Tag: Cersei

8 of Literature Worst Monsters (Who weren’t all that bad)

Who are literature’s worst monsters, but aren’t actually all that bad? Who has a silver lining that we can look into? Who are the almost monsters of literature that are almost terrible but not quite?

Let’s find out!

 

 

8-Vernon Dursley

Vernon Dursley

Image Via Cat and Ellie’s Bookcase – WordPress.com

 

At least Umbridge told Harry the truth! At least she told him that he shouldn’t lie!

Not only did this pig in a human suit lie to Harry, but he abused him since he was a BABY. He’s not even magical.

Objectively, of all the characters from the Harry Potter series, Vernon Dursley is just the worse. He’s human, so we can judge him as much as we want, for keeping a baby in a closet under the stairs for ELEVEN YEARS. Voldemort had the decency to try and kill Harry, Umbridge at least spoke in a nice voice, but Vernon just yelled at him, smacked him around, lied about his parents, and threw him under a closet for ELEVEN YEARS.

To make matters worse, no one called the cops. At least Petunia kept the blanket Harry came in when he was a baby.

At least Umbridge told Harry the truth! At least she told him that he shouldn’t lie!

Voldemort had the decency to try and kill Harry, Umbridge at least spoke in a nice voice, but this pig in a human suit just yelled at him, smacked him around, lied about his parents. At least Aunt Petunia kept the blanket Harry came in when he was a baby. Of all the characters in the Harry Potter series, he’s not even magical, but he’s certainly one of the worse.

OR IS HE?

Horcruxes can influence those around them and Voldemort made one out of Harry. Thus the Dursleys’ dislike of him was exacerbated by Voldemort’s magic.

 

J K Rowling
Image Via Parade

 

Granted, J K Rowling said this:

James was amused by Vernon, and made the mistake of showing it. Vernon tried to patronise James, asking what car he drove. James described his racing broom.

Vernon supposed out loud that wizards had to live on unemployment benefit. James  explained about Gringotts, and the fortune his parents had saved there, in solid gold.

Vernon could not tell whether he was being made fun of or not, and grew angry. The evening ended with Vernon and Petunia storming out of the restaurant, while Lily burst into tears and James (a little ashamed of himself) promised to make things up with Vernon at the earliest opportunity.

Either way, Vernon might not be as bad we thought he is (though he’s still pretty terrible)

 

7-Moby Dick

Moby Dick

Image Via Public Radio International

 

The titular character from Moby Dick, at the end of the day, is a WHALE. It has no concept of good of evil, it’s just a big whale.

 

Captain Ahab

Image Via The Guardian

 

Captain Ahab is the rotten one here. Blame him, not the whale!

 

 

6-Alexandra Finch Hancock

Image result for Aunt Alexandra
Image Via To Kill A Mocking Bird.com

 

While not the worse character in To Kill a Mocking Bird (the real monster is Bob Ewell), Aunt Alexandra is a racist piece of crap. The formidable matriarch of the Finch family, Aunt Alexandra is the king of woman who wears a corset even under her bathrobe. Before she even comes onto the page, Scout compares her to Mount Everest: “throughout my early life, she was cold and there,” but when she comes on the page she far exceeds our expectations of her.

Bossy, hyper-critical, Aunt Alexandra likes thinks done her way or the highway. Imagine the pressure poor Atticus is under when she targets him, taking umbrage with his client, Tom Robinson, noting that the case might endanger the Finch reputation.

She forgoes human decency because of the family. To her, “what is the best for the family” is more important than the family itself.

Aunt Alexandra, in underlining the moral of young Sam Merriweather’s suicide, said it was caused by a morbid streak in the family. Let a sixteen-year-old girl giggle in the choir and Aunty would say, “It just goes to show you, all the Penfield women are flighty.” Everybody in Maycomb, it seemed, had a Streak: a Drinking Streak, a Gambling Streak, a Mean Streak, a Funny Streak.

