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Ponden Hall

Home That Inspired Brontë’s ‘Wuthering Heights’ Is For Sale

Confucius once said,” The strength of a nation derives from the integrity of the home.” This would lead one to believe that England was in deep shit when Emily Brontë wrote her gothic masterpiece Wuthering Heights. Not the most optimistic of tales, and definitely not propaganda for any time-travelers wanting to visit Victorian England, Heights depicts a homefront cake full of dysfunction, mental and physical illness with a supernatural cherry on top. It’s basically a version of The Bachelor where alcohol and drugs (I mean c’mon) are not readily available and Chris Harrison is clinically depressed.

The story follows Heathcliff—one name— basically the original Cher, and his love interest/adoptive sister Catherine Earnshaw. The two estates in the novel are the antithesis of one another: Thrushcross Grange and Wuthering Heights.

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Wuthering Heights book cover depicting house on moor
IMAGE VIA AMAZON.COM

When Emily Brontë and her sisters were young, they visited an estate called Ponden Hall, located in Haworth, West Yorkshire. The property is believed to have inspired the work of all three Brontës ; in particular, it is believed to be the setting of the famous scene in Wuthering Heights where the narrator, Lockwood, encounters Catherine’s ghost after trying to close a noisy window.

Excerpt from Chapter 3:

 ‘I must stop it, nevertheless!’ I muttered, knocking my knuckles through the glass, and stretching an arm out to seize the importunate branch; instead of which, my fingers closed on the fingers of a little, ice-cold hand! The intense horror of nightmare came over me: I tried to draw back my arm, but the hand clung to it, and a most melancholy voice sobbed, ‘Let me in—let me in!’ ‘Who are you?’ I asked, struggling, meanwhile, to disengage myself. ‘Catherine Linton,’ it replied, shiveringly (why did I think of Linton? I had read Earnshaw twenty times for Linton) ‘ I’ve come home: I’d lost my way on the moor!’ As it spoke, I discerned, obscurely, a child’s face looking through the window. Terror made me cruel; and, finding it useless to attempt shaking the creature off, I pulled its wrist on to the broken pane, and rubbed it to and fro till the blood ran down and soaked the bedclothes: still it wailed, ‘Let me in!’ and maintained its tenacious gripe, almost maddening me with fear.

 

Wildfell Hall, which may have inspired by Ponden Hall, in the engraving by Edmund Morison Wimperis.

GettyImages-606243066.jpg
IMAGES VIA SMITHSONIANMAG.COM

Ponden Hall’s current owners, Julie Akhurst and Steve Brown, have used the building as a bed and breakfast experience for Brontë enthusiasts since 1998 and are now trying to sell it for £1.25 million ($1.6 million). The two are downsizing, apparently, not running away due to various bumps in the night. Waaaay before them, it was owned by the Heatons (friends of the Brontës). Ponden Hall’s library was visited often by the Brontës. Julie Akhurst spoke on that fact:

“It’s incredible to think Emily would have sat here reading. We have a catalogue of the books that were here then and they probably influenced her. There were gothic novels and books on necromancy and dark magic.”

Brontë experts acknowledge Ponden Hall’s architectural similarities with both Thrushcross Grange and Wuthering Heights…but mostly Wuthering Heights. So if by some miracle your credit limit has been increased to £1.25 million or $1.6 million, buy yourself a creepy guest house. Just ignore the voices.

Fine Country has listed Ponden Hall and I apologize if this article cramps the realtor’s style—own the gothic vibe, my friend. Own it.

 

Featured Image Via Lonelyplanet.com

Painting

Check out These 7 Photos of Famous Authors’ Diaries

Lets face it, it’s really wrong to read someone else’s diary. It crosses all sorts of boundaries that you don’t want to cross. It also makes you completely untrustworthy and kind of a piece of shit, unless of course the diary belongs to one of our favourite authors. Then it’s totally okay.

 

The main difference between diary entires written before the great wave of Facebook and Twitter and those written after is that before people started offloading every little detail of their lives onto their public profiles, writers actually wrote concisely what they really feel into their diary. It wasn’t a chore, like “Oh man, I should have journaled today.” It wasn’t for others to read, it was a way to organise your life or share your deepest and darkest.

 

Here are some photographs of author’s diaries, ranging from Jack Kerouac to Charlotte Brontë.

 

1. Charlotte Brontë’s Diary

 

Bronte

Image Via Pinterest

 

2. Jack Kerouac’s Notebook

 

Kerouac

Image Via StumbleUpon

 

3. John Steinbeck’s Journal Page

 

Steinbeck

Image Via The Morgan Library

 

4. Leonardo da Vinci’s Copious Notes

 

Da Vinci

Image Via Twitter

 

5. David Foster Wallace’s Draft of The Pale King.

 

Wallace

Image Via Stumble Upon

 

6. Jennifer Egan’s Journal

 

Egan

Image Via Stumble Upon

 

7. Notes of Issac Newton

 

Newton

Image Via Pinterest

 

Bonus: The Diary of Frida Kahlo

 

Frida

Image Via Twitter

 

Frida clearly wins most beautiful and imaginative diary award, followed closely by David Foster Wallace, who, for some reason, I was not expecting such beautiful handwriting from.

 

Feature Image Via The New Yorker

Image Via Hark! A Vagrant!

10 Wildly Dramatic Quotes From Mad Masterpiece ‘Wuthering Heights’

Emily Brontë’s classic novel Wuthering Heights has to be one of the most dramatic texts on this planet. The characters’ erratic behavior and outrageous declarations are unmatched in terms of high drama, especially when it comes to matters of the heart. Here are ten of the most genuinely crazy quotes from the beloved, creepy, obsessive little weirdos of Brontë’s mad masterpiece.

 

Image Via Hark! A Vagrant

Image Via Hark! A Vagrant

 

1. “He shall never know I love him: and that, not because he’s handsome, but because he’s more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made out of, his and mine are the same.” 

 

2. “If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger.” 

 

3. “If he loved with all the powers of his puny being, he couldn’t love as much in eighty years as I could in a day.” 

4. “If you ever looked at me once with what I know is in you, I would be your slave.” 

5. “My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods: time will change it, I’m well aware, as winter changes the trees. My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Healthcliff! He’s always, always in my mind: not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being.” 

6. “You know that I could as soon forget you as my existence!” 

7. “I have to remind myself to breathe — almost to remind my heart to beat!” 

8. “It is hard to forgive, and to look at those eyes, and feel those wasted hands,’ he answered. ‘Kiss me again; and don’t let me see your eyes! I forgive what you have done to me. I love my murderer—but yours! How can I?” 

9. “Heaven did not seem to be my home; and I broke my heart with weeping to come back to earth; and the angels were so angry that they flung me out into the middle of the heath on the top of Wuthering Heights; where I woke sobbing for joy.” 

10. “And I pray one prayer–I repeat it till my tongue stiffens–Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living! You said I killed you–haunt me, then!…Be with me always–take any form–drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you!” 

 

Via Giphy

Via Giphy

 

Featured Image Via Hark! A Vagrant!