Tag: classic literature

Seven Spectacular Jane Eyre Memes

Jane Eyre is a wonderful, compelling book. It’s also silly, competitive, and bonkers insulting. Let’s make it even sillier with the best the nonsense internet has to offer.

 

 

So you get this job in the middle of nowhere. Sure, they didn’t give you a lot of details, but at least nothing else is weird about it, and your new boss is super nice. Your name is not Jane Eyre.

 

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Life’s hard for an orphan, but Jane isn’t really one to complain, she kind of just takes it as it comes. It’s just as well, because even aside from her aunt hating her, people don’t seem to feel the need to be very nice to her, even our ‘hero’ and the rest of the people she meets at work.

 

 

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But boy do they. And she does too. Get some self confidence, girl! Sure, Rochester might not flirt like a normal person, but that’s no reflection on you. Being constantly downtrodden doesn’t mean you can’t live your best life! Why, when I was your age, I hadn’t received any proposals of marriage, and you have two! Sure, one is your cousin, and the other is already married, but ‘plain’ is either false or irrelevant. Mostly.

 

 

Image via The Bibliofile

 

We need a spin off. Did anyone else have about a million questions about Blanche? She’s pretty and popular, sure, and Rochester nearly marries her, but from Jane’s perspective, she’s sort of a force of nature. Personally, I want to know more.

It’s like things can never be easy for Jane. Even when she gets what she wants it goes sideways.

 

 

Image via Paste Magazine

 

So fun! Sure, it’s a bit of a rocky start, but marriage is complicated. I think those crazy kids can make it. Probably. If there’s something crazy that brings them back together. But what are the chances of that?

 

 

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We’re talking ARSON. We’re talking FALSE IMPRISONMENT. We’re talking BLINDNESS. How does Rochester feel so guilty but also act so cold? The man’s an enigma. Guilty as he may feel about Bertha, though, he moves on fast. You didn’t have to be so weird this whole time, man! You could’ve been happy!

 

 

Image via Twitter

 

I’d love to know what’s going on in that guy’s head. I sort of picture it like beauty and the beast where he’s just angry in some room alone, slamming doors.

Lot’s of ups and downs, but all’s well that ends well (is this a happy ending?), I guess.

 

 

Featured image via The Bibliofile 

Hemingway’s ‘The Old Man And The Sea’ Adapted For Stage By Lifelong Friend

THE OLD MAN’S LEGACY LIVES ON…

Ernest Hemingway coined the termed “the iceberg theory” which refers to an understated style of writing that concerns itself with surface elements in a story rather than the more preachy approach. In other words, Hemingway respected the intellect of his readers—we can see what’s beneath on our own. This is perhaps one of the reasons the man became so popular, this and his larger than life persona. One could argue that it was his relationship with the world that catered to his relatability and universal appeal. His most notable works are The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell To Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls and The Old Man and the Sea. The latter, for which Hemingway won the Pulitzer and Noble prize in the 1950s has just been adapted into a play by someone who used to fish with Master Hem himself.

Image Via Theguardian.com

AE Hotchner, a friend and longtime biographer of Hemingway’s during the time in which The Old Man and the Sea was written, promised Ernest he would adapt the novella before he died. The story goes, Hemingway went to see the 1958 John Sturges film version of his book with Hotchner and was dissatisfied (this is a nice word). In a recent interview, Hotchner described Hemingway’s reaction to the film:

“He said, ‘You know, you write a book that you really like and then they do something like that to it, and it’s like pissing in your father’s beer’,” Hotchner said. (Hemingway reserved this particular turn of phrase for a handful of hated adaptations of his work, he said.)

The film was miscast and lacked the novella’s vision. Hemingway asked his friend to take a “crack at it” and now, at 101 years old, Hotchner finally has. The subtext of The Old Man and the Sea more or less has to do with success; while writing The Old Man and the Sea, Hemingway was under a lot of pressure to reclaim his former glory. In the same way that the fisherman Santiago is after his marlin, Master Hem was after the reaffirmation of his own creativity and self-worth. This part of the story was not conveyed as well in the film adaption, it is the part that AE Hotchner wishes to accentuate on stage. He promised his friend he would.

