Shea Ernshaw

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We have witches! We have winter choked woods! Actually, witch might be a stretch, but there’s something wrong in the Winterwood, and Nora Walker might have to find it. When a boy comes out of the woods alive after a brutal snowstorm, its secrets become too important to ignore.

 

Shiver – Maggie Stiefvater

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We’ve got another forest, yall, but I admit I’m a sucker for them. Every winter Grace watches the wolves in the woods behind her house, feeling she understands them. They end up being more connected than she could have possibly imagined, and she’s drawn further into their world of curses and winter.

 

The Bear and the Nightingale – Katherine Arden

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Vasilisa has always seen things and other people don’t, but is especially fascinated with the ice demon Frost. When her new stepmother forbids the traditions that appease and strengthen the spirits of the land, it’s up to Vasilisa and the things only she can know to save their crops, their community, and all their lives.

 

East – Edith Pattou

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Rose war wilder than her sisters since birth, and despite her mother’s efforts, can’t be kept from adventure. When a white bear promises her family prosperity if he can take her away, she agrees easily. But the bear is more than he appears, and running away into the cold was barely the beginning.

 

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe – C. S. Lewis

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Image via Seven Miles of Steel Thistles

A classic, but always worth a reread. In a land held in eternal winter by the terrifying White Witch, four children discover a grand destiny and an opportunity to save a world, even if it’s not their own. If you haven’t read it, you absolutely must, and if you have, you still probably should.

 


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Images via Goodreads

Featured image via The National

Best in Science-Fiction

It’s a new week and that means new titles to add to your TBR! This week’s spotlight genre is Sci-Fi, so for all you sci-fi readers or anyone that just loves a good book, this list is for you.

  1. Dead Astronauts by James Vandermeer

Image via Amazon

Dead Astronauts follows three characters, Grayson, Chen, and Morse, who are traveling through forces that can consume them. These three characters also happen to be shapeshifters: amorphous, part human and part extensions of the world. A giant fish, a blue fox, and a language that stretches the limit. The blue fox slips through warrens of time and space and is on a mysterious mission. A homeless woman is haunted by a strange journal, and the fish remembers a past that may not be his own. These three are waging a war against a powerful cooperation. An invisible monster who can’t remember his name and he can’t remember his purpose. There’s also a madman who is haunted by his own creation and wanders the desert lost. This novel has a city without a name that lives in the shadow of an all-powerful company, with the earth at stake.

2. Anyone by Charles Soule

Image via Amazon

Anyone follows a female scientist, from Ann Arbor Michigan, who is searching for a cure for Alzheimer’s disease but ends up finding herself in her husband’s body. This is believed to be a botched experiment, but it ends up changing the world. Twenty years later flash technology allows people to transport themselves into other bodies. The tagline of the company is “Be Anyone with Anyone”. There is also a black-market version where people secretly rent out their bodies for illegal purposes like crime, theft, and drugs. This novel goes from present day to the past as the creator of this flash technology tries to bring the darkness of it to an end.

 

3. The Revisionaries by A.R Maxon

Image via Amazon

The Revisionaries follows Julian, a preacher that preaches in the streets in denim robes and running shoes, but despite his attire is an inspiration for his community. Then the neighborhood mental hospital releases its patients to run amok in the community. Julian meets one of the escapees who speaks of impending doom, and on top of that must face a religious cult that wears red, as well as smoking figure that knows what’s going to happen before it does. Can Julian confront and deal with them all?

 

4. The Pet Project by Amanda Milo

Image via Amazon

The Pet Project follows people on a blue planet in a galaxy that is quite far from our own solar system. The aliens on this planet are tender skinned and intelligent, and they also make great pets. Everyone wants to own one of these pets when they realize they exist. Now these aliens must breed, and someone has to do everything she can to help them breed.

 

5. Accepting the Lance by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller

Image via Amazon

Accepting the Lance follows Clan Korval, as he goes back to the ground after bombing a city. Now he’s on the water planet, Surebleak, where the people are just as untamed as the weather. Korval’s network also needs a complete reset in order to recover from exile. Unfortunately for Korval, the Department of Interior is looking for revenge with Surebleak and Korval’s ship. At the same time, other ships are seeking trade and diving into a trap. People everywhere are in the crosshairs.

 

 

Featured Image via CollageMaker


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5 Books Inspired By Celtic Mythology

Celtic mythology is, by far, one of my favorite things to discuss. Ever. I’ve spent a good chunk of the past two years studying and reading the myths and legends for my own personal research, and I’ve come away wanting to learn even more. The tales are beautiful and the mythical beings–be they deities or other magical creatures–are enthralling. Personally, I think one of the best way to share these myths and legends is through stories like the ones listed below. After all, intrigued individuals will seek out the source material, and they will be able to see what inspired the authors who borrowed from said material.

Here are five books inspired by Celtic mythology.

 

 

1. Daughter of the forest

image via goodreads

This is the first book in Juliet Marillier‘s Sevenwaters series. It should be noted that there is a very heavy romance component to these stories. I also want to add, for the individuals who need this note, that there is a sexual assault scene in this story. This series follows four generations of the Sevenwaters family, a family that has maintained a relationship with the people of the Otherworld–also known as the Fae. The Daughter of The Forest follows Sorcha, a member of the Sevenwaters family and the only daughter of Lord Colum. After his wife’s death, Lord Colum marries an enchantress who curses Sorcha’s brothers. She can only save her siblings by remaining silent as she carries out the will of the Fae and their Queen.  When Sorcha is kidnapped by enemies of her family, it looks like all hope is lost. Will she save her brothers? Read and find out…

2. Hounded

image via goodreads

This isn’t the first time that I have mentioned Kevin Hearne‘s Iron Druid Chronicles in a list. Hearne has a fun way of pulling from different mythologies and making the tales and characters dance together so well that I couldn’t resist putting Hounded on this list. The series follows Atticus O’Sullivan, the last living druid. Atticus runs an occult book shop in Arizona where he sells magic teas to his customers. A sword comes into the picture here, and it proceeds to set off a chain of events that Atticus gets involved in. This series is a blend of urban fantasy and mythology.

