Tag: booklovers

Coronavirus Chaos: An Update From Bookstr

We, at Bookstr, wish all of our readers courage, safety, and health amidst the coronavirus pandemic. While we self-isolate (and read more than ever!), we will be focusing on the following: 

  • Supporting book lovers in helping them find new ways to get through, and keeping their love and passion for reading alive during this uncertain time.
  • Supporting the independent businesses that are going to be disproportionately affected like independent bookstores and publishers.
  • Creating articles featuring authors and books that will help people in managing their well-being.
  • Creating ways for authors and publishers to reach the audience now that there will be a pause on things like book signings. 
  • Helping maintain community and support through the book loving community.
  • Lastly, trying to help create a sense of normalcy by continuing to create fun content.

At a time like this, a lot of people need support, and the book community is no exception.

Below are a couple of businesses that we think you should keep an eye on, and support where you can!

Sausalito Books by The Bay, The Strand, Shakespeare and Co., Silent Book Club (hosting social distancing-friendly meet ups!), Books Upstairs.

Your local bookstore would definitely appreciate an online order, a gift card purchase, or even just words of encouragement!

These are crazy times, and this is an experience wholly unprecedented.Stay safe, stay healthy, stay sane (as much as you can!) and happy reading.

feature image via bookstr

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nypl

InstaNovels: The New York Public Library Is Bringing Classic Tales to Your Instagram Stories

This must be one of the most brilliant ideas of the last decade. ❤ ❤ ❤

 

According to Electric Literature, New York Public Library is redefining what a “story” is by making the Instagram stories more “readable” and “storytelling” which a service is called “InstaNovels.” Unlike the common usage of Instagram stories (people sharing their daily lives, dogs, birthdays, selfies, you name it), InstaNovels will bring classic literature to your Instagram stories. From Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carol, The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, to The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, you will start being able to read these classics on Instagram!

 

What make them surprisingly accessible is that each classic is GIF-illustrated by well-known artists: Magoz (@magoz) for Alice, Buck (@buck_design) for Wallpaper, and César Pelizer (@cesarpelizer) for Metamorphosis.

 

 

a

Image via electricliterature

 

From August 22nd, on NYPL’s IG account literature-lovers can check these stories out. Entering the story, first you will see the creative GIF illustration as the book cover; then, you tip the screen as you usually do to get to the next story where the content of the book is; after that, you are officially into the story.

 

Electric Literature suggests that the font, colors, and design elements of the story are optimized for a better reading experience: a beige background is good for eyes; the Georgia typeface makes the long text reading easier; on the right bottom there’s a place “Thumb here” by which you pause the page and read the text. One cute thing is: with the pages turned further, the “Thumb here” will gradually become a blue tiny cyclops! 

 

 

aa

Image via electricliterature

 

y

Image via NYPL

 

m

Image via NYPL

 

 

InstaNovels is actually an add-on idea to the original philosophy of Instagram’s story function. Corinna Falusi, the chief creative officer in Mother, the creative agency of this program, said in a press release:

 

Instagram unknowingly created the perfect bookshelf for this new kind of online novel. From the way you turn the pages, to where you rest your thumb while reading, the experience is already unmistakably like reading a paperback novel…We have to promote the value of reading, especially with today’s threats to American system of education.

 

 

 

 

Don’t you think this is a fantastically fabulous form of reading classic literature? While writing this article, I checked InstaNovel and was totally amazed by its cute story interface and creative core value. Go check it out and you’ll feel less guilty when you squander hours scrolling through Instagram “stories.”

 

 

Featured Image Via NYPL

5 of Your Favorite Bookworm Characters from Literature!

August 9th is Book Lovers Day! As a book-obsessed kid, I often found myself latching on to bookworms within the books themselves. It’s awesome to read a book and find your own passions reflected in a character. Here are a few amazing book lovers we find in our pages (and screens)!

 

 

 


 

 

Hermione Granger

(Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling)

hermione

Image Via Pintrest

 

[…] She was dashing back, an enormous old book in her arms.

“I never thought to look in here!” she whispered excitedly. “I got this out of the library weeks ago for a bit of light reading.”

Light?” said Ron, but Hermione told him to be quiet.

 

 


 

 

Matilda Wormwood

(Matilda by Roald Dahl)

matilda

Image Via Stylist

 

“So Matilda’s strong young mind continued to grow, nurtured by the voices of all those authors who had sent their books out into the world like ships on the sea. These books gave Matilda a hopeful and comforting message: You are not alone.” 

 

 


 

 

Tyrion Lannister

(A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin)

tyrion

Image Via ThoughtCatalogue

 

“I have a realistic grasp of my own strengths and weaknesses. My mind is my weapon. My brother has his sword, King Robert has his warhammer, and I have my mind… and a mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge. That’s why I read so much, Jon Snow.” 

 

 


 

 

Liesel Meminger

(The Book Thief by Markus Zusak)

liesel

Image Via Pintrest

 

“She said it out loud, the words distributed into a room that was full of cold air and books. Books everywhere! Each wall was armed with overcrowded yet immaculate shelving. It was barely possible to see paintwork. There were all different styles and sizes of lettering on the spines of the black, the red, the gray, the every-colored books. It was one of the most beautiful things Liesel Meminger had ever seen.

With wonder, she smiled.

That such a room existed!” 

 

 


 

 

Klaus Baudelaire

(A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket)

klaus

Image Via The UPOU Book Club

 

“Klaus sighed, and opened a book, and as at so many other times when the middle Baudelaire child did not want to think about his circumstances, he began to read.” 

