Tag: Chuck Palahniuk

Anjelica Huston as The Grand High Witch in The Witches

6 Times the Book and Movie Had COMPLETELY Different Endings

Some (especially me!) would say that the ending is the most important part of the story. It is the last chance for the author to effect the audience, to really say something. It is the moment when everything comes together, the moment that everything builds to. Here, the intentions behind the story become clear.

Which is why it’s really frustrating, blood-boiling even, when the movie changes the ending! Here are six movie adaptations that completely changed the book’s ending. Some of them make for a better story, but not all of them. Especially not that film.

Oh yeah, spoilers. But these books and films are like —*mental math sounds* —old.

 

6. The Witches

 

According to Syfy, the 1990 film The Witches is the most iconic Roald Dahl adaptation. It’s both terrifying and awe-inspiring. The witches have, as described in the book, bald heads, eyes that change color, and toeless feet. Heck, just look at the Grant High Witch (Anjelica Huston) in all her glory:

 

Image result for witches, grand high witch
IMAGE VIA BOOK PUNKS

 

Just kidding. That’s just her unmasking. This is what she REALLY looks like:

 

Image result for witches, grand high witch
IMAGE VIA SYFY WIRE

 

Most 90s kids will agree that image sent shivers up their spine and is burnt into their consciousness. The story follows a little boy named Luke Eveshim who unwittingly stumbles upon the annual meeting of witches, taking place in the hotel where he is staying with his grandmother. The witches are planning to turn children into mice, and Luke is one of their first victims.

The film follows the 1983 child’s book of the same name rather closely. That is, until the ending. In the book, Luke remains a mouse, however this is not portrayed as a sad ending, as his lifespan as a mouse will be about equal to the amount of time his grandmother has left alive, and thus they will live out the remainder of their lives together.

In the film, HOWEVER, one of the witches doesn’t like how the Grand High Witch is treating her so she bails, and tracks down Luke (who is still a mouse), reversing the spell and turning him back into a little boy.

BBC News reported that Roald Dahl, dismissed this film’s ending as “utterly appalling”. Personally, I think after seeing their interpretation of the Grand High Witch,  I’d cut the film some slack for its happy ending.

 

5. The Shining

 

We’ve all absorbed the story through the cultural zeitgeist—through either reading the Stephen King novel, seeing the Stanley Kubrick film, or just seeing enough stills and hearing enough quotes from the film to consider ourselves fairly familiar with one of the most iconic thrillers of the modern age. So, as you probably know, The Shining follows Jack Torrence (portrayed by Jack Nicholson), a man struggling with both with writer’s block and alcoholism, who brings his family to a remote hotel he can finally complete his play.

 

IMAGE VIA THE EUROPEAN UNION TIMES

 

Unfortunately, the two creators – King and Kubrick – were fundamentally at odds with each other. According to The Guardian, King received one call from the infamous director which went something like this:

Kubrick: “I think stories of the supernatural are fundamentally optimistic, don’t you? If there are ghosts then that means we survive death.”

King: “What’s that mean?”

(A long pause)

Kubrick: “I don’t believe in hell.”

So the two creators didn’t see eye to eye. What more is that the films diverge far before the ending. According to Steven King, “in the book, there’s an actual arc where you see this guy, Jack Torrance, trying to be good, and little by little he moves over to this place where he’s crazy. And as far as I was concerned, when I saw the movie, Jack was crazy from the first scene.”

Knowing this, it’s hard to explain why these two approaches reach vastly different endings. In the novel, Jack Torrence regains his senses and sacrifices himself – giving his son Danny and wife Wendy time to escape with Dick Hallorann.

In the Kubrick film, Danny runs from a crazy Jack through a hedge maze ( the book features topiary animals that come to life, but no giant hedge maze) and eventually evades Jack. Exhausted, Jack collapses to the ground while the others escape – without Dick Hallorann as he is killed in the film version – and Jack freezes to death.

 

Image result for kubrick frozen jack
IMAGE VIA SICK CHIRPSE

As Steven King said, “…the book ends in fire, and the movie in ice.”

That sums it up pretty well.

 

4. Fight Club

 

Here’s a case in which the author actually preferred the film adaptation to their own book.