She’s obsessed with family streaks, hinting that she believes that the Finches are destined to be superior. In a book about racism, the real reason Aunt Alexandra doesn’t think Atticus should take the case are clear.

She also uses it to beat Scout over the head with.

Oh, yeah, Scout is in her line of sights as well. Scout is a tomboy, Aunt Alexandra is a proper lady, the pinnacle of the South. Thus, Alexandria sets to work trying to quash Scout’s tomboyish tendencies and forge a new identity for her.

Aunt Alexandra’s vision of my deportment involved playing with small stoves, tea sets, and wearing the Add-A-Pearl necklace she gave me when I was born; furthermore, I should be a ray of sunshine in my father’s lonely life.

But it’s not just racism, Aunt Alexandra is also a classist. When Scout wants to play with Walter, a poor boy, Aunt Alexandra:

…took off her glasses and stared at me. “I’ll tell you why,” she said. “Because—he—is—trash, that’s why you can’t play with him. I’ll not have you around him, picking up his habits and learning Lord-knows-what.”

 

Image result for Atticus Finch and Aunt Alexandra
Image Via PInterest

 

However, are we judging her too harshly? Is our picture of her incomplete?

After Tom is killed, family affection that looms largest for Aunt Alexandra, telling Miss Maudie:

“I can’t say I approve of everything he does, Maudie, but he’s my brother, and I just want to know when this will ever end. […] It tears him to pieces”

She’s concerned for her brother, standing by him even when she disagrees with him. Make of that what you will, but at least she’s not Bob Ewell, a man so terrible that I’ll bet when Boo Radley killed him no one in town even batted an eye. Not even his daughters.

 

5-Grendel’s Mother

Image result for Grendel's Mother
Image Via ArtStation

 

Depending on your translation of Beowulf, she is either called Grendel’s mother or Grendel’s dam, but I’d liked to call her Mother-whose-son-had-his-arm-ripped off.

I think we can all sit down and agree that Grendel is a monster. He terrorized a village and Beowulf was in the right in defending the town against that monster, but Grendel’s Mommy isn’t that bad. Her son was returned to their cave mortally wounded, one of his two arms (or claws) ripped from its shoulder socket and now hanging in a mead-hall as a grotesque trophy.

Of course she’s going to be mad. And you know what? Good for her for stealing her son’s arm back. Why’d they even want it so bad?

 

Grendel's Mother decapitated

Image Via PInterest

 

But Beowulf just had to come, invading her home, and decapitating her.

Her motive is human and, from her point-of-view, she’s lived there over a hundred years and was never a problem. She just wanted her son’s arm, but they just had to kill her because she was a monster. As Tyrion once said, “I wish I was the monster you think I am!”

 

 

4-Cholly Breedlove

Image Via Baakari Wilder

 

Pecola Beedlove, a young black girl, is routinely mocked by other children for her physical appearance. The only person to find her desirable is her father.

Cholly Breedlove makes this list. To make a long story short, he abuses his wife, he burns down his family home, and repeatedly rapes his own daughter.

But he’s not quite the evilest character Toni Morrison has ever created. In his one and only appearance in The Bluest Eye, we learn quite enough about him that creates a picture of how abusive is cyclical.

 

Cholly Breedlove

Image Via Youtube

 

Abandoned in a junk heap as a baby, Cholly is taken in by two white men who force him to perform sexually for their amusement. When he finally meets his father, he shits his pants.

Thrown in a world where people abuse him, Cholly grows up into a man who doesn’t care about life. He’s free, but he cannot love or be loved. He does what he wants, uncaring for what happens him.

He rapes his daughter to remind himself that he is alive. He rapes her to feel the pain he felt as a child because that’s all he knows. He’s a monster made from monsters who tries to make his own daughter into a monster, all the time thinking ‘monster’ is synonymous with ‘human.’

 

3-Jaime Lannister

Jaime Lannister
Image Via A Wiki of Ice and Fire – Westeros

 

Kingslayer.

Oathbreaker.

