Tag: fahrenheit 451

Why You Should Read From the Off-Beaten Paths of Your Favorite Authors

Using authors you know to find books you'll love: why reading beyond an author's most famous work can help you find a hidden gem.

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Lizzo Lewks as Iconic Book Covers

I wanted an excuse to think about Lizzo, okay? I’m only human.

Here are six fabulous book covers, and the Lizzo looks that match!

 

 

 

1. The Great Gatsby

 

Image via The American Writers Museum

 

Lizzo in the music video for Tempo/Image via essence

 

2. Catcher in the Rye

 

Image via Amazon

 

Lizzo for Playboy/Image via Brandy Source

 

3. Brave New World

 

Image via Wikipedia

 

Lizzo during her performance at the 2019 MTV TV and Movie Awards/ Image via Spin

 

4. Clockwork Orange

 

Image via Amazon

 

Image via Teen Vogue

 

 

5. 1984

 

Image via Amazon
Lizzo in her album art for Truth Hurts/Image via Out

 

 

6. Fahrenheit 451

 

Image via Slate

 

Lizzo as Ron Burgundy/Image via Youtube

 

 

 

 

 

Featured image via Music in Minnesota 

 

Girl surrounded by books and reading

17+ Short Books You Can Read In One Day

...even if you’re reading this at any other time of the year when you just managed to scrape out a whole day (or two) to read, then it wouldn’t hurt to keep this list in mind…

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The Handmaid's Tale

13 Quotes from Dystopian Novels to Get You Fired Up

For as long as we have been granted freedoms, there have been people fighting to take those freedoms away; this is the most human of cycles. There has never been (and will likely never be, at least not right now) a time when people haven’t had to stand up against the systemic and societal oppression they’ve been forced to deal with everyday.

 

We’ve been warned about what can happen when we allow ourselves to stop caring about the state of the world and the other people inhabiting it by authors since the beginning of time; the entire dystopian genre is centered around it. So, don’t allow yourself to grow sedentary but also don’t grow too fearful; for as many greedy, selfish, oppressive, bad figureheads there are in existence, there are way, way more of us who really do care and move with empathy while fighting for a world of genuine equality.

 

So, take a look at these thirteen quotes from dystopian novels and give yourself that extra push you may need to keep marching forward! 

 

“We were the people who were not in the papers. We lived in the blank white spaces at the edges of print. It gave us more freedom. We lived in the gaps between the stories.”  Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale

 


 

“Every faction conditions it’s members to think and act a certain way. And most people do it. For most people, it’s not hard to learn, to find a pattern of thought that works and stay that way. But our minds move in a dozen different directions. We can’t be confined to one way of thinking, and that terrifies our leaders. It means we can’t be controlled. And it means that, no matter what they do, we will always cause trouble for them.” Veronica Roth, Divergent

 


 

“Did you ever feel, as though you had something inside you that was only waiting for you to give it a chance to come out? Some sort of extra power that you aren’t using – you know, like all the water that goes down the falls instead of through the turbines?” Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 


 

“If liberty means anything at all it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.” George Orwell, 1984

 


 

“There must be something in books, something we can’t imagine, to make a woman stay in a burning house; there must be something there. You don’t stay for nothing.” Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

 


 

“We can destroy what we have written, but we cannot unwrite it.” Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange

 


 

“Of course they needed to care. It was the meaning of everything.” Lois Lowry, The Giver

 


 

“That was when they suspended the Constitution. They said it would be temporary. There wasn’t even any rioting in the streets. People stayed home at night, watching television, looking for some direction. There wasn’t even an enemy you could put your finger on.” Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale

 


 

“Our lives are not our own. We are bound to others, past and present, and by each crime and every kindness, we birth our future.” David Mitchell, Cloud Atlas

 


 

“Tell freedom I said hello.” Lauren DeStefano, Wither

 


 

“But you can’t make people listen. They have to come round in their own time, wondering what happened and why the world blew up around them. It can’t last.” Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