Chuck Palahniuk’s novel Fight Club ends with with Jack/Tyler Durdan in a mental hospital. Yeah, that was inevitable.

 

Image result for fight club
IMAGE VIA IFC CENTER

But the David Fincher film gets revolutionary. Jack holds hands with Marla while Project Mayhem goes off without a hitch, and the city’s buildings crumble to the ground. Brief shot of a penis (see the movie, read the book to get it) before we cut to credits.

 

Image result for palahniuk chuck
IMAGE VIA FAMOUS BIOGRAPHIES

Mr. Palahniuk himself said in an interview “…when I sat down…[to]…record a commentary track for the DVD, I was sort of embarrassed of the book, because the movie had streamlined the plot and made it so much more effective and made connections that I had never thought to make”.

So the film is Palahniuk approved.

 

3. A Clockwork Orange (1971)

 

Oh, Kubrick. I love you – you made greats films like 2001: A Space Odyssey and Dr. Strangelove: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb – but sometimes, you were too smart for your own good.

What was I talking about? Oh yeah: in 1962 Anthony Burgess published A Clockwork Orange and 1971 saw the release of the Kubrick’s film. While Anthony Burgess made it clear he didn’t want to be remembered by this novel, his fate was fixed when Kubrick had a young Malcolm McDowell stare into a camera lens, his glassy eyes gazing right through the audience.

 

Image result for a clockwork orange kubrick
IMAGE VIA INDIE WIRE

Both stories follow the character of Alex before and after his imprisonment. While the plot of the novel and the film are largely the same (except for character swaps here and there) the endings differ.

In the film Alex is de-conditioned during his recuperation in a hospital, during which time, he meets with government office and makes a deal with them: Alex will tell everyone the government isn’t at fault and they are friends (even though the government in this dystopian setting are to blame for Alex being literally unable to defend himself). After this deal, Alex looks at the camera and goes, “I was cured alright,” as Beethoven’s 9th blare out. Alex’s fantasies are back in full wind and he faces no more consequences for his actions.

 

IMAGE VIA THE INTERNATIONAL ANTHONY BURGESS FOUNDATION

The novel, on the other hand, includes an extra chapter. In Chapter Twenty-One, Alex finds an old friend, Pete, who is now married and settled down. Alex begins imagining that kind of life for himself, signifying his change into adulthood. Consequence of Sound quotes Anthony Burgess as saying, “My young hoodlum comes to the revelation of the need to get something done in life.”

 

2. First Blood

 

The iconic 1982 movie is based on David Morrell’s 1972 novel First Blood, in which Rambo dies!

Yes, the iconic character dies. Also, his name is Rambo in the book. Just Rambo. The film takes extensive liberties such as giving Rambo a first name (John).

 

Book cover for First Blood by David Morrell
IMAGE VIA CANNONBALL READ

 

In the film, Rambo goes after Sheriff Teastle and, as he prepares to kill him, his commanding officer Trautman arrives to stop Rambo. Rambo ceases fighting and surrenders to Trautman in order to be taken into custody.

However, in the novel, Rambo puts a stick of dynamite against his chest when he goes after Sheriff Teastle. But Sheriff Teastle doesn’t fire back and that Rambo is too weak to light the dynamite. Alas, he is then shot in the head. No sequel for Rambo. Trautman has put him out of his misery and Teasle feels a moment of affection for Rambo before he dies.

 

First Blood movie poster feature Stallone
IMAGE VIA ALL POSTER

Both mediums are about Vietnam veterans, but the novel, released during the Vietnam War, depicts a character unable to stop fighting while the film, released seven years after the war officially ended, shows a character who is willing to surrender for the greater good.

 

1. I Am Legend

This totally isn’t that film that I was talking about in the beginning. Calm down.

So Richard Matheson’s book and the 2007 film starring Will Smith have the same premise: a man walks alone in a post-apocalyptic city filled with plague monsters. In the book, they’re vampires. In the film, they’re zombies. Oh well. I can live with that. So far, so good.

 

I Am Legend book cover by Richard Matheson featuring hoard of vampires
IMAGE VIA AMAZON

The movie ends with Will Smith’s Dr. Robert Neville in an all-out brawl with the infected zombies, eventually sacrificing himself to save other survivors while they escape with a cure.

