Tag: cities

Summer Flings – 5 Fantasy Standalones

As the summer draws to a close, here’s a list of the five best fantasy books you just have to read before autumn arrives! All these books aren’t set in the summer, but they’re still the perfect thing to pick up, no strings attached! Whether you like paranormal, high fantasy, or light horror, you’ll find the perfect book to read in the sun (without falling asleep).

 

 

Uprooted – Naomi Novik

 

Uprooted
Image via Amazon

 

If you’re not reading Novik yet, then you’re missing out! This is the perfect standalone to get you started. Set on the outskirts of a terrifyingly magical forest, this book has a dragon (arguably), an unexpected heroine, plenty of violence, and even more magic. If you want a glorious modern story with the feel of a classic fantasy, you’re going to love this book. It’s also got sense, heart, and writing that’ll make you wonder why anyone else even tries.

 

The Coldest Girl in Coldtown – Holly Black

 

The Coldest Girl in Coldtown

Image via Amazon

 

Black writes a lot of different moods, so if you read fantasy you’ve probably encountered her. The Coldest Girl is and isn’t like anything else. Whether you’re over vampires or completely obsessed, give this book a try. A strong, sensible heroine who never the less gets drawn into danger and horror she thought she’d escaped, this book has both the elegance and horror of the genre, the obsession and the disinterest, as well as characters who step off the page.

 

Deep Secret – Danna Wynne Jones

 

Deep Secret
Image via Amazon

 

Jones is also outrageously prolific. Even if you haven’t read any of her work, you’ve probably seen the Miyazaki adaptation of one of her novels, Howl’s Moving Castle. This is something slightly different, but with Jones’ dry humor, sense of tangible magic, and deeply flawed characters you’ll still absolutely love. Royal succession, a secret magical society, and a digital curse make this book a classic, even if you may not know all the retro computer terms.

 

 

The Replacement – Brenna Yovanoff

 

The Replacement
Image via Amazon

 

You probably don’t know Yovanoff, but you might want to. This book is a little gruesome, but only in the way some old fairy tales are. Sometimes children in Gentry are taken, and Mackie Doyle is what was left. Exploring sacrifice, familial love, and what it means to be different, this is an unusual book that’s worth your consideration. The protagonist is complex, and teeters between selfishness and alarming selflessness. My advice? Read it with the lights on.

 

 

The Hobbit – J. R. R. Tolkien

 

The Hobbit
Image via Amazon

 

It doesn’t matter whether you’re a Lord of the Rings fan or haven’t even seen any of the movies, The Hobbit is self-contained novel that stands on its own. This book is sweet, engaging, frighting, and funny. If you like modern fantasy, here’s it’s start. If you love Tolkien, you know this is a great read and reread,  and if you never got into Tolkien and were too afraid to ask, this is a great place to start. Plus, they put the most gorgeous covers on this book now.

 

 

Featured image via inc.com

Seattle

Find Out What Makes Seattle ‘City of Literature’

The aim of UNESCO’s City of Literature Network is to “promote the social, economic and cultural development of cities in both the developed and developing world.” The network was born out of UNESCO’s global alliance for Cultural Diversity initiative. Participating cities can promote their local creative scene while fostering UNESCO’s goal of cultural diversity. The types of genres included are literature, music, design, film, crafts and folk art, media arts and gastronomy. 

 

City of Literature

Image Via Pinterest

 

In order to be approved your city must participate in a number of efforts to strengthen the market for literary products, be involved in diversifying the quantity and quality of publishing, host a number of literary events and translate literary works from diverse national languages to preserve and promote domestic and foreign literature for future generations. A few landmarks of literary value wouldn’t go amiss either.

 

 

bookstr

Image Via Getty Images

 

The network currently brings together 1,250 libraries and 130 literary festivals in 28 countries with a strong celebrated cultural literary heritage attached. A few of the cities include Prague, Czech Repubic; Lillehammer, Norway; Milan, Italy; Utrecht, Netherlands; and Dublin, Ireland. Im sure they’re proud to see their literary heritage getting recognition and rewarded. Getting recognised as a city of literaure is sure to boost the tourism economy. There are so many book lovers out there! 

 

Feature Image Via Book Riot

A picure of a bookstand with "blind date" books

Would You Go On A “Blind Date” With A Book?

You know what they say, you can’t judge a book by its cover; but let me ask you this, would you read a book even if you couldn’t see the cover?

 

Throughout the country, booksellers are captivating readers to be risk takers and read books solely based on the seller’s’ opinion. If you’ve ever been set up on a blind date, then you know that it’s all about taking chances — and booksellers want you to take a chance on them.

 
There are many locations that have adopted this idea, each offering a unique quality to their “blind date” process. For instance, at Book Culture, an NYC-based bookstore with three locations throughout the city, they wrap the book in a paper bag and the only clue they provide is a “read me if you liked these” list of book titles. This idea might seem crazy, but Cari Quartuccio from Book Culture says, “It’s been the most successful table we’ve ever put together.”

 

A picture of a book covered with a paper bag saying "read me if you liked"

 
If you consider yourself a “bookworm” and like being adventurous, then this concept might be the perfect fit for you.

To learn more about the different locations, check out the full article here.

 

Feature and in-text images courtesy The Wall Street Journal