Tag: comedy

Ali Wong’s ‘Dear Girls’ is both Heartfelt and Hilarious

If you’ve spent a lot of time binging on Netflix, you might recognize Ali Wong and her boisterous brand of comedy. She received mainstream acclaim with a pair of comedy specials she recorded in a mini-dress while pregnant: Baby Cobra (2016)  and Hard Knock Wife (2018). She also wrote and starred in a wildly popular Netflix original movie, Always Be My Maybe, last year. Wong’s never been reluctant to share the details of her life onstage (or overshare, depending on how you look at it) and in her first book – Dear Girls: Intimate Tales, Untold Secrets & Advice for Living Your Best Life – Wong’s bringing her swaggering comedic style to the page.

Image via Amazon

Dear Girls is another irreverent and downright filthy piece of comedic writing from Wong. It features gross-out vignettes from her time studying abroad in Vietnam, in which she recounts having to bust out of her comfort zone when presented with a delicacy of fertilized duck embryos.

Wong also recounts her struggle to mainstream success and bombing in front of Eddie Murphy:

I knew Eddie Murphy specifically wasn’t laughing,” Wong writes, “because everyone knows when Eddie Murphy is or isn’t laughing. You could recognize his signature ‘HANH-HANH-HANH’ goose honk anywhere. And that night, there were no geese.

Dear Girls is meant to be somewhat crude and flippant, mainly because that’s just what Wong finds funny. But in between stories about gross Vietnamese breakfasts and teaching readers how to hold a fart in during yoga, Wong also reflects on her position in the public eye. As an Asia American comedian who’s also mom, there are a lot of eyes on her for a lot of reasons.

Image via The Ringer

Convincing an audience that a person who looks like me could be funny and proving to them that I belonged onstage, was a steep uphill battle.

Fans of Wong will welcome this new and, of course, hilarious look into her life. As a comedian who’s never shied away from oversharing, Dear Girls is as boisterous and brash as its author.

Featured image via Parade

Quiz – Which Midsummer Night’s Dream Character Are You?

 

 

Featured image via NY Daily News 

7 Contemporary Adaptations of Classic Novels

Everyone likes an adaptation, and sometimes the best adaptations are underground. Here are seven picks from YouTube, perfect for marathoning, all based on classic novels and set in the modern era. No matter whether you’re a fan of Jane Austin, William Shakespeare, or Charlotte Bronte, there’s something for every classic book lover. Watch away!

 

1. Nothing Much To Do

 

Image via YouTube

 

If you like Much Ado About Nothing, get ready for Nothing Much to Do, an adaptation from New Zealand in vlog format, this time set at Messina High. All the accusations, the threats, and a few serenades on ukulele, this modern adaptation has all the humor and hatred you love, while also featuring a plastic flamingo. A must watch.

Based on Much Ado About Nothing, by William Shakespeare

 

 

2. Autobiography of Jane Eyre 

 

Image via Miss Daydreamer’s Place

 

Fans of Jane Eyre will appreciate the tragedy and measured pace of Autobiography of Jane Eyre. Filmed as a video diary, this series follows nursing student Jane as she leaves school, becomes a governess, and falls for the master of the house. Covering all the original beats of the story with inventiveness and heart, it has all the Gothic appeal of the original. Plus Adele is cute.

Based on Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

 

3. The Lizzie Bennet Diaries 

 

Image via The Hollywood Reporter

A classic, and for good reason. Thorough plotting, well paced character development, and silly costumes make this series compulsively watchable. Elizabeth is very much herself, lovable, judgmental, caringJane is sweet and decisive, Kitty is an actual cat, and Lydia is gleeful and wild. Set in California, Lizzie is a grad student with no interest in marriagemuch to her mother’s chagrin.

Based on Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austin

 

 

4. In Earnest

 

Image via Pinterest

Seriously, this web series is good. I’m not joking. You might say I’m Earnest, but honestly, who isn’t? Oscar Wilde’s classic is reimagined probably exactly as he would have wanted itwith everyone confused and overdressed. At just fifty episodes, it’s an excellent binge watch, and relatable, at least if you’ve ever wondered how to propose to someone you’ve given a false name.

Based on The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

 

5. Emma Approved

 

Image via Hollywood.com

In this adaptation, Emma runs a PR firm with her brother-in-law, George Knightly. Some great parties, some terrible decisions, and outrageous confidence make this a fun and lighthearted series, despite any low moments. Fans of Austin will be thrilled, and if you’re not yet obsessed, you will be.

Based on Emma by Jane Austin

 

 

6. Anne With An E 

 

Image via Kickstarter

If you can’t wait to return to Green Gablesor visit for the first timeGreen Gables Fables is a delightful and heartwarming take on the classic story. Never discouraged, Anne’s passion and creativity make this series sing, and even at one-hundred-fifty episodes (the longest on this list), it seems too short.

Based on Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery

 

7. Jules and Monty

 

Image via YouTube

This adaptation of Shakespeare’s classic tragedy may have slightly less murder, but it has just as much tragedy as the original. The clash between two warring fraternities reaches new heights. Even with a lower mortality rate, this is still a tear jerker, so be warned. It’s also the shortest series on this list, with only twenty-one episodes.

Based on Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

 

 

Featured image via NegativeSpace

red white and royal blue

Amazon to Adapt LGBTQ Hit ‘Red, White & Royal Blue’ for TV

Berlanti Productions is still going strong, even without any future seasons of Arrow lined up after next year’s Season 8 conclusion.

Deadline reports that Amazon Studios and Berlanti Productions will be adapting Casey McQuiston’s Red White & Royal Blue, one of 2019’s most anticipated LGBTQ novels about an unexpected power couple romance.

 

Red White Royal Blue

Image via Amazon

 

Red White & Royal Blue follows America’s favorite son, White House royal-equivalent, Alex Claremont-Diaz, as he falls in love with former across the pond enemy, Prince Henry. The surprise romance causes all sorts of diplomatic complications between the two nations, and Alex’s relationship problems will be taken to another level.

The highly anticipated novel appears to be in good hands. Juilliard Playwriting graduate Ted Malawer will pen the adaptation, and Berlanti Productions has developed LGBTQ content with favorable audience approval, especially after its recent success with introducing LGBTQ superhero icon, Batwoman, to television (She was the only memorable part of that Arrowverse TV crossover).

While there is no release date for the rom-com adaptation, the novel will be published by Macmillan next month.

 

 

 

Featured Image via Deadline

Game of Thrones

Hilariously Honest Book Titles (Adaptations Edition)

Logic dictates that because there is no shortage of books to adapt for the screen, there is also no shortage of adaptations and titles to parody. (Not that we have any shortage of books to parody either—Honest Book Titles: Part 4 right here—just saying.) Here is our Adaptations Edition of Honest Book Titles:

(The following jokes do not reflect the views of Bookstr or its staff members. We just happen to find them hilarious. Viewer Discretion is Advised.)

 

1. Holes

Plot Holes

Holes

 

2. American Psycho

Why Knives, Master Wayne?

American Psycho

 

3. Life of Pi

Frosted Flakes Are the New Shrooms

LifeofPi

 

4. The Martian

Will Eat Poop Potatoes For Rescue

The Martian

 

5. I Am Legend

I Am Fresh Prince Meat

I Am Legend

 

6. The War of the Worlds

White People Can Be Colonized Too

The War of the Worlds

 

7. A Game of Thrones

I Lost the Game

Game of Thrones

 

8. The Shining

Two Girls, One Corpse

the shining

 

 

 

 

Adjusted Covers Via Masako Fukuchi; Plot Holes by Amy