Movie poster for I Am Legend featuring Will Smith
IMAGE VIA ROTTEN TOMATOES

The book ends with Robert Neville attacking in an all-out brawl with the infected zombies, eventually realizing that he has become a monster. The world is no longer meant for humans – and the monsters fear him the way he fears them. He understands that their desire to kill him is not something he can condemn and thus resigns from life, leaving the earth to the monsters.

Get a load of this kicker: the filmmakers actually had the book’s original ending in the script. Heck, they even filmed that ending. But it didn’t do well with test audiences, so it was given a Hollywood ending. Even the film’s director, Francis Lawrence, told Screen Rant, “I agree [the book has] the better ending.”

Dear children, I’m not mad. I’m disappointed.

 

 

Featured Image Via Potentash

Chuck Palahniuk and the cover of 'Fight Club 3'

Chuck Palahniuk Is Writing ‘Fight Club 3’ and It’s a Little Different…

Ah, Fight Club. Chuck Palahniuk’s 1996 novel about an unnamed insomniac narrator finding solace in beating the absolute heck out of other people—and being beaten back in turn— that winds through a mind-boggling plot, driven by the novel’s demented antagonist, Tyler Durden. The story ends with one of the most startling twists in fiction, and has earned an enormous following and birthed several beloved quotes, including: “The things you used to own, now they own you.” and “It’s only after we’ve lost everything that we’re free to do anything.”

 

Cover of 'Fight Club'

Image via AbeBooks

 

The novel was left as a standalone until 2015, when Fight Club 2: The Tranquility Gambit was released. Fight Club 2 is a comic book “meta-sequel” to its predecessor, and continues the story of the original protagonist as told by the original antagonist (no spoilers, but if you know how Fight Club ends that plot device is way more compelling then your typical antagonist-as-narrator story).

 

Cover of 'Fight Club 2'

Image via Amazon

 

Now, Palahniuk has just announced that Fight Club 3 is on its way! This upcoming installment will throw a new complication into the already chaotic Fight Club universe: a child. There’s no telling what Tyler Durden is going to do now that he’s got to deal with a baby around but I, for one, am deeply concerned.

 

In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, Palahniuk gave this little tidbit about the comic:

 

Fight Club 3 is about what happens when you need to team up with your enemy,” Palahniuk said in a statement. “And the situation is even more complicated here, given Tyler Durden and Balthazar’s unique relationship. And, yes, bodily fluids will be exchanged.

 

Sounds gross but cool, much as I would expect from Palahniuk. The first issue of the comic will be published by Dark Horse Comics on January 30th, which ought to be plenty of time for all of us to catch up on the series.

 

Cover and variant covers of 'Fight Club 3'

Image via Comic Book Resources

 

Featured Image Via Flavorwire and Comic Book Resources

Chuck Palahniuk

Apparently Chuck Palahniuk Coined the Term “Snowflake”

If you’ve been around in the last, I don’t know, decade? you’ve heard the word “snowflake” as an insult. Lately, it’s come to mean someone who’s too sensitive, takes things too seriously, can’t hear an opposing opinion without flipping their lid. But where did the term come from? Apparently, from Chuck Palahniuk. But don’t take my word for it, take Chuck’s:

 

The phone rang at four a.m. It was the Times in London.

A reporter told me that the Oxford English Dictionary had noted a resurgence of people using the word “snowflake.” Snowflake had become a synonym for being overly sensitive, and it was being lobbed like a hand grenade between political opponents. The reporter told me that Wikipedia attributed the source of the insult to me, to my novel Fight Club. Specifically to the speech which begins:  “You are not a beautiful and unique snowflake…”  The reporter asked if that was true. Had I coined the latest put-down?

I didn’t know. It was four in the morning for fuck’s sake. I said, maybe. I said my guess was that the book and film might’ve started it.

Unable to fall asleep, I checked Wikipedia. At the moment, it said the term was tenuously attributed to Fight Club.

Two hours after I’d spoken with the reporter, Wikipedia had been revised. Around six a.m. it now said that I claimed full responsibility for the term snowflake in its current usage.

To set the record straight, I got blindsided.

 

So maybe he did, maybe he didn’t, but according to the author “his use of the term ‘snowflake’ never had anything to do with fragility or sensitivity. It just meant that I wasn’t going to be dismissed as just another mass-produced ‘genius.'”

