Tag: Coraline

The Top 10 Most Mouthwatering Foods in Children’s Fiction

We’ve all craved a magical food that doesn’t actually exist, or we’ve read about a real food that didn’t live up to the hype of our childhood imaginations. Here are some of the foods (in no particular order) that still seem to appear in my dreams.

 

1. Everlasting Gobstoppers (Charlie and The Chocolate Factory)

 

Willy Wonka with an Everlasting Gobstopper

Image via iCollector

 

There are what feels like hundreds of candies within the walls of Willy Wonka’s factory, all of which sound absolutely mouthwatering. However, everlasting gobstoppers stick out to me because they actually exist. You can go down to your local corner store and buy a box right now if you really wanted to.

But you don’t want to. Because the real everlasting gobstoppers are flavorless little balls of cement. And the fictional ones are, well, fictional.

#JusticeForEverlastingGobstoppers

 

 

2. Fruit From the Toffee Tree (The Chronicles of Narnia)

 

An illustration of the toffee tree

Image via Citizen of Anvard

 

C.S. Lewis doesn’t do the most creative job of describing this treat. The fruit falls from a tree, and it’s described as being “not exactly like toffee – softer for one thing, and juicy – but like fruit which reminds one of toffee.

The tree formed when a toffee candy was planted in the ground in the moment of Narnia’s creation, and it grew at an incredible rate because the song that brought Narnia to life was still clinging to the world.

Must taste pretty good, with an epic backstory like that.

 

3. ‘Eat Me’ Cookies (Alice in Wonderland)

 

'eat me' cookies from Alice in Wonderland

Image via Amino Apps

 

There are a couple of bad side effects when you snack on these magical cookies. In Alice in Wonderland, Alice takes a bite of one these and grows to be about the height of a one-story house.

Yet somehow, that just makes them more tempting. What’s life without a little risk of becoming gargantuan?

 

4. Pasta Puttanesca (a Series of Unfortunate Events)

 

Pasta Puttanesca inspired by 'A Series of Unfortunate Events'

Image via Fiction-Food Café

 

Pasta puttanesca is a very real dish, and something you can order at most Italian restaurants. However, sometimes the way something tastes in reality just can’t compare to the way it tastes in your imagination.

In A Series of Unfortunate Events, the pasta puttanesca serves as a small amount of comfort in the bleak world that the Baudelaire children have found themselves in after the death of their parents. Something about the warm, homey feeling that it provides makes it an absolutely crave worthy dish.

 

5. Green Eggs and Ham (Green Eggs and Ham, obviously)

 

The cover of 'Green Eggs and Ham'

Image via io9

 

Sam-I-Am was pretty insistent about this dish. If someone follows you from a house, to a box, to a tree, to a train, to the dark, to the rain, to a boat just to get you to try a bite of their food then they’re probably insane.

But they probably also have some pretty good eats.

 

 

6. Leek and POTATO sOUP (Coraline)

 

Potato and leek soup

Image via Food Network

 

Coraline isn’t particularly excited by this dish, choosing instead to stick with her frozen mini-pizzas. However, considering the themes of family and parental love in this novel, this soup dish gives off a cozy and homey sort of vibe.

And if someone hands you a warm pot of homemade soup, that someone must love you an awful lot! Certainly more than your eyeless, soul stealing, puppet mom.

 

7. Saffron Tea (Kiki’s Delivery Service)

 

A moment from 'My Neighbor Totoro,' another Studio Ghibli film

Image via Studio Ghibli

 

Studio Ghibli, the Japanese animation studio, has a knack for animating foods in the most delicious looking way possible. This particular gif is from My Neighbor Totoro, as the saffron tea from Kiki’s Delivery Service didn’t make it’s way out of the book.

In the book the tea serves as a reminder of Kiki’s home while her travels become too much to handle. The smell and the warmth remind Kiki of her mother, and the memory helps keep her spirits high while she’s speeding around on her broom.

 

8. Unicorn Blood (Harry Potter Series)

 

A bleeding unicorn from 'Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone'

Image via Sci-Fi Stack Exchange

 

This one is a bit macabre, but there’s something undeniably intriguing about the unicorn blood in the Harry Potter.

The golden trio (plus Draco) are serving detention in the Forbidden Forest with Hagrid, when they stumble upon a pool of shiny silver goo. When they see a shadowy figure knelt over the body of the unicorn, the kids all run away screaming, except for Harry who stumbles over a tree root.

He’s saved by a centaur, the story moves on, and no one even asks for a sip of that shiny, magic goop.

Maybe this is why I never got my Hogwarts letter.

 

9. Magic Beans (Jack and the Beanstalk)

 

Some perfect beans

Image via Tourism Currents

 

If a bag of beans is worth selling your family’s only source of income, they better be some damn good beans.