Snobbish, rude, Jaime Lannister is in a relationship with his twin sister, Cersei, making three bastards that are set to become Kings and Queens themselves without the actual King Robert none the wiser. He even throws Bran out a window when he catches him having sex with his sister, crippling the boy.

But do I even need to explain why this character from George R R Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire series just isn’t as bad as he sounds?

At the age of fifteen Jaime become the Kingsguard to the Mad King, Aerys II Targaryen. He took an oath to defend the King no matter what, and he broke that oath.

 

Jaime Lannister

Image Via PInterest

 

Yeah, he killed the king, but for two years he witnessed the Mad King’s growing insanity and tendency for burning men alive first hand. One night after burning someone alive, Aerys visited the chambers of his wife and raped her. During this time, Jaime was outside, telling his fellow Kinsguard that they were sworn to protect the queen as well, to which he was told, “but not from him.”

Later, during a rebellion, Aerys devised a plot to burn the entire city to the ground rather than lose it. Upon learning about this plan, the Hand to the King resigned and Aerys burned him alive. Jaime stood back.

When Aerys ordered the city to be burned, Jaime killed everyone involved, including the King, an action which saved the whole city and caused them to hate Jaime for breaking his oath. Even after he was pardoned, even Jon Snow, who “[knows] nothing,” notes that “[t]hey called him the Lion of Lannister to his face and whispered ‘Kingslayer’ behind his back.”

 

2-The Wicked Witch of the west

The Wicked Witch of the West

Image Via THe Vintage News

 

Don’t judge a book by its cover, and don’t judge a witch by their name. Plus, odds are this witch only chose the name because of the alliteration. Ignoring the film adaptation and the musical and book the musical is based on, the original Frank L Baum book introduced her only when some magician tells Dorothy to murder her.

Taking the film into consideration, however, the Wicked Witch is still sympathetic. Dorothy murdered her sister, dropping a house on her head, and then her sister’s body disintegrated. The last thing the Witch has to remember her sister by is a pair of shoes, which Dorothy can’t give her and Glinda refuses to take off her feet.

 

Wicked

Image Via IMDB

 

Imagine if your sibling was murdered and the murderer had their prized heirloom on their feet, refusing to give it you because they didn’t like you. And why doesn’t Dorothy try to talk to the Witch? Is it because she’s Green?

The Witch was in the right. She might not have gone about it the right way, but Dorothy is a murderer hanging out with a discount iron man, a scarecrow (don’t give him any fear toxin), and a lion.

Plus, Wicked, both book and musical changed our minds about this Witch.

 

 

1-The SharkJaws

Image Via Amazon

 

IT’S A SHARK! It has no concept of good of evil, just food and hunger. Both in the Peter Benchley novel and the Steven Spielberg film, it is a big hungry shark.

 

Image Via MovieFanFare

 

The mayor should have closed the beaches. Blame him (or the mob), not the shark.

 

 

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Decider

‘Game of Thrones’ Review: ‘The Long Night’

The latest episode of Game of Thrones was hyped beyond belief. “The Battle for Winterfell” was possibly the most anticipated episode of the season, showcasing the war between the united characters of Westeros (sans Cersei) vs. the White Walkers in what was thought to be a bloodbath of epic proportions, on par with the Red Wedding. But when the episode came roaring onto screens last night, it had some noticeable issues that, in this author’s opinion, prevented it from reaching the heights of true greatness. We’ll delve more deeply into SPOILERS in this review of “The Long Night” but before we do, here’s your chance to turn back now in case you haven’t seen the episode.

So, turn back now! Last warning?

 

Spoilers Ahead!


 

 

Alright, still here. Then let’s take a look at what worked and what didn’t in last night’s epic battle.

