Tag: Buffy the Vampire Slayer

Fictional Libraries We Wish Were Real

Hogwarts LibraryHarry Potter

 

image via pinterest

The Hogwarts library is by far the most well-known when it comes to modern literature and pop culture. Our favorite trio of student wizards often sought out answers to problems from books in the library (magical stones, spells to breathe underwater, regular teenage stuff). Who among us didn’t dream of attending Hogwarts? Or of sneaking into the restricted section of the library under a cloak of invisibility?

 

Image via RadioTimeS

Beast’s Librarybeauty and the beast

 

Image via Telegraph

This library, literally from a fairytale, is as dreamy as you can imagine! Were you as shocked and surprised as bookworm Belle when you first saw the Beast’s library? Who wasn’t jealous of her for being gifted this incredible room? It almost makes the whole hostage thing okay.

 

 

Jedi archives, star wars

 

Image via Scyfilove

Just imagine historical records dating back thousands of years, with maps and geographical archives of entire galaxies. This library literally contained ALL the information about cultures and species spanning centuries of time and space. All of that knowledge in one place sounds like the most complete library to ever exist (in our minds, at least).

 

 

the library, Doctor who

 

Image via Pinterest

 

A planet-sized library containing every book ever written? Sounds like the perfect planet to me. It even has a teleportation system to ensure that you can find your next read with immense speed. I can’t think of a better planet to live in than this one!

Sunnydale high library, buffy the vampire slayer

 

Image via Fandom

The nostalgia is creeping in with this 90’s cult classic. Who didn’t want to have old supernatural texts and medieval weapons in their school library? So many emotional moments happened to the Scooby Gang in this very spot. With a library like that, we definitely wouldn’t mind staying after school to study.

 

Erudite headquarters, The divergent series

 

Image via Amino Apps

Described as a large library with bookshelves covering the walls, the compound is where Erudite members study and work in their expertise: knowledge. Thought to be set in a dystopian version of Chicago’s Millenium Park, we’re pretty sure this tops the “Bean” sculpture when it comes to tourism.

 

Image via Fandom

 

The breakfast club libraryThe Breakfast club

 

Image via Zimbio

The Breakfast Club library was where a brain, an athlete, a basketcase, a princess, and a criminal found out they weren’t so different after all. Not only did this movie give us all the feels, but it sort of made us want to be sent to detention. This one’s less about the books and more about the iconic moments and relationships built amongst them.

Which library do you wish was real? Check out the video in full here.

Featured Image via Fandom


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Angel Returns in New Comic Series!

Buffy The Vampire Slayer may be over, but the series does live on as part of a rebooted comic book series by BOOM! Studios. The comic book is a reimagining of the series featuring the same characters but in a modern day setting.

 

Fans of the series are in for a treat next week: the return of fan-favorite Angel.

 

Image Via Pinterest

 

Buffy #4, coming out on April 17th, will introduce the character popularized by David Boreanaz to the new series. In addition, a new spin off series of comics centered around the character will release on the same day.

 

Image Via The New York Times

 

The official description for Angel #0 reads:

 

“Meet Angel – a vampire cursed with a soul who has spent centuries protecting humanity from the monsters that lurk in the dark…including himself. Now, looking for redemption for the atrocities committed by the monster he was when he was first turned at the age of 18, Angel stumbles upon a new demon uprising and a shocking truth: The restoration of his humanity can only come if he takes one more life: a certain Slayer from Sunnydale who he’s never met…but may now be his greatest enemy.”

 

Image Via The New York Times

 

The new issue will be released exclusively in print, which BOOM! Studios VP of Marketing Arune Singh wants to use to drive interest:

 

“We looked at this as a natural story point where we could launch an Angel series from Buffy #4, so let’s create that excitement purely as a comic book store event,”

 

Any Buffy fans here excited for this news?

