Tag: china

Bloomsbury Caught in Crossfire Between Us and China

The publishing company that brought us Harry Potter, Bloomsbury, has been faced with an increase of fifteen percent from China for books printed there. This happened overnight on the first of September.

 

Image result for bloomsbury publishing"

Image via BriefedUp

 

According to Chief Executive Nigel Newton, the company wasn’t prepared for this increase but they are doing their best to take it in stride. This increase should only have a small impact for the finical year, but could possibly cause some issues in the future. Newton says that illustrated books, such as the Harry Potter illustrated editions are published in China due to the good pricing and quality.

 

 

Unfortunately from March to August there was a five percent decrease in Sales, but Newton wasn’t worried about future sales. When E-books were forced introduced everyone feared how they would take over, but according to Newton, it doesn’t matter if it’s an e-book or printed copy, they’re still buying a book from the company, so E-books just helped increase sales.

 

Featured image via BBC

Three Books About Aliens and #ThingsWeAreNeverMeantToKnow

Alright, so I don’t really think there’s stuff we’re not meant to know – vive la science! – but a lot of people were talking about aliens (and Monty Python – Twitter, never change), so here are some books about aliens to start knowing some things. Maybe. The truth is out there!

Cinder – Marissa Meyer

This is a great start for anyone who likes their sci-fi light and lush, with enough cyborgs, psychics, and space travel to satisfy more die-hard fans. Set in futuristic Beijing, this well wrought fairy tale retelling features plague, sisterhood, and a robot who’ll be your favorite character. What more could you want? Crime? Formal wear? A lost foot? All that and more, plus, your book hangover will be delayed for quite a while, because there are several excellent sequels and a delightful graphic novel companion series. And did I mention Cinder is a mechanic? She’s a mechanic. Heart eyes.

 

These Broken Stars – Amie Kaufman, Meagan Spooner

Quick question – are you ready to suffer? This is a good book, maybe even a great one, but it’s going to break your entire heart and not even be sorry. Two strangers, the only survivors of a massive spaceliner crash, try to find their way across an alien landscape to the ship’s wreckage and hope of rescue. An unlikely pair, an heiress and a former soldier must work together not only to survive harsh conditions on dwindling hope, but to discover the secrets of this planet, long hidden, and more lovely and terrible than they could have imagined. Like I said, this one’ll hurt, but read it anyway. It’s earned.

 

Binti – Nnedi Okorafor

Confession; this one’s from my TBR. But it’s at the top of the list! Brutal, large scale war against terrifying aliens, an intergalactic university, and the terrible pull of leaving the Earth behind. Clocking in at under a hundred pages, this is definitely a quick read, but don’t worry about being abandoned – it’s the first of three novellas. Plus, we always, always stan a heroine who’s good at math. Isn’t that the dream? Be good at math, and risk death to go to space school? Don’t boo me, I’m right.

Images via Amazon

Featured image via DevantArt 

Trump Advisor’s Book to be Sold with ‘Fiction’ Warning

Peter Navarro, a trade advisor for the Trump administration, published Death by China in 2011, but now Navarro’s publishers are attaching an addendum to the book to warn readers it contains quotes from a made-up character.

image via the new york times

One of Navarro’s key sources used in Death by China has been outed as being fake. Navarro frequently cites a Harvard-trained economist named Ron Vara with a backstory that strangely parallels Navarro’s own life. You might also have noticed that “Ron Vara” is an anagram of “Navarro.” Well, turns out there is not Ron Vara and, in fact, Navarro frequently used the pseudonym to plug gaps in his book on economic policy and China. Navarro would often speak through Vara about the supposed dangers of Chinese imports:

Only the Chinese can turn a leather sofa into an acid bath, a baby crib into a lethal weapon, and a cellphone battery into heart-piercing shrapnel.

image via amazon.com

Navarro responded to the controversy by saying that his use of a fake source was used as a “whimsical device” and “at no time was the character used improperly as a fact source.” Navarro has tried to play off his using Vara as a fun inside joke. His publisher, however, is a little bit more concerned. New editions of Death by China will have warnings attached to let readers know of the circumstances surrounding Navarro’s use of Ron Vara as a source.

Featured image via The Straits Times

TV Adaptation of Chinese Science Fiction Novel ‘The Three-Body Problem’ Coming!

 

Exciting news for fans of science fiction literature! China’s biggest science fiction novel, The Three-Body Problemis being adapted for television according to The Verge! The science fiction epic novel has become a phenomenon in China and received international acclaim. Written by Liu Cixin, who has won the Galaxy Award nine times, the 2017 Locus Award, and the 2015 Huge Award. He has written numerous acclaimed science fiction books, including The Wandering Earth, Ball Lightningand also two sequels to The Three-Body Problem. A film adaptation of The Wandering Earth, released in February 2019, became the second highest grossing film in China in only two weeks!

 

Image via Wikipedia 

The Three-Body Problem was published in 2006 and begins in the backdrop of the Chinese Cultural Revolution. A dissident exile is sent to a remote research facility and makes first contact there with a hostile alien species known as Trisolarans. She learns the aliens are planning to take over Earth. The novel skips ahead to the modern day afterward, following a team of scientists preparing for the aliens arrival. The novels themes not only deal with the alien invasion but the nature of the universe itself.

The novel has been attempted to be adapted before, first as a short film by director Fanfan Zhang but was shelved due to quality issues. However, interest in Cixin’s work picked up again with the release of The Wandering Earth, especially after it was picked up and began streaming on Netflix. Chinese production company YooZoo Entertainment holds the rights to the series and is reportedly developing it for television. The series is planned to run as a 24 part series and is slated (unofficially) to begin shooting this September. While no further information is available at this time, it’s not hard to imagine that Netflix might stream the series as it did for The Wandering Earth. 

We’ll keep you updated as further information comes out. But are you excited to see this Chinese science fiction epic adapted for the television screen? Let us know in the comments!

 

 

Featured Image Via The Verge