 

Danenyrus and Jon Snow stand on the wall of Winterfell, staring at the army of torches in the distance
IMAGE VIA THE ATLANTIC

The opening moments of the battle start off grinding out the tension. The defenders of Winterfell stand assembled. Grey Worm stands before the gates, standing stalwart with his fellow Unsullied. Jamie Lannister, Brienne of Tarth, Podrick Payne, Tormund Giantsbane, Samwell Tarly, Sandor Clegane, Beric Dondarrion, Jorah Mormont, Davos Seaworth, Ghost, and Lyanna Mormont stand among their ranks. Arya and Sansa Stark stand tall on the walls. Tyrion Lannister and Gilly hide underneath Winterfell in the crypts with the common citizens. The dragons circle overhead. Jon Snow and Daenerys Targaryen finally stand side by side on the highest point of the keep, staring ahead into the darkness beyond. Its so quiet you can hear a pin drop as the tension is ratcheted up beyond belief, as the characters stare off from the sanctuary of Winterfell, unable to see into the darkness beyond, waiting…waiting…for something to happen.

Melisandre arrives presently (nice to see you again!) and although Davos doesn’t trust her, he allows her inside. Melisandre gifts the soldiers of Winterfell with the blessing of the Lord of Light, making their swords alight with flame similar to Beric’s own. The army then charges off to meet the army of the dead and flaming cannonballs are fired off. They strike something ahead, engulfing the battlefield with pockets of light…showcasing a HUGE tide of wights coming out of the darkness. What follows next is one of the episode’s brilliant moments, as the POV switches back to Winterfell, with the sea of torches visible in the distance. One by one, with no sound, the torches go out. The terror at this situation is boldly felt and captures the horror of the White Walkers without them even being seen. A great artistic choice, well done!

 

 

Arya Stark fights wildly for survival as zombies surround her

Image via Vox

But that’s when the episode takes a sharp left turn towards incomprehensibility. As the wights swarm Winterfell en masse, the defenders rush out to meet them. What should be a great/terrifying action scene is unfortunately marred by one fact: you can’t see what’s happening! Between the very dark lighting, the fast paced editing, and the chaotic style of the melee itself, the action is downright incomprehensible. You can’t see what’s happening onscreen, which is problematic to follow the characters who are in real mortal peril fighting for their lives against the surge of the undead. This is a problem that pervades throughout the entire episode and unfortunately, one that brings it down considerably. Its almost impossible to tell what’s happening onscreen throughout the battle through much of its runtime and considering the sheer scale of the battle itself, this is a huge problem. We want to see what’s happening! We want to see who lives and dies! But whether through design or error, you simply can’t throughout ‘The Long Night’.

Some of these moments were obviously intentional, such as when the Night King arrives and his Walkers conjure an enormous blizzard to blind the dragons as Jon and Daenerys pursue him. This scene captures the frantic pursuit very well, being very hard to see as the dragons race around desperately through the blizzard, getting attacked at points by the Night King atop his zombie dragon and only providing brief moments of relief as the two exit the blizzard. But at other points, you simply can’t tell what’s going on, such as when Grey Worm and the Unsullied defend the gate, Jamie and Brienne fighting desperately on the walls against the endless tide, or when Arya is sneaking around inside Winterfell, trying to avoid lurking wights. The episode is unfortunately undercut by the fact that we can’t see any of it.

 

Bedric wields a flaming sword in the crypt of Winterfell
IMAGE VIA WINTER IS COMING

You could argue it is a stylistic choice in order to capture the chaotic pace of medieval warfare. However, previous episodes such as “Battle of the Bastards” embrace this as well and they weren’t nearly as visually hard to follow. You can blend the chaotic style of medieval warfare with comprehensible cinematography without an issue, as previously shown, but this episode just couldn’t do it for whatever reason.

Still, this episode was full of cool moments when we could see them. Lyanna Mormont’s death scene was a tearjerking highlight, as she faces down an undead giant that smashes its way through the gates. The monster begins butchering soldiers and slaps the little girl aside. But Lyanna gets right back up and with a scream of a warrior, charges back in towards the towering monster. The giant grabs her and begins crushing her but Lyanna, with her last breath, stabs the beast with a dragon glass dagger, killing the giant at the cost of her own life. RIP, Lyanna, you went out like a boss!

