Tag: children’s literature

Image via Bradenton Herald

This New Children’s Book Celebrates Muslim Women

From posting her artwork on Tumblr and DeviantArt to illustrating a published children’s book, Aaliya Jaleel is starting her illustration career off with a bang.

 

Cheryl Klein, editorial director for the New York-based Lee & Low Books, was searching high and low, for an artist to illustrate for the upcoming children’s book Under my Hijab. The book highlights and focuses on the different ways that hijabs are worn, informing its audience of the cultural significance throughout each story it tells throughout the book. Before being approached to work on Under the Hijab, written by Hena Khan, the only publishing experienced that Aaliya Jaleel had was a small book that she had illustrated and published for an English teacher back when she was at Brighter Horizons Academy in Garland.

 

 

Image via Bradenton Herald

Image via Bradenton Herald

 

 

Despite the daunting nature of illustrating something this big, Jaleel pushed through, hoping she could portray the different reasons and ways that people wear hijabs through her illustrations. Finding different ways to tackle the project, she took on a child’s perspective to accurately depict the characters and their stories within the book. Meeting deadline after deadline, Jaleel and the author work together to edit drafts and sketches. Utilizing different art programs, she used both Procreate and Photoshop to illustrate the book.

 

After finishing Under My Hijab, satisfied and proud of her work, Jaleel is pursuing other projects and has started to work on Muslim Girls Rise, a compilation of the small biographies focusing on progressive Muslim women. The number of Muslim-inspired children’s books is steadily increasing, creating a more diversified selection for children of all backgrounds.

 

Check out some of Aaliya Jaleel’s work and follow her to keep up with her upcoming works!

 

 

Under my Hijab will be available for purchase on January 22, 2019.

 

 

Featured Image Via Bradenton Herald

Image via The New York Times

‘Where the Wild Things Are’ Author Maurice Sendak Lives on with New Children’s Book

Whether he was bringing us along through the jungle with Max and the monsters in Where the Wild Things Are or swimming through giant vats of batter and milk in In the Night Kitchen, beloved children’s author Maurice Sendak always managed to capture the attention and minds of children through his captivating literature and illustrations. During his time on this Earth, he created numerous works for children’s literature.  Though Sendak has passed on, he is lives on with his newly published book entitled Presto & Zesto in Limboland.

 

 

Via Harper Collins

Image via HarperCollins

 

 

Longtime friends, Arthur Yorinks and Maurice Sendak collaborated to create a book from old drawings by Sendak, based on Czech nonsense rhymes which he was commissioned to do in 1990 for a performance of Leos Janacek’s Rikalda, a musical based on Czech nursery rhymes. The book, completed before his death, focuses on the story of two friends in search of a wedding present and cake. The book takes on the two author’s nicknames for one another, Presto and Zesto, the two characters are thrown into a world of complete fantasy. The two witness a sugar beet wedding, meet goats, befriend fire-loving monsters and bagpipes. Arthur Yorinks hopes that the book will showcase how “Friendship makes the oddities of life bearable, and sometimes fun.”

 

 

Via Publisher's Weekly

Image via Publisher’s Weekly

 

 

Featured Image Via The New York Times

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New York Public Library Excited About 2 New Children’s Books Set There!

NYPL is always a big treasure for any book-lovers, and of course, you Bookstrs! Besides its volcano-like collections of books, its half-palace-half-maze building has attracted our attention for a long time. Now, there’re two books about library adventures are making the dreams of sleep-over-at-NYPL come true! 

 

 

As NYPL’s Instagram account celebrates:

 

 

 

 

The two are Lost in the Library: A Story of Patience & Fortitude and The Story Collector: A New York Public Library Book. No matter if you’re children or adults, you much check them out! What follows are short intro of the books from Amazon.

 

 

Lost in the Library: A Story of Patience & Fortitude

Written by Josh Funk and illustrated by Steve Lewis

 

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Image via Macmillan Publishers

 

 

Steadfast Fortitude and curious Patience are waiting every morning to greet visitors of the Library.

That is until, one early morning, when Fortitude finds Patience is missing. The city is about to awake, and the lions absolutely must be in their places before the sun rises. Now, Fortitude must abandon his own post to find his best friend in the Library’s labyrinthine halls.

 

 

The Story Collector: A New York Public Library Book

Written by Kristin O’Donnell Tubb and illustrated by Iacopo Bruno

 

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Image via The New York Public Library Shop – NYPL

 

Eleven-year-old Viviani Fedeler has spent her whole life in the New York Public Library. She knows every room by heart, except the ones her father keeps locked. When Viviani becomes convinced that the library is haunted, new girl Merit Mubarak makes fun of her. So Viviani decides to play a harmless little prank, roping her older brothers and best friend Eva to help out.

