Tag: DC

Harley Quinn & Poison Ivy Have Finally Tied The Knot

You didn’t read that wrong, people. DC comic characters Harley Quinn and Poison Ivy were recently married in DC’s Injustice: Year Zero series!

Image via ScreenRant

In the modern comics, Harley and Ivy have been together for a while and it is so great to see the two become life long partners. The two have been a fan favorite OTP. We love to see a liberated Harley, far way from The Joker and his abuse. She set out on her own to create a life for herself, one where she isn’t defined by her relationship but now, where she can truly be herself, have actual friends and a loving relationship.

 

Image via Tumblr

Though their relationship has had some push back, love truly conquered all. The series writer Tom Taylor confirmed that their love has led them to martial bliss. This moment is not only amazing for the characters but for representation as well. To see two, strong, capable women in love and written tastefully is beautiful to see. And we need more of it! So, the gays have truly truly won, folks. We love to see it!

 

 

via GIPHY

 

Featured image via CBR

‘The Batman’ Is Back!

Production on The Batman took a brief hiatus in lieu of Robert Pattinson testing positive for Covid-19 (which was the film’s second delay after it was halted in March due to the pandemic).

Originally scheduled to be released in June of 2021, the first delay pushed The Batman to debut that October. The film’s second delay in production has pushed it even further, now slated to hit theaters in March of 2022.

Image via MovieGasm

Robert Pattinson, Colin Farrel and and Zoë Kravitz were spotted filming the Matt Reeves blockbuster in Liverpool, England. Fans were granted a sneak peek of Kravitz as Catwoman, dressed in the character’s signature black leather garb. Colin Farrel was also seen as The Penguin, complete with prosthetic scar tissue and wrinkles. While a more grounded and realistic depiction of the supervillain (as opposed to Tim Burton’s Batman: Returns, where the character was so grotesquely mutated and deformed that he only had three fingers on each hand), the costume still portrays him in a way that respects the original source.

It’s unfortunately going to be some time before we finally see The Batman, but personally, I’m willing to wait. While I did enjoy Ben Affleck’s portrayal of the Caped Crusader, I’m anxious to see the character once again in a good movie (which has been over eight years now, mind you).

 

featured image via gamesradar

Robert Pattinson’s ‘The Batman’ Pushed to 2022

Robert Pattinson fans were ecstatic to learn that he'd be starring in The Batman. However, their anticipation will have to hold out a little longer, as Warner Bros. has delayed the release date from October first, 2021 to March fourth, 2022 due to the Corona Virus pandemic.

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Are Comics Real Literature?

I recall a conversation that I had with my mother. I just returned from Barnes & Nobles with the final The Walking Dead compendium under my arm, and he asked me how I, an individual she considers quite well read in the classics of literature, can read something intended for children. While that may be a paraphrase of how exactly that interaction occurred, the implication of her inability to understand the value of a comic struck me.

It didn’t take me long to realize why my mother thought this way. She was born in the 60’s, the height of Betty and Veronica, the time when the only place you saw comics were on the magazine rack in a drug store, not amongst the works of great novelists in a bookstore. It was the time of Adam West’s Batman and, as she grew older, Lou Ferrigno’s The Incredible Hulk. In short, comics and comic characters were seen as nothing short of mindless children’s entertainment with nothing substantial to provide a grown adult with. They weren’t taken seriously.

Yet are they taken seriously now? Most definitely. You only have to look at Marvel Studios and see how influential their movies have been to modern pop culture. People openly wept when Tony Stark sacrificed himself at the end of Endgame. People furiously petitioned to shut down Rotten Tomatoes because they gave a negative review to Batman v. Superman. People even started using the “Wakanda Forever” salute from Black Panther as a symbol to celebrate black excellence, influencing the future of an entire political movement. I think it’s safe to say that people take the comic world very, very seriously.

But what about the books? Do those hold the same substance as the movies? Does Marvel Comics have the capacity to elicit the same emotions from their readers as Marvel Studies does with their audience? I believe firmly that the answer is yes. In Hulk: The End, Bruce Banner (and, by extension, the Hulk) is the last survivor of a nuclear holocaust. An old man now, and with only a floating camera left by an alien race to document the demise of the human species to talk to, Bruce aimlessly wanders what’s left of the world. Not only does Hulk: The End provide the reader with a beautiful character study of Bruce Banner, Hulk and the relationship the two have, but it also evokes the legend of Prometheus at the end (I won’t tell you why, though, so you go find the comic online for yourself!)

Image via Dark Age of Comics

Yet are comics books taken as seriously as the movies? While, over the years, the comic book industry has been booming (In 2015, the comic book industry in North America was worth over one billion dollars), there’s still a stigma attached to the medium, especially for the older generations. Despite this, comic books still hold just as much substance as novels, and are, most definitely, literature.

 

featured image via verge