Image Via cdapress.com

Some people define legacy as the things we leave behind; our relationships, work, and the impression we make on people. It’s easy to get distracted by our careers as we become obsessed with superficial things like money, fame and the fruitless pursuit of immortality. What we can all can take away from Hotchner’s life-long devotion to his friend is a blissful sense of pride in the only immortal thing that has ever existed; beneath it all—the sanctity of human connection. And now, after making a version of Master Hem’s tale for a new audience (not the annoyed teenagers in Mrs. Gross’s high school English class), Hotchner feels he’s honored the connection he once formed with a friend.

 

chandler bing hug GIF

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The play opens at Point Park University’s Pittsburgh Playhouse on February 1st.

 

 

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Harry Styles

Harry Styles Spotted Reading Up Ahead of Susan Sontag-Themed Met Gala

I was a huge One Direction fan throughout my teens and even past them. Actually, who am I kidding? I still listen to One Direction; I am not sorry for this. So you could imagine my excitement when I found out that the cool and fashion-forward Harry Styles will be co-hosting the 2019 Met Gala. With who, you ask? The fashion and music icon herself, Lady Gaga. Yes, I know, what a duo, but wait until you hear the theme.

 

Met Gala

 Image Via Pitchfork

 
Next year’s Met Gala will be sure to bring on insane ensembles. According to Harper’s Bazaar, “Camp: Notes on Fashion” will focus on a variety of exaggerated fashion and trends. Andrew Bolton, Costume Institute curator, told the Times what we could expect.

 

We are going through an extreme camp moment, and it felt very relevant to the cultural conversation to look at what is often dismissed as empty frivolity but can be actually a very sophisticated and powerful political tool… Whether it’s pop camp, queer camp, high camp or political camp.

 

So how are our two favorite idols preparing for hosting one of fashion’s biggest events? Harry Styles has begun brushing up on his literature of course. During his time in One Direction he could always be spotted carrying around some kind of book or his worn leather journal. This time he’s been spotted heading to a recording studio in LA on October 17th. Susan Sontag’s Against Interpretation: And Other Essays was her first major work. The author, filmmaker, activist, and philosopher is known for her intellectual views and research. The work Styles carried with him single-handedly decoded and broke down the cultural meanings of what “camp” truly means. Rather than something negative, Sontag declared the evolution of camp as something more distinct and aesthetic than negative and overdone.

 

Harry Styles

 Image Via HS Candids and Amazon

I do love a man who reads and I also love Harry Styles; this all works out. I can’t wait to see what other forms of literature and culture enter the famous Gala.

 

 

Featured Image Via Much

Mary Shelley

10 Quotes from the Distinguished Mary Shelley

I have to say, one of my fondest memories of college was when my professor (Professor English and yes that was his name) assigned us to read Mary Shelley’s classic novel, Frankenstein. The dark and beautiful work has stood the test of time and become one of the most famous works of literature the world has seen. It simply came from a competition amongst peers as to who could write the best horror story. Shelley even published it anonymously; it wasn’t until the second edition that everyone discovered it was her.

 

This woman broke boundaries and her success ran even with her husband’s, which, at that time, was surprising. Today is her 221st birthday, but this author should have a special place in our memory no matter what day it is. Here are ten quotes by the distinguished Mary Shelley.
 

 

 
1. “Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.”

 


 

2. “Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.”

 


 

3. “Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.”

 


 

4. “No man chooses evil because it is evil; he only mistakes it for happiness, the good he seeks.”

 


 

 
5. “I do know that for the sympathy of one living being, I would make peace with all. I have love in me the likes of which you can scarcely imagine and rage the likes of which you would not believe. If I cannot satisfy the one, I will indulge the other.”

 


 

6. “How dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge and how much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to be greater than his nature will allow.”

 


 

7. “The beginning is always today.”

 


 

8. “The companions of our childhood always possess a certain power over our minds which hardly any later friend can obtain.”

 


 

9. “Invention, it must be humbly admitted, does not consist in creating out of void but out of chaos.”

 


 

10. “The world to me was a secret, which I desired to discover; to her it was a vacancy, which she sought to people with imaginations of her own.”
 

 

 

 

Image Via GIPHY

 

 

 

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