 


 

“Do not let your fire go out, spark by irreplaceable spark in the hopeless swamps of the not-quite, the not-yet, and the not-at-all. Do not let the hero in your soul perish in lonely frustration for the life you deserved and have never been able to reach. The world you desire can be won. It exists.. it is real.. it is possible.. it’s yours.” Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

 


“I may be the last one, but I am the one still standing. I am the one turning to face the faceless hunter in the woods on an abandoned highway. I am the one not running, not staying, but facing. Because if I am the last one, then I am humanity. And if this is humanity’s last war, then I am the battlefield.” Rick Yancey, The 5th Wave

 

 

 

via GIPHY

 

 

 

Featured Image via Romper

Lolita

7 Banned Books That Made Killer Films

The act of banning books, and deciding what people can and cannot read, is one of the oldest acts of censorship in existence; as long as we’ve had books, we’ve had people in power trying to prevent us from reading them. 

 

The ironic thing about banning books, however, is that it usually has an adverse effect, making the books much more popular and well-known than they may have been had no one tried banning them in the first place. The books that are banned are usually the ones that urge readers to question the norm, rebel against injustice, and always stand strong; many of the most beloved pieces of literature were banned at one point or another.

 

But, despite their best efforts, no one can ever get in the way of people reading the books they want to read. These seven banned-books-turned-popular-adaptations prove that and so much more. 

 

 

1. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

 

Fahrenheit 451

Image Via HBO

 

The popular dystopian novel depicting a future in which reading is illegal and all books are burned was banned between the years 2000-2009 due to the burning of the Bible that takes place within the story. 

 

HBO released their movie adaptation May 12, 2018.

 

 

2. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey

 

one flew over the cuckoo's nest

Image Via HBO 

 

This classic novel detailing the fight for power between a man who’s been sent to a mental institution and the dictatorship of the hospital staff has been banned in schools off and on since it’s publication in 1962 for it’s “glorification of crime” and “pornographic language”.

 

The popular adaptation starring Jack Nicholson was released November 19th, 1975.

 

3. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

 

the handmaid's tale

Image Via Harper’s Bazaar 

 

The famed Margaret Atwood novel detailing a future in which women are forced to bear children for elite couples in an America that has been overrun by a Christian, totalitarian government has been banned throughout schools since it’s 1985 release for it’s “graphic, sexual language” and “sacrilegious themes”.

 

The Hulu adaptation aired April 25th, 2018.

 

 

4. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

 

a wrinkle in time

Image Via HuffingtonPost

 

This fantastical story of a young girl as she braves a dangerous journey of good versus evil in a mystical universe has faced controversy it’s 1962 release date due to descriptions of magic and “anti-Christian values”.

 

The film adaptation starring Oprah, Mindy Kaling, Reese Witherspoon, and more was released February 26th, 2018.

 

5. 1984 George Orwell

 

1984

Image Via La Croix

 

This dystopian story detailing a world in which Big Brother is always watching, individualism is nonexistent, and everything is against the law has faced criticism since it’s 1949 release date due to it’s heavy political themes and sexual content.

 

The film adaptation was released December 14th, 1984.

 

 

6. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

 

lolita

via Hollywood Reporter

This controversial novel describing the love affair between antagonist Humber Humbert and his adolescent step-daughter, Lolita, has been banned across the board since it’s 1955 publication for it’s “graphic sexual language” and “inapproriate and disturbing scenarios between an adult man and a young girl”.

 

The Stanley Kubrick adaptation was released June 13th, 1962.

 

 

7. Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

 

Bridge to Terabithia

Image Via Inkoherence

 

This tragically heartbreaking novel describing the friendship between two twelve-year-olds who create a fantastic, imaginary world has been banned since it’s release in 1977 for it’s themes of witchcraft, atheism, and it’s “inappropriate language.”

 

The popular film adaptation starring Josh Hutcherson was released February 16th, 2007.

 

 

Featured Image via Skinzwear