 

The Night King stands tall in a towering inferno
IMAGE VIA IGN

Other great moments included Sansa and Tyrion’s heart-to-heart scenes in the crypts as the battle raged overhead, bringing their relationship closer as they spoke of how they were nearly married, the dragon fight as Jon Snow took on the Night King’s undead mount in a midair duel to the death, and Jon Snow attempting to kill the Night King himself only to be stopped by a wall of zombies that the Night King raises from the corpses of the battlefield. The last stand of Theon Greyjoy was also a great moment of the character, as Theon faced down dozens of wights to defend Bran, getting a solemn thank you from Bran as his former brother told him he was a good man. Theon then ran at the Night King himself, only to be gutted and died. A great ending of the character and another badass exit.

Still, despite what viewers thought would be a bloodbath of an episode, there really weren’t that many ‘big’ deaths. Theon Greyjoy, of course, has been a pivotal part of the show but his importance has waned with time and he was much more of a side character in the lead up to his demise. Lyanna Mormont’s death of course was heartbreaking, but she was never a main cast member, just a member of the supporting cast to whom viewers grew attached (for good reason). Beric Dondarrion also perished but his status as a cast member is quite similar to Lyanna. Melisandre walked her last at the episode’s end but she too had been dwindling in importance and the fact that was the first time she showed up in a long while undermined her death scene, as it appeared she appeared out of the blue simply to die. Arguably the ‘biggest’ death was Jorah Mormont, who died defending Daenerys from endless waves of zombies, but even he wasn’t a main cast member either. Everyone who was on the A-list came away relatively scott-free, without even any serious injuries to show for it. Even characters who arguably should have died— i.e: Sansa and Tyrion trapped in the crypts with the undead, Samwell buried in an avalanche of wights, and Jamie and Brienne overrun by wights— survived. Honestly, it’s a little disappointing that not a single main cast member perished, especially considering Game of Thrones’s reputation of killing anyone, everyone, no matter who they are. Perhaps we overhyped ourselves but still…its disappointing nonetheless.

 

IMAGE VIA IGN

Of course, the most controversial moment will be the death of the Night King himself. The big guy perished at the hands of Arya, who shanks him with her dagger, causing the Night King to quite suddenly explode, with his entire army of zombies falling apart with his death. It is a sudden, jarring moment, perhaps somewhat anti-climatic, but one that feels more in line with the show’s desire to subvert audience expectations. One hopes we’ll learn a bit more about the White Walkers now that they’re gone, as the Night King and his troops never showed their motivations nor any real personality traits. They were just evil and while that certainly made them threatening, it would be a disappointment if they didn’t have much else going for them.

It seems now Cersei will become the threat for the reminder of the season. We’ll have to wait to see what happens but it be a bit sour to have the supposedly main threat offed and a smaller, more petty threat take his place. Still, we’re sure the showrunners have something up their sleeves.

The Battle for Winterfell proved to be a rather mixed bag. With the lighting issues, lack of character deaths, and the death of the Night King sorted in with a truly epic scale and great moments this one isn’t bad but perhaps fell short of true greatness. We can only hope Cersei proves herself to be just as a threat as the Night King’s forces but we’ll have to see.

What were your thoughts on the episode?

 

 

Featured Image Via Vox 

The Top 5 Most Incredible ‘Game of Thrones’ Battles

To celebrate the premiere of Game of Thrones’s first episode, let’s turn our eyes to the past. While Game of Thrones is known for layered characters, political intrigue, and unexpected deaths, its no doubt the series has some kickass action scenes too. Its eye for spectacle has only grown since the show’s early days, creating massive battle scenes that normally would be reserved for an epic movie like Lord of the RingsHere are (in our opinion) the top five best ones!

