Tag: famous

Fictional Libraries We Wish Were Real

Hogwarts LibraryHarry Potter

 

image via pinterest

The Hogwarts library is by far the most well-known when it comes to modern literature and pop culture. Our favorite trio of student wizards often sought out answers to problems from books in the library (magical stones, spells to breathe underwater, regular teenage stuff). Who among us didn’t dream of attending Hogwarts? Or of sneaking into the restricted section of the library under a cloak of invisibility?

 

Image via RadioTimeS

Beast’s Librarybeauty and the beast

 

Image via Telegraph

This library, literally from a fairytale, is as dreamy as you can imagine! Were you as shocked and surprised as bookworm Belle when you first saw the Beast’s library? Who wasn’t jealous of her for being gifted this incredible room? It almost makes the whole hostage thing okay.

 

 

Jedi archives, star wars

 

Image via Scyfilove

Just imagine historical records dating back thousands of years, with maps and geographical archives of entire galaxies. This library literally contained ALL the information about cultures and species spanning centuries of time and space. All of that knowledge in one place sounds like the most complete library to ever exist (in our minds, at least).

 

 

the library, Doctor who

 

Image via Pinterest

 

A planet-sized library containing every book ever written? Sounds like the perfect planet to me. It even has a teleportation system to ensure that you can find your next read with immense speed. I can’t think of a better planet to live in than this one!

Sunnydale high library, buffy the vampire slayer

 

Image via Fandom

The nostalgia is creeping in with this 90’s cult classic. Who didn’t want to have old supernatural texts and medieval weapons in their school library? So many emotional moments happened to the Scooby Gang in this very spot. With a library like that, we definitely wouldn’t mind staying after school to study.

 

Erudite headquarters, The divergent series

 

Image via Amino Apps

Described as a large library with bookshelves covering the walls, the compound is where Erudite members study and work in their expertise: knowledge. Thought to be set in a dystopian version of Chicago’s Millenium Park, we’re pretty sure this tops the “Bean” sculpture when it comes to tourism.

 

Image via Fandom

 

The breakfast club libraryThe Breakfast club

 

Image via Zimbio

The Breakfast Club library was where a brain, an athlete, a basketcase, a princess, and a criminal found out they weren’t so different after all. Not only did this movie give us all the feels, but it sort of made us want to be sent to detention. This one’s less about the books and more about the iconic moments and relationships built amongst them.

Which library do you wish was real? Check out the video in full here.

Featured Image via Fandom


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Three Unknown Stanley Kubrick Scripts Have Been Found

Stanley Kubrick is one of the classic filmmakers. His films have stretched into the public imagination, making him a household name like Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, and Quentin Tarantino. His works have all been genre defining, ushering in new film techniques and inspiring dozens of imitators. His films have included A Clockwork Orange, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Dr. Strangeloveand Eyes Wide ShutNow, twenty years after his death, three new screenplays have been found for unused script ideas Kubrick created during his lifetime but never made into films. These scripts were discovered in London and containing intriguing ideas that speak to much of Kubrick’s personal life as well as his imagination.

 

Image via The Dazed

According to The Dazed,  these scripts were written between 1954 and 1956. During this period, Kubrick was having problems with his then wife, Ruth Sobotka. The screenplays were entitled Married Men, The Perfect Marriage, and Jealously. The first script is the most extensive of the lot, featuring 35 pages of typed script with extra additions of handwritten notes. The second is just seven pages, while the third features a middle ground between the two: 13 pages. These scripts showcase that Kubrick, known for being far more reclusive than most other filmmakers, was working on much unknown work during his period. This is especially important as the 1950s were his least understood part of his career and showcased he was doing much more in private than anyone knew, while also revealing his deeply troubled wedded life.

The scripts enforce this, full of depressing quotes and dark lines about marriage. One quote showcases Kubrick’s attitude at the time quite well. He wrote:

 

“Marriage is like a long meal with dessert served at the beginning. Can you imagine the horrors of living with a woman who fastens herself on you like a rubber suction cup whose entire life revolves around you morning, noon and night?”