 

 


 

Belle

(Beauty and the Beast)

belle

Image Via Oh My Disney

 

“Look there she goes, that girl is so peculiar
I wonder if she’s feeling well
With a dreamy, far-off look
And her nose stuck in a book
What a puzzle to the rest of us is Belle…”

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Wattpad

moonrise kingdom

15 Book-Themed Instagrams to Enrich Your Feed

You know that feeling you get in the pit of your stomach as you’re nearing the end of a really good book; that growing sense of excitement to see how it all unfolds, that thrill of feeling so deeply invested in a life other than your own, and that impending, dark-cloud feeling of “oh no, what will I do after?” knowing that your time with these characters is drawing to an end?

 

I think we grow so close to the characters in the books we read because it’s the only time we are truly invited to enter the world of someone other than ourselves; we see their inner monologue, their every word, thought, and emotion, everything they want to say but choose to keep inside. Books allow us to see people in all of their full, vulnerable humanness. And, when it’s time to say goodbye to the strangers we now know as well as we know ourselves, a sort of mourning begins to take place. It can be tough to leave the worlds we spend so much time in; fiction and all.

 

However, thanks to social media, the goodbye doesn’t have to be complete; now you can scroll through the photos of your favorite book worlds to your heart’s content! 

 

Check out these fifteen Instagram accounts dedicated to your favorite books and authors!

 

1. A Little Life @alittlelifebook

 

 

#bookfacefriday by @dyahayuni #alittlelifebook

A post shared by A Little Life: A Novel (@alittlelifebook) on

 

 

2. Pride & Prejudice @pandp2005

 

 

 

3. Harry Potter @thepottercollector

 

 

 

4. Stephen King @jobis89

 

 

I have an important task for you all……. please help me choose my next audiobook! ? . The 12 books pictured are the 12 possible contenders! They’re books I read back near the beginning of my King journey, and are the ones that I feel open to revisiting right now (in that my memory is patchy ?) . So if you want, pick TWO books from those pictured and I’ll do a quick tally tomorrow before I embark on my run. I’ll be able to download and start listening to the most popular choice right away ?? . Choose wisely, Constant Readers. And God have mercy on the evil people who choose The Stand… 47 hours long!!! ? . . . . . . . . #stephenking #audiobook #audible #bookcollage #bookcover #hardback #firstedition #readersareleaders #bibliophile #bookstagram #reading #igreads #bookworm #booknerd #booklover #booklove #lovebooks #bookish #bookaddict #read #fiction

A post shared by Johann ? Stephen King Nerd ? (@jobis89) on

 

 

5. Sylvia Plath @sylviaplathpoetry

 

 

(cr. @her_love_for_words ♡)

A post shared by Sylvia Plath (@sylviaplathpoetry) on

 

 

6. Agatha Christie @officialagathachristie

 

 

 

7. Paulo Coelho @paulocoelhoquote

 

 

 

8. Virginia Woolf @virginiawoolfblog

 

 

Virginia Woolf sitting on a beach in Greece in 1932. #virginiawoolf

A post shared by Virginia Woolf Blog (@virginiawoolfblog) on

 

 

9. Jane Austen @janeofausten

 

 

 

10. Edgar Allan Poe @edgar.allan.poe

 

 

Q: Why did Poe write such dark stories? • A: Poe wrote for magazines which demanded stories that would appeal to a mass audience, so he gave them what they wanted. In fact, he only wrote about fifteen horror stories out of a total of seventy tales. Poe actually produced far more comedies than terror tales. He also wrote science fiction, mysteries, adventure stories, scientific essays, and a book about seashells. Today’s readers tend to prefer his horror stories, but in Poe’s time, his audience liked the mysteries better. He last book of short stories, Tales of Edgar A. Poe (1845), only contained one horror story among a collection of mysteries and science fiction. Although he suffered bouts of depression after his wife’s death, Poe wasn’t a terribly morbid or melancholy person. • Mary Bronson, who, as a young girl, visited Poe with her father, later recalled, “We saw Mr. Poe walking in his yard, and most agreeably was I surprised to see a very handsome and elegant appearing gentleman, who welcomed us with a quiet, cordial, and graceful politeness that ill accorded with my imaginary sombre poet. I dare say I looked the surprise I felt, for I saw an amused look on his face as I raised my eyes a second time…” (LeDuc, Mary Elizabeth Bronson, “Recollections of Edgar A. Poe,” Home Journal, whole no. 754, July 21, 1860, p. 3) • #EdgarAllanPoe Photo by: @rebecca_ellix

A post shared by Edgar Allan Poe (@edgar.allan.poe) on

 

 

11. The Brontë Sisters @bronteforever

 

 

The Great American Read on PBS has started and they are featuring 100 of the most beloved books, and choosing one final winner. Please vote for the top one! Please go to @greatamericanreadpbs and click on the link in their bio to vote for either Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights. I’m so glad both Bronte sisters were featured on this list of world renown novels. __________________________________________ #bronte #brontes #thebrontes #brontesisters #bronteforever #emilybronte #charlottebronte #annebronte #bookaddicts #epicreads #janeeyre #mustread #bookworm #booknerd #books #booklover #bookstagram #bookish #literature #instabook #igread #wutheringheights #victorian #classicnovels #brontësisters #greatreadpbs #readinggoals #votejaneeyre

A post shared by ??The Bronte Sisters ? (@bronteforever) on

 

 

12. Charles Dickens @dickensmuseum

 

 

 

13. Alice in Wonderland @alice_in_wonderland_books

 

 

 

14. Haruki Murakami @harukimurakamiquotes

 

 

 

15. Infinite Jest @drawinginfinitejest

 

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Twitter