 

5. daenerys attacks the Lannisters 

 

A dragon flies low over a battlefield, roasting soldiers with its flaming breath

Image Via Vulture

This attack came out of nowhere, both for the audience and the characters. Following House Lannister’s victory over the Tyrells, the Lannister caravan, led by Jamie and Bronn were returning home with loot they had taken from Highgarden. That’s when the ambush happened: Dothraki forces charged over the grasslands, attacking the Lannister caravan en masse. Then Daenerys herself descended on the back of her dragon, Drogon, and unleashed Hell on the soldiers below. The terrifying results of a dragon attack are realized first hand, as the action follows Bronn stumbling through the flaming wreckage of the attack, stumbling past his fellow soldiers burning alive in a scene of complete chaos and frenzy. Only Bronn managed to shoot Drogon with a lucky shot drives the dragon off, but no before Jamie charges the dragon with spear in hand, a badass moment even if he doesn’t succeed and nearly drowns for his troubles.

 

4. The Massacre of Hardhome 

 

Jon Snow prepares to cross swords with an undead White Walker

Image Via Winter is Coming

The moment where Game of Thrones truly showcased the threat of the White Walkers, the undead army descended upon the fishing village of Hardhome in force. As the Night King watched like some sort of dark god from the cliffs above, the wights were unleashed upon the village, overwhelming the wildlings and slaughtering everything in sight. Filmed as chaotically as possible, the sequence captured the unstoppable nature of the enemy first hand and allowed Jon to duel a White Walker one on one amidst the frenzy. And of course, the unforgettable image of the Night King raising all the villagers he’d just killed as zombified servants in the battle’s aftermath will forever linger in our minds.

 

3. Battle of Castle Black

 

Jon Snow faces off against wildling attackers amidst the flaming assault on a castle

Image Via The Daily Beast

This one was one for the books. A battle so huge and massive an entire episode was devoted to showcasing it in all its glory, the Battle of Castle Black featured the wildlings assault the Wall, facing off against the badly outmatched forces of the Night’s Watch. Crowd pleasing moments were flowing from the episode: giant mammoths! A huge scythe bursting from the Wall to sweep off wildling climbers! The death of Ygritte! And of course, the epic tracking shot that followed all the major characters through the battle, showcasing their individual struggles amidst the madness. This one is pure excitement and features some of the best action the show has ever had.

 

2. The Battle of the Bastards

 

Jon Snow sits amidst a pile of corpses as he struggles to break free

Image Via Hollywood Reporter

The showdown with Ramsay Snow was built up off over multiple seasons, with the audience growing more and more desperate to see the evil man meet his end. And the Battle of the Bastards did not disappoint. Jon Snow leads his forces against Ramsay’s own to retake Winterfell from House Bolton and the action kicked off from there. The visual component truly captures the frantic combat of a battle scene, with Jon stumbling around the battlefield, swiping madly at opponents as horses charge, men die, and the entire scene turns into a blur. At one point, Bolton forces trap his army and as the bodies pile up, Jon Snow is nearly buried in an avalanche of corpses. This leads to the crowd cheering moment when Sansa arrives to save him, leading to the routing of Bolton forces back to Winterfell and Jon finally beating the utter crap out of Ramsay. The aftermath of the battle was even sweeter: watching Sansa take revenge on Ramsay and allowing the sadistic villain to be eaten alive by his own dogs.

 

1. The Battle of Blackwater

 

Image Via Bustle

The first of Game of Throne’s epic battle scenes and ultimately, still the best. Pitting Stannis Baratheon against the Lannisters, our sympathy and focus ultimately goes to Tyrion, whose trying to defend his home despite the machinations of his relatives. The battle featured one of the most iconic moments of the series, where Bronn, at Tyrion’s orders, ignites wildfire in the bay and blows almost all of Stannis’s fleet to Hell. Of course, the battle isn’t over yet, Stannis leading the reminders of his forces onto the beach and laying siege to the keep. He almost gets inside too, but Tywin arrives at the last minute, saving King’s Landing and getting credit. But we all know Tyrion was the real hero of the day. Blackwater set the standard for what was to come but still holds up today and we’ll never forget the images and the tension it crafted.

