Tag: easter

Alice in Wonderland Rabbit

Five of the Hip-Hoppin’est Rabbits From Literature

Easter’s coming up, and whether or not you get a protected holiday – looking at you Ireland with your two week vacation – there’s something worth celebrating, whether it’s 50% off Easter chocolates come Monday, or famous rabbits in literature. Though at Bookstr, we’re going to celebrate with both!

 

1. Rabbit from Winnie-the-Pooh

 

Rabbit

Image via Basement Rejects

 

Rabbit gets the first slot on our list because of all the rabbits in literature, Rabbit seems the most lazily named. Sure, three other bunnies on this list have Rabbit, or a not-so-subtle reference to rabbits, in their name, but at least they have surnames? Rabbit is just Rabbit. But then again, Piglet is also not so original..

 

2. Peter Rabbit from The Tale of Peter Rabbit

 

Peter Rabbit

Image via The New York Times

 

Peter Rabbit is a fan favorite in this office, but the Hollywood treatment has really put a downer on our love for this bundle of fluff. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a huge fan of James Cordon, but forty-seven seconds of the trailer was enough for me. 

 

3. Peter Cottontail from The Adventures of Peter Cottontail

 

Peter Cottontail

Image via Amazon

 

Another rabbit named Peter, but this one’s surname is Cottontail! How original! I joke, I kid, these are childhood classics that I love and love dearly. This might be the Mandela Effect in action, but I’m convinced that Peter Rabbit and Peter Cottontail are two separate entities in literature, but apparently Peter Cottontail is just a rhyme, and Peter Cottontail doesn’t have any beautiful old-timey illustrations, which is upsetting.

 

4. Literally any character from Watership Down

 

Watership Down

Image via Good Reads

 

I think it’s safe to say that Watership Down is the most famous piece of literature about rabbits. And by that I mean, only about rabbits. If you haven’t read this American classic, you should put it on your list of books to read before you die, because despite the main characters being rabbits, they’re a fully formed culture with their own language including proverbs, poetry, and mythology.

 

5. Bunnicula from Bunnicula: A Rabbit-Tale of Mystery

 

Bunnicula

Image via Amazon

 

Some may say Bunnicula is more Halloween than Easter, but hey, we’re listing famous rabbits in literature, and what list would be complete without my favorite Dracula spin off. The Monroe family finds a bunny at the theatre after their screening of Dracula, and name him Bunnicula. Chester the cat is convinced Bunnicula is actually a vampire, despite his vegan vegetable-juice diet, and attempts to get Harold the dog’s help to save the family from this potential threat. Told from Harold’s perspective, Bunnicula is a wild ride that I absolutely loved as a kid.

 

Honorable mention goes to Nivens McTwisp, The White Rabbit from Alice in Wonderland

 

Featured Image via Another Concept.