 

Featured Image Via The Talks, (snow from YouTube.)

Chuck Palahniuk

‘Fight Club’ Author Chuck Palahniuk’s Newest Book Promises to Offend

Chuck Palahniuk, author of the iconic novel-turned-Academy-Award-nominated film Fight Club is releasing a new book in May 2018. 

 

His upcoming novel, titled Adjustment Day, will reach bookshelves on May 1, 2018. It will be published by W.W. Norton & Company, who has worked will Palahniuk before and published Fight Club, Invisible Monsters, and Survivor.

 

Though Palahniuk and his publishers have remained vague on plot details, the novel promises to be a hell of a read, according to a press release.

 

The press release goes on to say:

 

Fight Club put Palahniuk on the map as a transgressive visionary. Now, Adjustment Day blows past all previous markers for impropriety with a brilliant, hilarious, and outrageous story that is perfect for our era. Every reader, of every stripe, will find something in Adjustment Day that is as profoundly wise, funny, and affecting as it is offensive. And, make no mistake, everyone will be offended.

 

Palahniuk goes on to compare his newest novel to perhaps his most popular work, stating:

 

W.W. Norton brought my first book, Fight Club, into the world. My next book, Adjustment Day, is to Fight Club what Atlas Shrugged is to The Fountainhead—a bigger package of bold characters and norm-bashing ideas. And it’s proof that W.W. Norton and I have great faith in one another. I’m pleased as punch to be working once more with such a brave, ground-breaking publisher.

 

While readers should stay tuned for additional details regarding Adjustment Day, brave fans can go ahead and pre-order the novel today.

 

Featured image via The Talks / Amazon

Margaret Atwood Playboy

14 Iconic Authors Bare It All in Playboy Without Taking Their Clothes Off

Whether you love him or hate him, there’s no denying the effect Hefner’s work has had on both the literary and publishing worlds. In memoriam of Hugh Hefner’s life and career, we’ve put together a list of some of the most notable authors and interviews published in Playboy to prove that yes, some people really do read it for the articles. 

 

Margaret Atwood Playboy

I had so much fun making the featured image that I couldn’t not also make a full cover. Enjoy. / Image Via The New Yorker, Photoshopped by yours truly.

 

If you’ve got a subscription to Playboy, be sure to check out the Playboy Archive for digital copies of magazines ranging from 1954 to 2007.

 

1. An Interview with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Image via Wikipedia

 

In 1964, just after he had won the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. sat down with Alex Haley for a series of interviews, which were then edited together for the magazine’s January 1965 issue. The interview is the longest interview King gave to a publication. Ever. King speaks of his observations of the Civil Rights Movement (at that point) and the first time he remembered experiencing racism. He was forced to stand on a bus, not too dissimilar to Rosa Parks’ story, which later inspired him to stage a bus boycott. 

 

2.  Haruki Murakami, author of Norwegian Wood

 

Haruki Murakami

Image via Time Magazine

 

Japan’s most popular author and one of the “world’s greatest living novelists”, Haruki Murakami has written bangers like Norwegian Wood, 1Q84, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, and Kafka on the Shore. ‘The Second Bakery Attack‘, first published in 1992, was later published in a collection of short stories called The Elephant Vanishes: Stories.

 

3. Kurt Vonnegut, author of Slaughterhouse-Five

 

Kurt Vonnegut

Image via Wikipedia

 

Vonnegut first appeared in Playboy in a 1973 interview. Most notably, though, the magazine was the first to publish an excerpt from Armageddon in Retrospect, Vonnegut’s first posthumous collection. The collection features several new short stories, a letter Vonnegut wrote to his family during his time as a prisoner of war in World War II, drawings, and a speech written shortly before his death.

 

4. Jack Kerouac, author of On the Road

 

Jack Kerouac

Image via CMG Worldwide

 

Playboy published two of Kerouac’s stories during his lifetime: Before the Road, a short story prequel to On the Road published in 1959, and 1965’s Good Blonde.