3. Heir of Fire

image via goodreads

Heir of Fire is the third book in Sarah J. MaasThrone of Glass series–which is made up of eight books (if you include the novella collection). While Maas has made reference to the Fae and magic in the previous two books, readers get to read about them in more depth in this installment. Readers are introduced to Queen Maeve, a figure who has both mythical and historical roots. Maas also portrays a version of the Fae in both the first book of the series and the final book, and this version falls more into line with the tales that say that the Fae are small beings of nature. She also presents the image of the Fae as simultaneously being godlike while also being lords and ladies, which are portrayals that have also been attached to these beings as well. While there are, technically, two books before this one, this is where the story is truly set into motion.

 

 

4. The cruel prince

image via goodreads

Holly Black‘s The Cruel Prince, and the other books in The Folk of the Air series, has gained a great deal of attention. Our main character, Jude, was still a child when her parents were murdered and she and her siblings were captured by the Fae. Though she was captured by them, Jude still wants to be a part of the Faerie court. In this book, Jude learns that she has the capacity for trickery–a trait that the Fae often possess and can be observed using in tales and myths. Ultimately, Jude will have to put her life on the line to protect her sisters.

5. Lament: The faerie queen’s deception

image via goodreads

Maggie Stiefvater‘s book Lament: The Faerie Queen’s Deception follows Deirdre Monaghan, a young musician who can see faeries. A faerie soldier and a faerie assassin are tracking Deirdre, and their goal is to kill her before her music can attract the attentions of the Fae and weaken the Faerie Queen’s authority over her people. In Irish lore, the Fae would sometimes kidnap mortals who were musically gifted, and this could lead to a number of things happening to the human–sometimes the human would be forced to remain with the Fae forever, and that was one of the kinder fates awaiting said person.

Featured Image Via Get Wallpapers

 

 


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5 Books Inspired by Norse Mythology

Norse mythology is definitely a favorite for many people, and I think we can see why. We have some fantastic deities, like Loki and Thor, who have appeared in comic book serializations for decades now. We have myths that are hilarious enough to hold our attentions. I’m thinking of the Mead of Poetry in particular (a myth that Neil Gaiman retells in his book Norse Mythology). Frankly, these are myths that draw us in because of how epic and enthralling they are in their scope and storytelling. We have warrior gods and goddesses, jötunns, elves, and dwarves – to name but a few.

So it’s only natural then that some authors would refer back to this mythos for inspiration.

Here are five books inspired by Norse mythology.

 

 

 

1. The gospel of loki

 

image via goodreads

Written by Joanne M. Harris, this is the first book in her Loki series which, you guessed it, follows Loki, the trickster god. If anyone is interested, Harris also has a book series simply called Runemarks, which plays with Norse mythology and retells it in a fun, modernized way. The Gospel of Loki retells how the trickster god was recruited by Odin and how he is treated by the other Asgardians. Plus, to make this story even more appealing, it is told from Loki’s sarcastic, snarky point of view.

 

2. Hilda and the troll

 

image via goodreads

You might be familiar with the Netflix adaptation of this adorable graphic novel. Written and illustrated by Luke Pearson, Hilda and The Troll follows Hilda, a young girl who loves to explore and befriend mythical creatures with some distinct Norse roots. She eventually moves to Trollberg, a human city, with her mother, but her adventures only continue in the cityscape with her new friends. The artwork is beautiful and the story is absolutely endearing. While this series is definitely geared towards younger audiences, I am of the mind that all ages can enjoy it. After all, there are little elves, trolls, moving mountains, talking crows, and so much more.

 

3. The Long dark tea-time of the soul

 

image via goodreads

Typically, I try to keep most of the books on lists like these to more recent publications that may not have gotten a great deal of attention. However, Douglas Adams (author of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy) is one of those writers who definitely needs a place on this list. This is the second book in Adams’ Dirk Gently series, which has also recently been adapted into a television series. Dirk Gently is a detective who doesn’t just handle the possible, but also the impossible and improbable. In The Long Dark Tea-Time of The Soul, it comes to Dirk’s attention that a passenger check-in desk at Heathrow airport has disappeared into a ball of light. This is being perceived as an act of god, but this then begs the question: which god?

 

 

4. Hammered

 

image via goodreads

Just to preface, this is the third book in Kevin Hearne‘s Iron Druid series. There are several novels and novellas, and this series is most certainly the gift that keeps on giving in my not-so-humble opinion. These stories follow Atticus O’Sullivan, the last druid who has relocated to Arizona where he runs a bookshop and sells magic teas. Hammered portrays Thor, the god of thunder, as a bully who has ruined lives and killed many. Now, Atticus’ vampire viking friend, Leif Helgarson, enlists the druid to help him get revenge on Thor. This story involves an army of frost giants and battle with the forces of Asgard… with plenty of other pantheons and other mythologies joining the fray.

 

5. the blood-tainted winter

 

image via goodreads

Written by T.L. GreylockThe Blood-Tainted Winter follows Raef Skallagrim, a man who wants to set sail on the ocean, following the sea road. He and his crew wish to be famous and recognized by the gods themselves. Yet Raef’s father and an impending war make it so that Raef must set his dream to the side and answer the call of duty. He must learn to navigate the tides of war while also seeking out revenge. Yet in the end, this will be a war that affects even the gods. This is the first book in The Song of The Ash Tree series.

 

 

Featured image via Deposit Photos


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