 

Yikes. Well that’s certainly a telling quote.

The script’s stories themselves are described as very mediocre and don’t showcase Kubrick’s talent. Kubrick was not a writer but his genius lay in his visual style and approach to filmmaking to make high art out of simple, often trashy, ideas. So, we don’t know what form these films would have taken onscreen. Still, finding these scripts is an incredible discovery for both writing and Kubrick fans, not to mention fans of film in general. Who knows what other projects Kubrick had under his wing that never saw the light of day.

What do you think of this cool discovery? Tell us in the comments!

 

 

Featured Image Via Wikipedia


the canterbury tales

12 Challenging Books Readers Struggle to Finish

As a former English major, I’ve had the misfortune pleasure of coming across some of the most intellectually challenging literary works. Believe me, I love to read and I enjoy challenging myself but when it’s Friday night a week from finals and you’re assigned to read Paradise Lost, no one should fault you for turning to SparkNotes. It just so happens that a lot of literary titles that are put on the pedestal of the best literature in history happen to be complicated AF (though very much worth reading). Yes, no one can deny that Moby-Dick is an American classic, but if you’re telling me you’ve never once yawned or snoozed when you read it, I don’t quite know if I can trust you.

 

From puzzling allusions (including religious references easily missed by people unfamiliar with religious texts) to drawn out plots to overly complicated language, here are 12 literary works that readers have struggled with finishing (let alone understanding).

 

1. The Canterbury Tales | Geoffrey Chaucer

The Canterbury Tales are a collection of the funniest, most complex, and most awarding tales. Chaucer’s use of Middle English language, however, make them hard AF to understand.

 

2. Moby-Dick | Herman Mellville

 

Through the plot of Moby Dick is pretty forward, the actual story, comprised of overly-described prose and complex biblical and mythological references set in a slow pace of it can be particularly hard to grasp. By the last page, you may not understand what just happened.

 

3. King Henry IV | Shakespeare 

While Shakespeare’s witty works comprised of Early Modern English have proven to be difficult for many bookworms to get through, King Henry IV is particularly challenging. There is a lot going on, schemes from left and right, and (in my opinion) it’s not quite exciting enough to be a page turner. Titus Andronicus, on the other hand, is definitely filled with a ton of shocking action to carry you to the finish line.

 

4. Paradise Lost | John Milton

This epic poem is naturally long enough to keep you reading for weeks, but throw in Milton’s obscure language, endless biblical references, and run-on sentences and you may give up half way in.

 

5. Infinite Jest | David Foster Wallace 

With a whopping 1, 079 pages, Infinite Jest is among the longest novels ever written. Known for its unconventional narrative style, this experimental book is filled with complex ideas and language, immense detail, and endless footnotes which will keep you busy for awhile.

 

6. War and Peace | Leo Tolstoy

War and Peace is brilliant. It’s also really long. Period.

 

7. Atlas Shrugged | Ayn Rand

Atlas Shrugged can be eye-opening, but its philosophical and political ideas presented in lengthy monologues can be tough to grasp. The novel use of elements from multiple genres – mystery, romance, and sci-fi – may further confuse readers.

 

8. Ulysses | James Joyce

The most experienced, intellectual, and seasoned reader can come to a crossroads when they pick up this book. It’s widely known as one of the most difficult novels due to Joyce’s layered allusions, stream-of-consciousness technique, and rich vocabulary.  Ironically enough, those same qualities have made it one of the most revered book in history, and many readers who have managed to finish it have argued that the struggle is worth it.

 

9. Finnegans Wake | James Joyce

Like Ulysses, Joyce’s experimental attitude reflects on the pages of Finnegans Wake. Written over the course of seventeen years, it experiments with the English language, incorporates stream-of-consiouness technique, and has a lack of structure that can take readers just as long to finish as the author did writing it.