 

5. Ray Bradbury, author of Fahrenheit 451

 

Ray Bradbury

Image via Wikipedia

 

During the first years of Playboy’s life their budget only allowed for reprinted stories, and in 1954 they published a serialized version of Fahrenheit 451. ‘The First Night of Lent’, Bradbury’s first original story for the publication in 1956, was among the first previously unpublished stories the magazine sent to print.

 

6. Margaret Atwood, author of The Handmaid’s Tale.

 

Margaret Atwood

Image via The New Yorker

 

Atwood’s first foray into Playboy was in 1991 with the publication of ‘The Bog Man’. ‘The Bog Man’ recounts the discovery of a 2,000 year old man during a trip between a Canadian student and the married archaeology professor she is in love with. Atwood’s other works published in Playboy include The Bad News (2006) and The Age of the Bottleneck (2008).

 

7. Gabriel García Márquez, author of Love in the Time of Cholera

 

Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Image via Inspire Portal

 

Published in 1971, Marquez’s short story ‘The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World‘ is about a ridiculously handsome dead body that washes up onto shore and enchants an entire village. If you’re unfamiliar with Marquez’s work, I absolutely recommend A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings.

 

8. Ian Fleming, author of the James Bond novels

 

Ian Fleming

Image via Ian Fleming

 

According to John Cork, founding member of the Ian Fleming Foundation, “by 1960 Ian Fleming, James Bond, and Playboy magazine became a nearly synonymous cultural force, truly united with Playboy‘s publication of [Fleming’s story] The Hildebrand Rarity.” Fleming’s 11th book, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, was published simultaneously as a hardcover in Britain and serialized in Playboy from April to June 1963.

 

9. Roald Dahl, author of The BFG, The Witches, and many others

 

Roald Dahl

Image via Penguin Books

 

Dahl’s only non-children’s book, My Uncle Oswald, was based on ‘The Visitor’, a story written for and published in Playboy in May of 1965. You wouldn’t think a beloved children’s author would fit in with the publication but Dahl describes main character Oswald as “the greatest fornicator of all time”, so. Dahl’s first original story for Playboy was ‘A Fine Son’, published in 1959.

 

10. Joseph Heller, author of Catch-22

 

Joseph Heller

Image via Biography.com

 

Heller refers to his short story ‘Yossarian Survives’ (published in Playboy in 1987) as a lost chapter of Catch-22. The story describes Yossarian’s training at Lowry Field Air Force base in Denver, Colorado. Fans interested in reading this ‘lost chapter’ can find it in Catch As Catch Can: The Collected Stories and Other Writings.

 

11. Chuck Palahniuk, author of Fight Club

 

Chuck Palahniuk

Image via Chuck Palahniuk

 

Palahniuk is no stranger to getting published in Playboy, but I’m including him for a reason very close-to-home. When I was twelve-years-old, rifling through my best friend’s stepfather’s magazines, I found what would eventually become one of my favorite short stories. Palahniuk’s controversial short story ‘Guts was first published in the March 2004 issue of Playboy. ‘Guts’ is part of Palahniuk’s short story collection Haunted: A Novel.

 

12. Hunter S. Thompson, father of Gonzo journalism

 

Hunter S. Thompson

Image via Rolling Stone 

 

The Great Shark Hunt graced Playboy‘s pages in 1973 and was later published in a book of autobiographical essays of the same name. Over his career, Thompson’s work appeared in Playboy on a number of occasions.

 

13. Truman Capote, author of Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Three Stories.

 

Truman Capote

Image via Mom Advice

 

In the January 1984 issue of Playboy, Capote retold some of the most outrageous stories from friend and playwright Tennessee Williams’s life. It wasn’t the first time Capote was featured in the magazine. He was also the subject of a 1968 interview about his writing career, the role of Jewish writers in the American literary scene, and his views on capital punishment.

 

14. An Interview with Joyce Carol Oates, author of 56 novels, and a lot more.

 

Joyce Carol Oates

Image via Lewis Center for the Arts

 

The 1993 interview calls Oates:

 

one of the most prolific writers in America. Her critics even complain that she writes too much. She has written more novels than Nobel laureate Saul Bello, more short story collections than John Updike, more books of essays than Norman Mailer, more words of poetry than Emily Dickinson and more plays than Chekhov. Critic Harold Bloom considers her “our true proletarian novelist.”

 

Featured image via The New Yorker, improved via my own photoshop abilities.