What are your favorite Game of Thrones battles? Tell us in the comments!

 

 

Featured Image Via Game of Thrones Wiki 

All the Ways ‘Game of Thrones’ New Intro Hints at What’s to Come

The opening credits of Game of Thrones serve as a guide to the physical landscape of the series, changing with each episode to show not only the actors involved but also the places in which they’ll be. With this in mind, it’s no surprise that the intro to Season 8’s premiere is different from previous intros— but this intro is definitely most drastic update yet, and hints at many things to come.

So let’s talk about it.

 

Cersei, Bran, and Arya - then and now

Image Via IGN

The most surface-level change to the intro is the animation is no longer colored with the bright golds and reds of the previous credits, but is now uses a darker, richer color palette. It’s a somber look, predicting the darkness to come.

Besides the color scheme, the intro is basically the same in the first few frames, so much so that your eyes flit past it. We see the small sun contained within an armilla that metaphorically depicts major events in Game of Thrones history – we’ve seen this before.

 

Game of Thrones Intro Season 8-The Wall

Image Via Polygon

Then we zoom to the map, and personally my eyes just shot open wide. We see the wall with its giant hole where the decimated Eastwatch used to stand. Ouch. Thanks for the reminder. Following this we a series of blue tiles that lead towards Last Hearth, the ancestral seat of House Umber. They’re dead, and this map shows us our worst fears: the White Walkers are on a collision course with Winterfell.

 

Game of Thrones Intro Season 8-Winterfell

Image Via The Verge

Happy thoughts, happy thoughts.

Honestly, I would have just started here, but I get it: We need to fill a minute and a half of screen-time with SOMETHING to accompany Ramin Djawadi’s sweeping music.

Thirty seconds in we hustle over to Winterfell and at thirty-five seconds we rush back inside our favorite castle. Ooo, that’s new.

 

Game of Thrones Intro Season 8-Winterfell's Crypt

Image Via Polygon

After wandering around the Great Hall, we found ourselves inside the crypt at fifty seconds in. The looming shadows, the lanterns that light our way but don’t illuminate anything, it’s all very unsettling. Is something going to happen there? We shall see.

Break my heart, why don’t you? It’s only fifty-five seconds into the intro and you know what I see? Upon the armilla band, engraved in gold because they just want to hurt our little hearts, is a pivotal moment in Game of Thrones history. What is it, you may ask? Well, there’s a crouched hungry lion, the wolf torn apart with arrows, and the man holding up a severed wolf head.

 

Game of Thrones Intro Season 8-Red Wedding

Image Via Popsugar

Go from a crypt to a depiction of the Red Wedding, why don’t cha?

From here, of course, we head over to King’s Landing. At a minute and ten seconds in we see the courtyard map from Season 7, symbolically reminding us that Cersei is out for Number One: herself.

A minute and twenty seconds in we see a dragon skull in King’s Landing. Hey, I get it. I think the Dragon Queen and Cersei (this might be a stretch) might not get along this season. But I’m just spit balling.

 

Bart Simpson writing"I'm not here on a spitball scholarship"

The Non Sequitur

Don’t go shaking your head, there might be something to that theory. Going to a minute and thirty seconds into the video and you’ll see the Iron Throne with the Lion sigil — a nod that Cersei is now in control – but for how long?

 

Game of Thrones Intro Season 8-The Iron Throne

Image Via Popsugar

To build up the pressure, after we see the Iron Throne with the Lion sigil we go straight to  the armilla depicting three dragons below a comet. If you recall this event from Game of Thrones history, you’ll know Danearys took this comet as a sign that she would end up victorious.

From we here we see Game of Thrones. Because that’s what this show is about: people battling each other for a big chair. You know what? Let’s focus on this Cersei VS Danearys fight. Heck, it might give us our long awaited Cleganebowl. What could possibly go wrong?

 

Night King's Landing

Image Via Youtube

Maybe. Maybe not. Watch the video and tell me your thoughts!

 

 

Featured Image Via Popsugar