 

 

Featured Image Via TV Insider

buffy

6 Chilling Book Recommendations Based On Your Favorite Spooky TV Shows

We love Halloween- it’s scary, campy, and you can be whatever you want to be (which you can mostly do all the time, unless what you want to be is a ghoul or a sexier version of something decidedly unsexy). Unfortunately, getting down to the last episode of your favorite show is not the fun kind of scary. But if your show is on this list, here are some spooky, whacky, and genuinely frightening reads to tide you over.

 

 

Buffy the Vampire Slayer

 

The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

 

 

Those of us with Buffy nostalgia face a challenge that can be scarier than the show itself- the fact that the show’s been finished since 2003. But if you can’t live without the misadventures of the teens quietly (and sometimes NOT so quietly) defending Sunnydale from monsters, why not explore an untold part of that story?

 

Patrick Ness’ The Rest of Us Just Live Here explores the lives of background characters in a nondescript town like Sunnydale for those of us who have never fought a vampire with our bare hands (or, you know, with anything else). Teenagers beset with their own slew of issues try to exist as the Chosen Ones deal with their zombie cops and spooky blue lights from outer space. This genre-bending book merges fantasy with reality as Ness explores how ordinary human lives fit in with the high stakes of genre fiction.

 

 

Supernatural

 

Vicious by V.E. Schwab

 

 

Unlike with Buffy, anyone who watches Supernatural knows there’s no shortage of content. Now entering its fourteenth season, the cult classic has thrilled viewers since 2005 with its story of two inseparable brothers who save lives, hunt monsters, make questionable choices, and fight with each other nonstop.

 

V.E. Schwab’s Vicious is a twist on the typical superhero story, following two former classmates who were once as close as brothers. When a string of bad decisions puts the friends in uncomfortably close contact with the world of the supernatural, some lives are saved- and others are lost. The mercurial relationship between Schwab’s protagonists may remind you of Supernatural‘s infamous brothers, and the hunting definitely will.

 

 

Stranger Things

 

It by Stephen King

 

 

This hit TV show taps into 80s nostalgia in a serious way, and so modern books just won’t always sate your craving. You can take the edge off this with a book with the story that inspired last fall’s pop culture phenomenon: Stephen King’s IT.

 

Written in 1990 and set in the mid 80s, the story also focuses on a gang of kids taking on a threat that adults in town don’t understand. Featuring a familiar camaraderie, the Losers try to stop the entity that they have discovered, attempting to save both their town and themselves. And is there collateral damage? Well, isn’t there always?

 

The Walking Dead

 

Zone One by Colson Whitehead

 

 

Zombies might seem to be the territory of genre fiction and pop culture, but that isn’t always the case. Literary superstar Colson Whitehead’s Zone One blends genre and literary fiction as it explores not the zombie apocalypse exactly, but what happens after.

 

With the mixture of tenderness and violence that viewers expect from The Walking Dead, Whitehead explicitly wanders into the thematic landscape of zombies, discussing at length the kind of moral and existential questions that many zombie stories only hint at.

 

American Horror Story

 

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

 

 

It might be hard to decide what will get you your AHS fix, given the wide range of premises the show offers. Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus shares a similar versatility, blending elements of magic and witchcraft (like AHS season 3) with the creepy aesthetic of a sinister traveling circus (season 4). With a flair for the strange, cruel, and dramatic, The Night Circus’ range of amoral characters and tragically doomed human connections are reminiscent of all seasons of AHS.

 

Black Mirror

Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

 

 

While not explicitly a horror show, Black Mirror’s one-off dystopian plot lines terrify audiences with their creativity… and plausibility. Often focusing on motifs of alienation and technology, the show provides us with a horrifying reality that we both can and cannot imagine. A YA classic, Scott Westerfeld’s Uglies depicts a dystopian world in which, on their sixteenth birthday, teenagers undergo surgery to become Pretties- artificially enhanced beautiful people with equally beautiful lives (sounds exactly like being sixteen, right?). Unfortunately, life is not quite as beautiful as it appears. And unfortunately, that’s not all the surgery does.

 

 

Featured Image Via 2glory.de. All in-text images via Amazon.