Tag: Children’sillustrators

Image via Bradenton Herald

This New Children’s Book Celebrates Muslim Women

From posting her artwork on Tumblr and DeviantArt to illustrating a published children’s book, Aaliya Jaleel is starting her illustration career off with a bang.

 

Cheryl Klein, editorial director for the New York-based Lee & Low Books, was searching high and low, for an artist to illustrate for the upcoming children’s book Under my Hijab. The book highlights and focuses on the different ways that hijabs are worn, informing its audience of the cultural significance throughout each story it tells throughout the book. Before being approached to work on Under the Hijab, written by Hena Khan, the only publishing experienced that Aaliya Jaleel had was a small book that she had illustrated and published for an English teacher back when she was at Brighter Horizons Academy in Garland.

 

 

Image via Bradenton Herald

Image via Bradenton Herald

 

 

Despite the daunting nature of illustrating something this big, Jaleel pushed through, hoping she could portray the different reasons and ways that people wear hijabs through her illustrations. Finding different ways to tackle the project, she took on a child’s perspective to accurately depict the characters and their stories within the book. Meeting deadline after deadline, Jaleel and the author work together to edit drafts and sketches. Utilizing different art programs, she used both Procreate and Photoshop to illustrate the book.

 

After finishing Under My Hijab, satisfied and proud of her work, Jaleel is pursuing other projects and has started to work on Muslim Girls Rise, a compilation of the small biographies focusing on progressive Muslim women. The number of Muslim-inspired children’s books is steadily increasing, creating a more diversified selection for children of all backgrounds.

 

Check out some of Aaliya Jaleel’s work and follow her to keep up with her upcoming works!

 

 

Under my Hijab will be available for purchase on January 22, 2019.

 

 

Featured Image Via Bradenton Herald

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A Love Letter to Jon Klassen, Author of ‘I Want My Hat Back’

Dear adored children’s author Jon Klassen,

I have purchased the entirety of your Hat series, I Want My Hat Back, We Found a Hat, and This Is Not My Hat for my first cousins. While they may have not enjoyed them as much as I had, I’ll still purchase them for future cousins to come. 

 

I first fell in love with your books while working at an independent bookstore in quiet Sunnyvale, California. The associated children’s bookstore next door carried your books, so when I sauntered in looking to expand my literary range, I saw it. The newly published We Found a Hat.  It’s pink and grey ombre cover and the cute little turtles just sitting so entrancingly. I grabbed the book and took it next door, not knowing what I was getting myself into.

 

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Image Via Tumblr

 

From my past experiences in children’s literature, I was expecting a simplified story with a moral about friendship, family, or how to be a decent child in the world. Your writing and illustrations gave a whole new meaning to picture books.

 

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Image Via Amazon

 

Just look at that turtle’s side eye. I have never seen a more relevant expression in any pictorial depiction in my twenty years of life. By the end of the book, I was hooked. The New York Times blurb about We Found A Hat being “a masterpiece” and The Boston Globe calling it “a moving story about loyalty, sacrifice, friendship, and the power of imagination” were no understatements. Thank goodness you had four other books published at the time. I ran next door, slammed the book on the counter, and ran back over to the children’s book section to pick up a copy of every book we had. 

 

Amazon’s description of I Want My Hat Back left me with many questions, “A picture-book delight by a rising talent tells a cumulative tale with a mischievous twist.” I could be getting myself into anything at this point and I stayed unafraid. I swiftly went back to the front desk on my side of the store and opened up I Want My Hat Back

 

The range of emotion expressed by this bear is immeasurable and I will never find a better visual expression of betrayal and realization of the betrayal in beautiful watercolor paintings. While browsing around the internet, I also found a video recreation of I Want My Hat Back which perfectly displays the same emotions felt while reading it.

 

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Image Via Goodreads

 

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Image Via Gallery Nucleus

 

You can use feel the tension in the bear and rabbit’s eyes. 

 

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Image Via Pinterest

 

While browsing around the internet, I also found a video recreation of I Want My Hat Back which perfectly displays the same emotions felt while reading it.

 

 

This was the moment that I decided that my gift to future generations of children would be a set of your books. Not only are they enjoyable for children, but also provide just enough entertainment for their adult reading counterparts. I spent the rest of the night reading all of your work and have never been more content and at peace while reading children’s literature. They were smart enough to get me audibly laughing and they didn’t dumb down concepts for children.

 

Along with your fantastic children’s books, your twitter is absolute gold. A few days ago you shared a series of books from Mia Coulton about a yellow labrador named Danny.

 

 

Another day you retweeted a picture of a very round duck wearing a cute little hat from the account Round Animals and have spread the cute critters to my Twitter feed.

 

 

You have not only shared the joys of children’s literature, but also nuggets of gold on Twitter.  

 

Thank you Jon Klassen for all the joy with which you have provided me, and now my cousins, for the past two years. 

 

Maybe together, we could find a hat. 

 

Featured Image Via PictureBook Makers.

Ezra Jack Keats

9 Ezra Jack Keats Book Covers to Bring You Back to Childhood

There are only a handful of books that stand the test of time, let alone children’s books. It’s even rarer that they carry important lessons that go well beyond a child’s mind. Next month would’ve been his 102nd birthday, but the legacy of Ezra Jack Keats has it’s stamp across many generations. The endearing author and illustrator broke the mould of children’s literature and was among the first to introduce multiculturalism into that sector.