 

10. Gravity’s Rainbow | Thomas Pynchon

Named by Time Magazine as one of the all-time American novels, Gravity’s Rainbow has managed to dazzle and complex readers since 1923. Its 700-plus pages introduces readers to over 400 characters amidst a backdrop of World War 2 action giving readers a lot to deal with before they reach the last page.

 

11. The Brothers Karamazov | Fyodor Dostoyevsky

If you’ve noticed a theme on this list, it appears that many readers often struggle with literary works containing religious and/or philosophical ideas. The Brothers Karamazov has both. The novel deals with complex ideas, such as right vs wrong, human conscience, moral responsibility and other religious matters written over the course of 700-plus pages, enough the challenge many readers.

 

12. The Bible

One of the most widely read books, The Bible contains a series of complex stories written in intricate language whose meanings have lead to various interpretations and debate around the world. Given that stories from the Bible were originally passed along orally, its no wonder that that it can be more challenging for people to read it on paper versus hearing it aloud.

 

 

Let us know if you’ve managed to finish any of these titles and which you’d highly recommend to your fellow readers!

 

Featured image shows illustration from The Canterbury Tales via Three Gold Bees

Matilda reading

17 of the Best Opening Lines in Literature

The opening sentence of a book can determine a lot of things (including whether or not you decide to keep going with said book). It’s the author’s first invitation into a world of their own creation. They can be long, descriptive, run-on sentences that prepare you for everything you’re about to see; laying it all out on the table. Or, they can be short, concise, small, quiet yet poetic sentences; not revealing much, but urging you to read more. Opening sentences stick with you in a way unlike any other quotes because they are forever the first words you associate with reading that specific work. They’re the first things you see when you open the pages to chapter one. (Bonus points: they’re also the sentences you’ve read more than any other sentences if you’re at all like me and like to start re-reading books you love a lot, but never quite get around to finishing your re-reads because there are too many books and so little time.)

 

 

A good opener embeds itself in your memory; arising to your conscious at the most obscure times. They are the lines we scribble in our journals, slur to strangers when we’re tipsy at the bar, recite to ourselves when we’re sleepy on our long commutes home, quote in our poems and wedding vows, tattoo onto our bodies to prove our love of literature, and share with those closest to us in the middle of the night while we bare our souls.

 

And, personally, if there’s one thing I love (almost) as much as some good quotes, it’s lists of good quotes. Yay, words! Yay, opening sentences! Yay, lists!

 

1. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

“It was a queer, sultry summer, the summer they electrocuted the Rosenbergs, and I didn’t know what I was doing in New York.”

 

2. Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon

“A screaming comes across the sky.”

 

3. Cat’s Eye by Margaret Atwood

“Time is not a line but a dimension, like the dimensions of space.”

 

4. Blue Nights by Joan Didion

“In certain latitudes there comes a span of time approaching and following the summer solstice, some weeks in all, when the twilights turn long and blue.”

 

5. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

“It was a pleasure to burn.”

 

6. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

“Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show.”

 

7. The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber

“Forty minutes later he was up in the sky.”

 

8. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson

“We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold.”

 

9. Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides

“I was born twice: first, as a baby girl, on a remarkably smogless Detroit day in January of 1960; and then again, as a teenage boy, in an emergency room near Petoskey, Michigan, in August of 1974.”

 

10. The Waves by Virginia Woolf

“The sun had not yet risen.”

 

11. The Time Machine by H.G. Wells

“The time traveler (for so it will be convenient to speak of him) was expounding a recondite matter to us.”

 

12. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins.”

 

13. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

“All this happened, more or less.”

 

14. Sellevision by Augusten Burroughs

“You exposed your penis on national television, Max.”

 

15. The Trial by Franz Kafka

“Someone must have slandered Josef K., for one morning, without having done anything truly wrong, he was arrested.”

 

16. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

“All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”

 

17. Valley of the Dolls by Jacqueline Susann

“You’ve got to climb to the top of Mount Everest to reach the Valley of the Dolls.”

 

Via Giphy

Via Giphy

 

 

Featured Image via The Reading Room