But what begins as a joke quickly gets out of hand, and soon Viviani and her friends have to solve two big mysteries: Is the Library truly haunted? And what happened to the expensive new stamp collection? It’s up to Viviani, Eva, and Merit (reluctantly) to find out.

 

 

No matter if it is a lion statue looking for his missing partner in the library before the sunrise, or a brave young girl with her friends exploring the haunted library, the newly published two books make me happy and curious about NYPL! I’ll definitely go check them out after work and you, Booktrs, should do that too 🙂

 

 

 

Featured Image via NYPL’s IG


viola

Viola Davis Discusses How Writing Corduroy Helped Her “Come Back to Life”

Award-winning actress Viola Davis recently wrote Corduroy Takes a Bow in celebration of Don Freeman’s iconic children’s series’ 50th anniversary.

 

The beloved bear introduced in the series’ premiere book, Corduroy, has won the hearts of generations of readers, including Davis. Davis agreed to write the children’s book in large part for her daughter. In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, Davis revealed that the series had been a favorite of her daughter’s and she couldn’t pass up the opportunity to pen a book in the series.

 

“That was the story that stuck. It’s just close to my heart. Certain characters stay with you, and that’s Corduroy.”

 

Corduroy

Image Via Amazon

 

While Corduroy was a factor in Davis’ love of reading, it was her adventures to the library that really drew her into the literary world.

 

“I do remember that book. But when I started reading the book, it was one of several books that I was in love with; it was just the library itself that totally captured me. The smell of the pages. Certainly, Corduroy was a part of that adventure, a bigger part of my escape.”

 

 

Corduroy

Image Via Clipground

 

Corduroy certainly has his own string of adventures, and Corduroy Takes a Bow sees his newfound adventure with his first trip to the theater, a place Davis knows all too well.

 

A graduate of Juilliard, Davis found success on stage through her powerful performances, earning her first Tony Award in 2001 for her role in King Hedley II. Davis applied her familiarity and success in theater throughout her process of writing Corduroy.

 

“I explored every bit of the theater that has left an imprint on me. That’s what I did while I was writing this book. Sometimes you forget that stuff. Sometimes, you need the imagination of a child to come back to life again. To remember why you fell in love with anything.”

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Graeme Mitchell and Amazon

children and it

Jacqueline Wilson’s ‘Four Kids and It’ Film in the Works

Jacqueline Wilson is a distinguished British children’s novelist. Her works explore realist themes like adoption, divorce, mental illness, which sometimes cause controversy. Her stories, especially the Tracy Beaker series, have been adapted into several TV series like The Story of Tracy Beaker, Tracy Beaker Returns, The Dumping Ground, The Tracy Beaker Survival Files.

 

jacky wilson

Image via YouTube

 

is the first time a feature film has been produced of her work. Producer Anne Brogan comments on Wilson’s works that: 

 

We’ve made television singles of two of [Wilson’s] books … This is the first feature film, so she’s naturally very excited…One of the things that makes her stories so perfect when you’re a child reading them … is that [they] are very intimate. They’re very much about the minutiae of children’s lives and their relationships with their parents. Although that works very well for an episodic story form on television, it just doesn’t deliver a big enough story for the screen.

 

Published in 2012,  Four Kids and Iis based on Five Children and It (1902) written by E. Nesbit, a British author and poet. In one interview with The Guardian, Wilson noted that:

 

She [Nesbit] wasn’t above borrowing ideas from other authors, so I didn’t think she’d mind too much if I wrote a modern book … starring her cantankerous magical wish-granting creature, the Psammead…I’m thrilled that it’s going to be a film now. I think families will love seeing how all the wishes go hilariously wrong.

 

Wait, who’s Psammead? Psammead is the “it” in Four Kids and It - a soul character in both Nesbit and Wilson’s stories. Psammead is a magical, sandy, and grumpy creature who Rosalind and Robbie encounter when they are complaining about getting trapped in their dad and “new” mom’s summerhouse with “new” younger sisters: Smash and Maudie. On afternoon, when they go out for picnic, they suddenly dig out Psammead which can make any wish come true. How do the four kids deal with this mysteries creature? How does their oil-and-water sibling relationship go with the development of the plot? I believe those are the heart-warming flickers that you need to check out in Wilson’s book and the upcoming film.

 

So far, the cast of the new movie includes Sir Michael Caine, Bill Nighy, Matthew Goode, and Russel Brand.

 

I’m looking forward to this appealing film adaptation based on Wilson’s delicate story. Are you?

 

 

Featured Image via BBC