 

Keats was known for his warm illustrations which introduced an urban setting to his readers. They was uncommon, unusual, but so unique and loved amongst his audience,  especially by those in neighborhoods like the ones depicted, including my own mom. A Brooklyn native himself, Keatz created characters that were familiar to him, many of them people of color. Now, during Black History Month, it only feels right to remember the man who gave every child a chance to relate to literary characters. His use of collage created some of his most notable illustrations.
 
 
Here are nine of his most beautiful and significant book covers:

 

1.  Over in the Meadow

 

Ezra Jack Keats

Image Via Amazon

 

2. Kitten for a Day

 

Ezra Jack Keats

Image Via Amazon

 

3. The Little Drummer Boy

 

Ezra Jack Keats

Image Via Amazon

 

4. Goggles

 

Ezra Jack Keats

Image Via Amazon

 

5. Pet Show!

 

Ezra Jack Keats

Image Via Amazon

 

6. Clementina’s Cactus (Picture Books)

 

Ezra Jack Keats

Image Via Goodreads

 

7. A Letter to Amy

 

Ezra Jack Keats

Image Via Amazon

 

8. Peter’s Chair (Picture Puffins)

 

Ezra Jack Keats

Image Via Amazon

 

9. The Snowy Day

 

Ezra Jack Keats

Image Via Amazon

 

Feature Image Via Arizona Jewish Post

'Mary and the Witch's Flower'

‘Mary and the Witch’s Flower’ Trailer Promises Miyazaki Meets Harry Potter

I can clearly remember, as a kid, all the great Hayao Miyazaki films I’d spend hours watching at home. My Neighbor Totoro, Kiki’s Delivery Service, Castle in the Sky, and Spirited Away are among my favorites. Miyazaki is of another world, I will definitely say that. From the beautiful illustrations to the wistful stories, it’s no wonder they’ve all become classic movies for all ages. 

 

'Mary and the Witch's Flower'

 Image Via IndieWire

 

For those of you with me on that one, we’ve got another treat coming our way. The American trailer for Mary and the Witch’s Flower has just been released and I’m feeling like I’m seven years old all over again!

 

'The Little Broomstick'

 Image Via Goodreads

 

Based on the 1971 children’s book The Little Broomstick, the story follows a young Mary in a rural British village who comes across a magical flower. The blossom takes her on an adventure through the clouds to a witch’s school where she meets an array of characters who turn out to be more mystical than she imagined. I do really love all the characters these creators think up. Although Miyazaki has not graced this film with his presence, former Ghibli animator, Hiromasa Yonebayashi, has taken the role of director. So that’s a tell-tale sign that this film will be nothing short of amazing. The American film’s distributor, GKIDS, tells SyFy Wire what to expect:

 

Mary and The Witch’s Flower is an all-ages action adventure that harkens back to some of the most beloved animated films of all time, full of ingenious characters, jaw-dropping, imaginative worlds and the simple, heartfelt story of a young girl trying to figure her place in the world.

 

With the witchery of the Harry Potter world, the characters and adventures of Spirited Away, and the coming-of-age essence within Kiki’s Delivery Service, I really cannot wait for its release on January 19, 2018. Check out the trailer and fall in love!

 

 

Feature Image Via The Verge

Rocket Science

Give Children the Gift of Rocket Science This Holiday Season

“It’s not rocket science” might be a phrase that is lost on future generations as the level of intricate, intelligent science becomes more and more attainable. When I hear the term “rocket science” it is always in comparison to something that I can actually do, you know, because who would understand rocket science? Andrew Radar’s newest book aims to educate the masses on the basic concepts. His target audience is children ages six to ten,  but don’t worry, he says that adults can learn a thing or two from it as well.

 

Rocket Science

Image Via Rocket Science/Andrew Rader/Galen Frazer 

 

Rader, a SpaceX aerospace engineer, splits the book into two different parts. The first explains how a rocket works, the reasoning behind the design, how it makes sense to “rocket stage,” which means stacking rockets on top of each other during takeoff and then separating in order to distribute weight properly, and how they land.

 

The second half of the book goes into the details of space exploration, which paths to take around our solar system and why, planetary exploration, and reveals some of the missions rockets have taken in the past. He believes that adults with no science background can apply these basic ideas to their lives in the future.

 

Rocket Science

Image Via Rocket Science/Andrew Rader/Galen Frazer

 

Rader wrote two other children’s books titled, McLongneck’s Epic Space Adventure and Mars Rover Rescuewhich were both marketed towards children ages 5 and 6. He told, The Verge:

 

We wanted to catch that same group as they got older and keep them on that trajectory. Little kids love space and they naturally are interested in it, but older kids, they lose interest between the ages of six and 10, and eventually by 11 or 12 they don’t think space is cool anymore. So we wanted to keep interest going in that critical time period.

 

Professional graphic artist, Galen Frazer, illustrated 42 new educational pieces for the book. You can check those out below and also contribute to Rader’s Kickstarter Campaign to help fund the publication of the book. 

 

Rocket Science

Image Via Rocket Science/Andrew Rader/Galen Frazer

 

Rocket Science

Image Via Rocket Science/Andrew Rader/Galen Frazer

 

Rocket Science

Image Via Rocket Science/Andrew Rader/Galen Frazer

 

Feature Image By Galen Frazer From Rocket Science