 

 

10. Giant Chocolate Cake (Matilda)

 

The moment where Bruce Bogtrotter must eat a whole cake in 'Matilda'

Image via Giphy

 

Bruce Bogtrotter is one of literature’s bravest heroes. He’s punished for his humanity (what child wouldn’t try to sneak a piece of cake?) and still emerges triumphant despite all odds.

While this scene can be a bit nauseating, there’s always something enticing about the thought of having a triple layered chocolate cake plopped down directly in front of you.

Plus, you get to dive straight into that sucker fork first.

Might not be such a punishment after all.

 

 

 

Featured image via Simplemost

Coraline

As If It Couldn’t Get Any Creepier, Neil Gaiman’s ‘Coraline’ Is Becoming an Opera

Coraline, the 2002 novel by Neil Gaiman, has already been adapted into a graphic novel, a film, and a musical.  Now the terrifying tale is being turned into an opera.

 

Coraline Opera Creepy

Image Via Barbican

 

This new adaptation of the story is composed by Mark-Anthony Turnage with text written by Rory Mullarky.  Two singers, Robyn Allegra Parton and Mary Bevan, are sharing the title role as it is too taxing for one person to sing more than once a day.  Kitty Whately plays the pivotal role of the mother and Other Mother.

 

The opera largely maintains the creepy aesthetic of the book. The Other Mother still has her big, black button eyes, this time sewn with red thread and worn by the actress through the use of a goggle-like device. The music is similar in both worlds in the story, but it helps set the mood as it takes on a more sinister and distorted quality once Coraline enters the other world.

 

Coraline Opera

Image Via Barbican

 

The production has been rated as suitable for audiences age eight and older. When questioned about whether or not the creepier aspects of the story needed to be toned down, Turnage told The Guardian, “There is a school of thought that says you should protect children from scary stories. I think that’s ridiculous. It’s what growing up is all about.” This largely echoes the sentiment expressed by Gaiman himself in the introduction of the tenth-anniversary edition of the book where he says that being brave doesn’t mean that you aren’t scared:

 

“Being brave means you are scared, really scared, badly scared, and you do the right thing anyway.”

 

Coraline will be at the Barbican in London from March 29th through April 7th.

 

Feature Image Via Stark After Dark

Neil Gaiman

10 Neil Gaiman Quotes to Expand Your Consciousness

Neil Gaiman’s stories are populated by slightly askew things from our world. There are people who are just a little inhuman. Maybe they have buttons for eyes or can summon gold coins in their hands. Or maybe our dreams actually happen in a land ruled over by a singular Sandman.

 

Gaiman’s known for his unrestricted imagination. He’s written books, comic books, and screenplays. As far as matters of imagination go, Gaiman’s the one to listen to. So if you feel your mind can use a bit of expansion, let’s listen to what the master has to say.

 

1. Stories may well be lies, but they are good lies that say true things, and which can sometimes pay the rent.

 

2. People think dreams aren’t real just because they aren’t made of matter, of particles. Dreams are real. But they are made of viewpoints, of images, of memories and puns and lost hopes.

 

3. Most books on witchcraft will tell you that witches work naked. This is because most books on witchcraft were written by men.

 

4. You get what anybody gets – you get a lifetime.

 

5. Picking five favorite books is like picking the five body parts you’d most like not to lose.

 

6. All your questions can be answered, if that is what you want. But once you learn your answers, you can never unlearn them.

 

7. Even nothing cannot last forever.

 

8. Google can bring you back 100,000 answers. A librarian can bring you back the right one.

 

9. He had noticed that events were cowards: they didn’t occur singly, but instead they would run in packs and leap out at him all at once.

 

10. A book is a dream that you hold in your hands.

 

Coraline

Image via Youtube

 

Feature Image Via Hey U Guys

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Infographic: The Scariest Monsters in Literature

Halloween is a time for spooky monsters like the well-known Frankenstein, Dracula, and the Headless Horseman. It’s also a time for scary books. After all, every monster we just mentioned shares one thing in common: a literary heritage.

Books are full of creepy ghouls, ghosts, and monsters, so it’s no surprise that a lot of our Halloween horror inspiration comes from the scary stories on our bookshelves. But how well do you know the scariest monsters in all of literature?

Get into the spirit of Halloween with this awesome infographic from the folks at the UK’s Morph Costumes. All of the classic creeps are there, and they’re all helpfully labeled with a “Scream Score,” which is calculated by evaluating their creepy appearance, supernatural powers, and evil intent. Morph Costumes says that Pennywise, from Stephen King’s It, is the creepiest one of all. Do you agree?